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Is Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) An All or None Deal?. Dr. Russ Johnson, Jonah President, Improvement Quest, Inc. Loveland, CO 80538 970-581-0075 Improvementquest@aol.com. What is a project?. A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service (PMI-BOK 1996)

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is critical chain project management ccpm an all or none deal
Is Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM)An All or None Deal?

Dr. Russ Johnson, Jonah

President, Improvement Quest, Inc.

Loveland, CO 80538

970-581-0075

Improvementquest@aol.com

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

what is a project
What is a project?
  • A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service(PMI-BOK 1996)
  • Consists of three major efforts:
    • Planning
    • Execution
    • Management

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide3

What is project management?

  • The application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations.

(PMI -BOK, 1996)

    • A balancing act between the three project commitments
      • Scope
      • Time
      • Budget
    • Common elements
      • A scheduling mechanism (software and rules)
      • Existing management paradigms
      • Human behavior

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

project characteristics
Project characteristics

All projects have many things in common:

  • They involve high uncertainty.
  • They involve three different and perceptually opposing commitments: Due date, budget, and content
  • They require different levels of a variety of expertise and resources at different times and for different amounts of time
  • They are impacted by variability within and between events

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

establishing some current reality
Establishing some current reality
  • Do we go back to resources and pressure them to reduce their time and/or cost estimates?
  • Do we hold resources to the scheduled start and finish dates for activities?
  • Do we sometimes miss entire activities or at least dependencies in the planning stages of the project?
  • Do our projects quickly evolve to having multiple critical paths?
  • Do our projects seem to always be behind?

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide6

Are these are fairly typical?

  • Existing project work is not complete before new projects require a shifting in priorities.
  • The organization is too slow responding to important opportunities.
  • Management feels constant pressure to increaseresources to handle peak project loads.
  • Promised lead times are longer than desired.
  • There are difficulties completing projects on time.
  • There is too much rework activity.
slide7

Are these are fairly typical?

  • There are difficulties completing projects within budget.
  • Project scope/content is too often compromised to meet dates and/or budget.
  • Some projects are abandoned or completed without the organization gaining the promised benefit.
  • Project Managers and resource managers have frequent conflicts about priorities and resource commitments.
  • Problems in one part of a project cascade into other parts of the project and/or into other projects.
slide8
If …
  • Our reputation is important to us, and
  • Our past experience has been a mixed bag that has often left our customers less than elated with our performance and shaken their confidence in us, and
  • We need to be able to communicate status to a variety of people and be able to quickly and accurately predict the impact of change and resource availability and assignment issues, and
  • Conditions and expectations today are fundamentally different than they were when the current formal project management approach was developed,
    • Resources are scarce and heavily shared
    • We are moving from competitive bid to design-build and negotiated contracts
    • It is becoming more and more critical that we collaborate rather than combat

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide9
Then…
  • Do we need to approach project management differently in terms of a formal planning, execution and monitoring/reporting process?
  • Is there an alternative to the primary formal project management style or methodology we use today?
  • If so, do we have the knowledge and experience we would need relative to these alternatives to be able to determine which one would be best for our needs and situation?

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

a formal project management tool should
A formal project management tool should

Help us with:

  • Planning the project
  • Executing the plan
  • Managing the process

Set us up for success in both the current projects and future projects

Facilitate collaborative efforts and picking the best partners

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

even more fundamentally the system we put in place should
Even more fundamentally, the system we put in place should
  • Improve flow (order to cash in hand cycle time) as the primary objective
  • Be translatable into practical mechanisms that guides the operation when not to produce
  • Enable the need to abolish local efficiencies
  • Include a focusing process to balance flow

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

two basic approaches
Two basic approaches
  • Traditional – two names same basic concepts
    • PERT (Program Evaluation & Review Technique)
    • CPM (Critical Path Method)
  • Contemporary
    • Critical Chain

