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Emerging results from the AEDI: implications for Australia's children. Associate Professor Sharon Goldfeld Paediatrician and Research Fellow Centre for Community Child Health, Royal Children's Hospital Murdoch Childrens Research Institute sharon.goldfeld@rch.org.au.

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emerging results from the aedi implications for australia s children

Emerging results from the AEDI: implications for Australia's children

Associate Professor Sharon Goldfeld

Paediatrician and Research Fellow

Centre for Community Child Health, Royal Children's Hospital

Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

sharon.goldfeld@rch.org.au

slide2

“A society that is good to children is one with the smallest possible inequalities for children, with the vast majority of them having the same opportunities from birth for health, education, inclusion and participation.”

(Stanley, Richardson & Prior, 2005)

overview
Overview
  • Why early childhood matters
  • Why literacy matters
  • Why data matter
  • Health and developmental inequalities in Australia: the results of the AEDI
  • Community as a potential platform for change
building strong foundations
Building strong foundations

Getting the foundations right is important – healthy brain development is a prerequisite for future health and wellbeing.

developmental health opportunity
Developmental health opportunity

Ideal child-development trajectory

Opportunity

Current practice

At-risk child-development trajectorywithout intervention

Age

return on investment in the early years
Return on investment in the early years

Reference: Cunha et. al., 2006.

impact of adversity early in life
Impact of adversity early in life

Hackman D, Farah M, Meaney M. Socio economic status and the brain: mechanistic insights from human and animal research. Neuroscience. Vol11 2010; 651-659

targeting low ses students v targeting low performing students source masters 2009 using pisa data
Targeting low-ses students v. targeting low performing students Source: Masters (2009) using PISA data
slide27

Creating sustainable policy:

Recognition of the problem

Identification of the solution through policy

Evidence based policy

Data

Children on the

policy agenda

Political imperative

Kingdon J. Agendas, Alternatives and Public Policies. 2nd ed. New York: Harper Collins College Publishers, 1995

slide31

The AEDI is a relative population measure of how young children are developing in different Australian communities.

the aedi looks at how groups of children are developing
The AEDI looks at how groups of children are developing

and reports back on how groups of children are developing.

It gathers information

on each child…

what is the aim of the aedi
What is the aim of the AEDI?

To measure the health and development of populations of young children to assist communities and governments to plan and assess the effectiveness of their efforts in supporting young children and their families.

national implementation
National implementation:
  • National data collection from 1 May to 31 July 2009
  • Data collected by teachers through a secure web based data entry system
  • Schools provided with funding of 1 hour for teacher training and 30 minutes per completed checklist
  • Data analysed and reported based on where children live
  • AEDI were re-run in small communities in 2010.
slide35

2009 snapshot of Australia’s children:

Northern Territory: 3,255

Queensland: 55,449

WA: 27,579

NSW: 87,168

SA: 16,208

ACT: 4,432

Victoria: 61,196

Tasmania: 5,916

Total = 261,203 children (97.5% of estimated population)

national numbers
National Numbers

Data collected on 261, 203 children (97.5%).

15,528 teachers from 7,423 schools (95.6% of all schools) participated.

Teacher feedback (86.4% of all teachers, n=13,815):

90.1% found AEDI easy to complete

63.9% thought AEDI will be beneficial to their work

74.8% felt the AEDI will assist their community to better understand the health and development of children in their area

key findings
Key Findings

Percentage of children developmentally vulnerable (DV) across Australia by jurisdiction

australian indigenous children and seifa percentage developmental vulnerability
Australian Indigenous children and SEIFA: Percentage developmental vulnerability

Green = Vulnerable on one or more domains

Yellow = No vulnerability

slide42

Australian Indigenous children and SEIFA: Number developmentally vulnerable

Green = Vulnerable on one or more domains

Yellow = No vulnerability