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Kids Eat Right Ensuring Quality Nutrition
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  1. Kids Eat RightEnsuring Quality Nutrition

  2. Childhood Obesity Prevention is a Top Priority • Nearly 10 years since Surgeon General report and childhood obesity rates still at epidemic proportions • There is a new level of urgency to end the childhood obesity epidemic and more people are getting involved than ever before • The importance of the issue is highlighted by the First Lady’s Let’s Move Campaign

  3. Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies • Many of the childhood obesity prevention strategies have focused on restricting fat, sugar, sweetened beverages, and “junk food” • Strategies have NOT addressed the total nutrient needs of children resulting in chronic low intake of nutrient rich foods • Consequently, many American children are simultaneously over-fed AND under-nourished

  4. Poor Nutrition Results In • Visible problem of overweight and obesity • Over 30% of kids 2-19 are overweight or obese • 16.9% obese • 14.8% overweight • Invisible problems of undernourished and hunger • Over 22% of children live in homes with insufficient food

  5. The majority of children and adolescents have inadequate consumption of nutrients, especially vitamins A, C, D, and E, and phosphorus and magnesium • These are critical for normal growth and development, learning and cognition Undernourished

  6. Undernourished • 40% of the calories consumed by US youth have no nutritive value other than calories, regardless of whether these children are normal weight or overweight. • These food choices are displacing higher-nutrient foods • Childhood obesity and under-nourishment are BOTH consequences of what children are NOT eating

  7. Undernourishment and Learning • Poor nutrition and hunger interferes with cognitive function and is associated with lower achievement • Even well nourished students who skip breakfast have difficulty concentrating and scoring well on tests

  8. The Family Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey In 2010, the ADA Foundation fielded the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey to gain a better understanding of children’s attitudes and behaviors that influence nutrient consumption and healthy weights

  9. Survey Methodology • Follow-up to a similar 2003 survey • Knowledge Networks fielded survey in Feb 2010 with pairs of children and parents randomly selected from nationally representative panel. • Parents with children aged 8 to 17 comprise the three samples: • 754 pairs of children and parents that are representative of the US population • 209 African American • 230 Hispanic

  10. Survey Objectives • 2003 and 2010 data assessed for: • Changes in parent’s awareness of children’s attitudes and behaviors (child-parent dyads) • Changes in children’s attitudes and behaviors • 2010 data assessed for: • Child-parent dyad correlation by race • Children’s attitudes and behaviors by race, gender, household income, and school grades

  11. From 2003 to 2010: Children and Parents Make Progress

  12. Areas of Improvement • Increase in alignment of answers of children and parents, indicating more awareness of parents when it comes to their children’s attitudes, behaviors, and choices when it comes to food and activity. • Decrease in children’s purchases from vending machines or snack bars, fast food restaurants, and convenience stores. • More families eating meals together and participating in physical activity together. More children eating regularly scheduled dinners.

  13. Barriers: When, Where and Why Children Eat

  14. When Kids Eat How often over the past week did you eat “all” or “most” of the time? *Statistically significant differences by race, p<0.05; **Statistically significant differences by race, p<0.001; Parent-child dyad correlation is statistically significant, p<0.05

  15. When Kids Do Not Eat Children do not eat breakfast and dinner all the time • 42% white, 59% African American, and 42% Hispanic children do NOT eat breakfast all the time • 67% of whites from low income (< $24,999) homes and African Americans from medium income ($25,000-74,999) homes do NOT eat breakfast all the time • 22% white, 34% African American, and 38% Hispanic children do NOT eat dinner all the time • 46% of Hispanics and 41% of African Americans from medium income ($25,000-74,999) homes do NOT eat dinner all the time

  16. Where Kids Eat • 56% white, 75% African American, and 65% of Hispanic children eat school lunch on most days* • Many children do not eat school lunch because they dislike what is offered or how it tastes (white 49.7%, African American 63.2%, Hispanic 59.3%) *Statistically significant differences by race, p<0.001,

  17. Where Kids Eat If children did not eat a school lunch, they were asked if they eat from... *Statistically significant differences by race, p<0.001

  18. Children and Parents Are Ready for Change

  19. Number of Days Getting 60 Minutes Physical Activity in the Past Week Parent-child dyad correlation is statistically significant, p<0.05

  20. Interest in Being Physically Active It would help me be more active if…. *Statistically significant differences by race, p<0.001, Parent-child dyad correlation statistically significant, p<0.05

  21. Interest in Being Physically Active It would help me be more active if…. *Statistically significant differences by race, p<0.05, **Statistically significant differences by race, p<0.001 Parent-child dyad correlation is statistically significant, p<0.05

  22. Interest in Eating Healthier It would help me eat healthier if…. * Differences are statistically significant p<0.05; ** Differences are statistically significant p<0.001; Parent-child dyad correlation is statistically significant, p<0.05

  23. Interest in Eating Healthier It would help me eat healthier if…. * Statistically significant differences, p<0.05; **Statistically significant differences p<0.001; Parent-child dyad correlation is statistically significant, p<0.05

  24. How Often Kids and Parents Do These Activities Together 3+ Days a Week *Statistically significant differences, p<0.05, Parent-child dyad correlation is statistically significant, p<0.05

  25. Role Models If you had to name one person who you admire, who would that be?

  26. Summary • There are still significant barriers to adequate nutrient consumption including lack of nutrition knowledge, skipping meals, and eating for reasons other than hunger • Children want to eat healthier and be more physically active and see their parents as their #1 role model • Schools and families provide a great opportunity to support a quality nutrition approach

  27. Kids Eat Right • Launched in November 2010 by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) and the American Dietetic Association Foundation (ADAF) • Purpose: to re-frame the childhood obesity prevention dialogue to include quality nutrition

  28. Kids Eat Right Goals • Childhood obesity prevention efforts comprehensively address the nutrient needs of all youth increasing attention towards the foods kids need to eat more often. • ADA members take actions supporting the White House Task Force for childhood obesity prevention to improve nutrition and physical activity in communities, schools and with families. • RDs are sought to provide evidence-based nutrition guidance supporting healthy weight and quality nutrition.

  29. Kids Eat Right • ADA is mobilizing its 71,000 members participate in activities to support a quality nutrition approach: • Using Fuel Up to Play 60 to help schools make changes with students • Leading parent workshops • Joining community coalitions and providing nutrition expertise to childhood obesity prevention efforts • Meeting with school leaders to discuss the importance of quality school meals and the link between nutrition and learning

  30. Kids Eat Right • When addressing childhood obesity, it is critical to include a quality nutrition approach to ensure we are not unintentionally harming our children • Registered Dietitians have the education, training, and expertise to ensure children’s diets have all the necessary nutrients for proper growth and development • As part of the Kids Eat Right initiative, Registered Dietitians across the country are volunteering their time and expertise to help communities, schools, and families address quality nutrition • To learn more about Kids Eat Right, visit www.kidseatright.org