Lets examine the traditional

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

traditional
Traditional
  • PERT/CPM
    • Developed in parallel in the 1950’s
    • Needed a way to organize highly complex project (Polaris Missile)
    • Money and resources were not a problem
    • Many modifications over the years to try to accommodate the fact that money and resources are now a big issue
    • Constantly increasing sophistication of software and hardware has perpetuated the idea that problems with the process can be solved if we can just get enough data and process it fast enough
    • Tremendous inertia (50 years of common practice) and investment causes considerable resistance to different approaches

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide14

Typical Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)

Spring home repair

Paint Inside

Replace Roof

Landscape Yard

Move Furniture

Cover Floors

Mask Windows

Paint

Remove Dead Tree

Plant Shrubs

Install Sprinkler System

Select Paint

Mix Paint

Apply Paint

Activity to schedule

Summary activity

slide15

How a project looks graphically

Network (PERT View)

Bar Chart (Gantt View)

What do all of these things represent?

slide16

Traditional (PERT/CPM)

  • Mechanisms for building the schedule
    • Assumption of infinite resource availability before identifying the Critical Path

Initial Critical Path equals longest

sequence of task and path dependencies

exclusive of resource dependencies

  • Projected Lead Time
slide17

Traditional (PERT/CPM)

  • Resolving contentions (the real CP)
    • Assumption of infinite resource availability before identifying the critical path
    • Resolving resource contentions from start of project to completion giving priority to Critical Path tasks
  • Increase in Projected Lead Time
  • with resource contentions resolved
  • Projected Lead Time
slide18

10

10

10

10

10

Assumptions that variation in task times follow a normal distribution

10%

Total series variation = square root of thesum of the variances squared

20%

20%

20%

20%

20%

+/-5

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

50

Reality: the potential impact of bad things is much greater than the potential impact of good

7 10 13 25

10% 50% 90% 90%

slide19

10

10

10

10

10

10%

20%

20%

20%

20%

20%

+/-5

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

50

10

10

10

10

10

What happens in each situation if a task is finished late? or early ?

slide20

?

?

?

?

?

Assumptions that variations of actual task times will cancel each other out

10%

20%

20%

20%

20%

20%

-2/+?

-2/+?

-2/+?

-2/+?

-2/+?

-5/+?

50

10

10

10

10

10

?

52

Late

10

10

12

10

10

Early/late

48

10

6

10

12

10

52

No report

10

10

10

12

6

slide21

10

Assumptions that variations of actual task times will cancel each other out

Total path/integration variation = Probability of event 1 * Probability of event 2 * Probability of event 3 *Probability of event 4

10

Probability of orange integration task starting on time if all four feeding task time estimates are 90% is 66%(.9*.9*.9*.9)

10

10

10

slide22

No consistent method for determining when tasks with float should start

  • Do we start these * tasks as soon as possible (ASAP), as late as possible (ALAP), or somewhere in between?

*

*

*

*

*

Float

  • Critical Path
slide23

No mechanism for decoupling the overall project from individual task and path variations

Today with schedule updated for future

traditional pert cpm
Traditional (PERT/CPM)
  • Managing the schedule
    • Panic sets in with the first late task
    • Focus switches from the global perspective of the original project goals to a more local perspective of task completion
    • At the task level, the focus switches from content, dependencies, and durations to start and end dates
    • We hold resources to the original schedule dates in place of the necessary conditions that define what is needed to start a task and the deliverables that define when a task is finished

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide25

Traditional Project control

No reliable mechanisms to determine when a project is in trouble or to determine which activities can afford to wait awhile - No Visibility of the Impact of Decisions or Variability!

Importance is placed on achieving task or milestone conformance to scheduled start and completion dates rather than deliverables in an effort to insure or improve project on time performance.

When faced with conflicting task priorities and no clear way to determine how much safety remains in each task, resources and Resource Managers multi-task to try to minimize the harm to either task.

how does this fit with our fundamental needs of the system
How does this fit with our fundamental needs of the system?
  • Improve flow (order to cash in hand cycle time) as the primary objective
  • Be translatable into practical mechanisms that guide the operation when not to produce
  • Enable the need to abolish local efficiencies
  • Include a focusing process to balance flow

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

contemporary
Contemporary
  • Critical Chain
    • Developed in the early 1990’s
    • Utilized the Thought Process tools of the Theory of Constraints to analyze the situation and test the solution
    • Started from scratch taking into account current realities of limited resources, money and time.
    • Focused not only on the mechanical/software aspects of organizing the project but also looked heavily at the psychological and human behavioral issues of projects
      • This includes the negative behaviors of years of experience and;
      • The desired behaviors
    • Used aspects of traditional approaches where applicable

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

toc s view of project management
TOC’s View of Project Management
  • Improving flow:
    • Minimize bad multi-tasking both within and between projects
    • Multi-project environment – Freeze about 25% of the projects to switch focus to finishing work rather than starting
    • Individual projects
      • Plan project from a necessity point of view – starting with desired outcome and working to beginning (Handoff)
      • Separate safety from task time to get an aggressive but possible time to create a sense of urgency

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

toc s view of project management1
TOC’s View of Project Management
  • When not to work:
    • Aggregate ½ of the freed safety to create buffers
    • Buffers correctly set tasks to the as late as possible position while still protecting the project due date form 95% of the uncertainty
    • Relative status of buffers tells which task a resource should work on when there is more than one open task for that resource – this minimizes bad multi-tasking
    • Full Kit concept delays start of task until all necessary inputs are available to minimize ineffective workarounds

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

toc s view of project management2
TOC’s View of Project Management
  • Abolish local efficiencies :
    • Focus is on completing work as fast and accurately as possible and getting it handed off
    • What constitutes “done” is clearly defined so that tasks can’t be drawn out to fill available time (Parkinson’s law and 3 minute egg rule)
    • The only dates that are important are necessary milestones and the project completion promise – focus is on content not dates
    • Review progress by asking how long to finish not what percent is complete

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

toc s view of project management3
TOC’s View of Project Management
  • Focusing process to balance flow
    • Buffer Management:
      • Buffer status (Green, Yellow, Red) directs management as to when, and how, to react to individual disruptions to flow
      • Causes for delays that result in buffer consumption are recorded and analyzed to target common offender disruptions to flow. (Pareto) This can be process/activity focused and/or resource focused
    • Lean, Six-Sigma and other process improvement tools are utilized to systematically and continuously improve flow

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide32
The assumption that the earlier we start a project/task, the earlier it will be finished

How we estimate durations

bad multi-tasking

Missing tasks and/or dependencies in the planning stage

Flow killers

slide33
Tactic – Freeze 25% of open projects

Multi-project fast lane

Level of Management involvement

Rate of completion

Safe Zone

X

Number of open projects or tasks

slide34
Productive work time

Nonproductive time

Safety (insurance against uncertainty)

What is estimated task time really composed of?

slide35

10

10

10

10

10

?

?

?

?

?

10%

20%

20%

20%

20%

20%

+/-5

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

+/-2

50

As risk or non-validaccountability

increases so will safety

Duration 7 10 13 45

Probability 10% 50% 90% 90%

?

the sixes game
The Sixes Game

You work in my organization

You are rewarded according to your performance versus a standard

The standard is the maximum number of rolls it should take to get a 6

Your performance is based on your roll of the dice

You will be measured on the number of rolls it actually takes you to get a 6

how we waste safety
How we waste safety

Parkinson’s law - Work expands to fill the time available (poor definition of DONE)

Three minute egg rule - There is an implication of poor quality if done too soon as well as changed expectations regarding future estimates

Student syndrome – Argue for extension of time estimate for all kinds of reasons then, Why do today what you can put off to tomorrow

Multi-tasking - Increases lead time for any individual activity as there is unplanned time spent starting and stopping

slide38

Understanding the problem further

Task completion times

The time to complete each task consists of:

• the time to perform the task,

• the time to set up to work on the task (finding everything and remembering where you left off)

again and again.

• the time to shut down or set down time.

• the time the task had to wait for the resource while

the resource worked on other tasks.

slide39

Multi-tasking

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

How work was planned

C

How work was performed

Actual resource time

the multi tasking game
The multi-tasking Game

Our job is to complete three tasks:

  • Write a column of numbers from 1-26
  • Write the letters of the alphabet from A to Z
  • Draw a repeating sequence of Square, circle, triangle until you have 26 objects
  • You must alternate columns as you complete your task (number, letter, shape)

We will time to see how long it takes

slide41

Is the buffer time already in the estimate?

Have we validated that uncertainty exists and that we need to protect ourselves from it?

Have we discovered that everyone protects themselves by adding significant amounts of safety time?

Is it true that the more project experience the more safety included?

Who has control of the safety? Who should?

Have we discovered that a significant amount of the safety that is built in to the tasks is, in the end, wasted?

separating the work from the safety
Separating the work from the safety

Traditional – Distributed safety time remains within the tasks and in the control of each resource. Everyone must protect themselves as we know Murphy will strike we just don’t know when and where.

Critical Chain - Aggregated safety time is gathered and placed strategically in the control of the project manager but available to the resources when needed. We still don’t know when and where Murphy will strike but we control the insurance.

50 % for work

25% freed

25% for insurance/buffer

Buffer

Freed safety

negotiations
Traditional

Give plans and specs and ask for a price and duration

Try to get their numbers to match your needs after the fact

Each variable is now played against the otherLower cost=longer timeLess time=reduced scope

The resource is in control of the negotiations

TOC – Critical Chain

Confirm capability to perform scope and deliverables

Determine prerequisites

Get estimate of duration and first availability(90% skewed time likely)

Split time 50:50

Check fit to schedule

Ask for cost reminding that others are bidding under same circumstances

Negotiations
critical chain task definition and building of the project network
Critical Chain Task Definition and Building of the Project Network

Task Definition and Building of the Project Network (begin with the end in mind)

  • Clear identification of deliverables needed to accomplish project goals stated in terms of expected outcomes for, or impacts to, the organization
  • Clear identification of expectations of project plan and management is included in the project goals definition
  • The tasks are defined from the end (future) of the project to the beginning (current time)
  • Task definition is complete when all starting tasks have either already begun or their required inputs are already available

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide45

Defining tasks and relationships simultaneously

Task thataccomplishesthe need or overcomesthe obstacle

Need orobstacle

Clearly statedobjectives of theproject and theproject plan

Need orobstacle

Tasks are defined by starting with the project goal(s) and then working earlier in time until currently occurring activities are reached by asking: In order to… I must immediately have completed

Need orobstacle

When branches occur, one branch is completed before starting another

slide46

Determining the who, what, and how long

?

Tasks definition is complete when the starting tasks are either already in process or all inputs needed to begin them are available.

The resources needed to perform the tasks can now be brought in to help verify that no tasks or needed inputs or requirements have been missed. This includes adding detail where what is needed is uncertain (outsourced activity).

Once the work is defined, the times to complete the work can be determined.

slide47

Converting to the Gantt view

  • There is no need to convert WBS scheduled activities to PERT view (precedence diagram) to determine task dependencies (task to task and paths/integrations) as this was done simultaneously with task identification
    • This information does still need to be entered into our scheduling software
  • The network view must still be converted to the Gantt view to determine time relationships to allow us to identify the Critical Chain and immunize the schedule from variability
    • The software does this for us

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide48

How a project looks graphically

Network View

?

Bar Chart (Gantt View)

The need and obstacle elements of the network view disappear in the Bar Chart (Gantt View) as they do not contain elements of work or time

mechanisms for immunizing the schedule
Mechanisms for immunizing the schedule
  • TOC - Critical Chain
    • Task, path, and resource dependencies are all considered prior to identifying the “Critical Chain”
    • Resource contentions are resolved from project completion toward start
    • Strategically sized and placed buffers allow decoupling of the overall project from individual task and path variations
      • Buffer = 1/3 of total path time (task + Buffer)

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide50

Identifying the Critical Chain

Move all tasks to as late as possible and all dependencies are taken into account (task, path and resource)

slide51

Identifying the Critical Chain

Begin resolving resource contentions by moving competing task to earlier time

slide52

Identifying the Critical Chain

Continue resolving resource contentions from the end of the project to the beginning.

(CC)

The Critical Chain (CC)is the longest path of continuous dependent events including resource, task and path dependencies.

slide53

Immunizing the project from variation along the Critical Chain:

Sizing and placing the project completion buffer (PCB)

(CC)

PCB

The project completion buffer (PCB) acts as a variation absorber and is equal to 50% of the total task time along the Critical Chain making it 1/3 of the total project lead time.

slide54

Immunizing the Critical Chain:

Sizing and placing the feeding buffers (FB)

***

**

PCB

(CC)

**

***

Identify locations where activities feed into (integrate with) the Critical Chain.

The feeding may be due to task dependencies*, path dependencies** or resource dependencies ***

slide55

Immunizing the Critical Chain:

Sizing and placing the feeding buffers (FB)

FB

*

*

FB

PCB

(CC)

FB

FB

*

*

The feeding buffers* (FB) act as variation isolators between non Critical Chain activities and the Critical Chain.

They are also equal to 50% of the total task time along the chain of tasks they are isolating.

This may result in gaps in the Critical Chain and/or the need to start a non-Critical Chain activity before the Critical Chain.

slide56

Project lead time

FB

FB

PCB

(CC)

FB

FB

This Feeding Buffer creates a new resource conflict but it is not resolved as all times are estimates so there may or may not be a conflict during actual execution and if so the buffer will address it

The actual project start or end date is relative to time needs of the project: Drop Dead or Open Ended

slide57

When not to produce

The feeding buffers tell us the right time (not too early or late) to start non-critical tasks

Project lead time

FB

FB

PCB

(CC)

FB

FB

slide58

Critical Chain

FB

FB

PCB

(CC)

FB

FB

20%-25% time advantage

Promised project lead time

PERT/CPM

slide59

FB

PCB

FB

What about a multiple project environment?

Using a drum, key resource, to stagger projects

The start of the next project would be based on the placement of the last drum task in the current schedule and the first drum task in the next project with a buffer between the last and first respectively

slide60

FB

PCB

FB

FB

PCB

FB

If the red resource is the drum

Project One

DB

Project Two

DB

managing the schedule
Managing the schedule
  • TOC - Critical Chain - Buffer Management
      • Focus remains on the global perspective of the original project goals
      • Progress is reported based on buffer status and estimated time for remaining tasks
      • At the task level, the focus is on getting the job done as soon as possible while maintaining original content
      • The buffers allow time to plan and react appropriately to variation in the schedule

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

slide62

Buffers are used to provide focus and early warning to protect the critical chain and due date

WATCH

OK

Zone 3

ACT

Zone 1

& PLAN

Zone 2

BUFFER

MANAGEMENT

Remaining

Project Buffer:

100% 67%

67% 33%

33% 0%

slide63

Project Control - Buffer Management

The mechanism for gathering data provides us a glimpse into the future - so we can take action before we are in trouble while also allowing us time to not be pressured to act when actions are not necessary.

The organization gathers the information for the status of the buffers in the following way:

Each resource that is working on the project gives a “daily” status of the time they estimate they still need to work until the task is complete. That information is used to calculate whether any buffer time would be gained or lost if these time estimates proved true.

This “daily” interaction is key to reinforce new behaviors and to provide opportunities to mentor resources.

slide64

Project Control - Buffer Management

Project Buffer Status

DayTaskTo GoBuffer

1 217 10 90

35 168 5 69

51 143 8 55

59 143 11 44

85 122 15 51

101 122 20 30

111 32 4 69

slide65

CCPM Project Control:When and where to work and when and where to intervene

Do we have a way to determine how much safety is left

if there is a conflict for the resources?

Yes - The Project Buffers!

We apply Buffer Management via comparing buffer statusas our control mechanism.

slide66

Who gets the scarce resource?

Buffer status report

OK

WATCH & PLAN

ACT

*Project A PCB Status

Project A FB1 Status

** Project A FB2 Status

* Project A FB3 Status

Project B PCB Status

Project B FB1 Status

** Project B FB2 Status

Project B FB3 Status

Tasks competing for same resource * **

process of ongoing improvement poogi evaluating resources
Process of Ongoing Improvement (POOGI) Evaluating Resources
  • Buffer impact (should track +, -, and average)
    • Number of charged or credited times they impact the buffer
    • Charged duration of the impacts

(Should be viewed from both absolute and relative perspectives)

  • Causes for charged impacts
    • Same problem over and over
    • Different issues from time to time
      • Poor at identifying potential problems
      • Constantly understaffing project
      • High levels of rework
  • Ability to consistently reduce the cost and time to do similar work from project to project

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

how does this fit with our fundamental needs of the system1
How does this fit with our fundamental needs of the system?
  • Improve flow (order to cash in hand cycle time) as the primary objective
  • Be translatable into practical mechanisms that guide the operation when not to produce
  • Enable the need to abolish local efficiencies
  • Include a focusing process to balance flow

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

buffer management

Buffer Management

Here is a project that has a Critical Chain of 85 days, a Project Buffer of 43 days and a total lead time of 128 days.

buffer management1

Buffer Management

The first task completes 5 days early, but the second task takes 25 days to complete. Buffer Management shows the Project Buffer to be in Zone 3. Net schedule variance +10 days. What action should the Project Manager take?

Planned -> actual

buffer management2

Buffer Management

After 20 days of work, the resource assigned to the third task is projecting completion in 20 days. Buffer Management shows the Project Buffer to be in Zone 2. What action should the Project Manager take?

Planned -> actual

buffer management3

Buffer Management

After 30 days of work, the resource assigned to the third task is still projecting completion in 20 days. Buffer Management shows the Project Buffer to be in Zone 1. What action should the Project Manager take?

Planned -> actual

buffer management4

Buffer Management

Here is a project has a Critical Chain of 85 days, a Project Buffer of 43 days and a total lead time of 128 days.

buffer management5

Buffer Management

The first task completes 5 days early, but the second task takes 25 days to complete. Buffer Management shows the Project Buffer to be in Zone 3. The first task of the feeding path is accomplished in the duration time. What action should the Project Manager take?

Planned -> actual

buffer management6

Buffer Management

After 20 days of work, the resource assigned to the third task is projecting completion in 20 days. Buffer Management shows the Project Buffer to be in Zone 2. The second task of the feeding buffer is projecting completion in another 10 days. What action should the Project Manager take?

buffer management7

Buffer Management

After 30 days of work, the resource assigned to the third task is still projecting completion in 20 days. Buffer Management shows the Project Buffer to be in Zone 1. What action should the Project Manager take?

organizational cultural changes
Organizational Cultural Changes
  • Resulting Effects
    • Surges or peak demands on resources are minimized or non existent
    • Natural human behaviors are used to create an environment of continuous improvement
    • Projects are consistently delivered on or before committed dates, often under budget, and with all original scope objectives in place
    • More projects can be accomplished within the same time and with the same resources

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

key tactics of ccpm that could be used without full implementation
Key tactics of CCPM that could be used without full implementation
  • Necessity approach to Network building
  • Negotiation process
  • Critical Chain/path identification from end to beginning
  • Tracking progress by asking how long to finish
  • Minimize multi-tasking – can make a conscious effort but will not have buffers to direct and enforce
  • Modification of buffer based priority – Each activity you make a commitment to has a due date. The time between making the commitment and the due dale = 100%. You can work whatever task has used the highest % of its assigned buffer

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

ccpm as a growth strategy
CCPM as a growth strategy
  • Critical Chain offers a new and refreshing approach and solution for the undesirable effects project managers and organizations can no longer afford to suffer from
  • Critical Chain is a complete solution that deals with both the algorithms of scheduling and the impacts of, and on, human behavior
  • It is a solution that identifies the correct data processing needed to support schedule creation and management

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO

conclusions
Conclusions
  • Critical Chain offers a new and refreshing approach and solution for the undesirable effects project managers and organizations can no longer afford to suffer from
  • Critical Chain is a complete solution that deals with both the algorithms of scheduling and the impacts of, and on, human behavior
  • It is a solution that identifies the correct data processing needed to support schedule creation and management

Dr. Russ Johnson, President Improvement Quest, Inc Loveland, CO