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Sycophant By: Faith Harp. Adjective Pronounced [ sik- uh- f uh nt] Definition: “A servile, self-seeking flatterer.” -Servile- meanly submissive “When her career was riding high, the self-deluded actress often mistook sycophants for true friends.”

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sycophant by faith harp
SycophantBy: Faith Harp
  • Adjective
  • Pronounced [sik-uh-fuhnt]
  • Definition: “A servile, self-seeking flatterer.”

-Servile- meanly submissive

  • “When her career was riding high, the self-deluded actress often mistook sycophants for true friends.”
  • Synonyms: Suck-up, brownnoser, follower
  • Source: www.merriam-webster.com
malice
Malice
  • –noun 1. desire to inflict injury, harm, or suffering on another, either because of a hostile impulse or out of deep-seated meanness: the malice and spite of a lifelong enemy.
  • 2. Law . evil intent on the part of a person who commits a wrongful act injurious to others.
  • O.K. , so we don't always see eye to eye but there's never been any real malice in our dealings before.
  • Dakota Vinson
  • Dictionary.com
  • Google
adjective

Irascible

Justin Crenshaw

Pronunciation:

\i-’ra-sə-bəl\

Adjective

Becoming angry easily

Marked by hot temper and easily provoked anger.

Crabby; grumpy; grouchy; choleric; irritable

The irascible man threw the expensive mug at the wall.

“Irascible.” Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. 2008. web. 9 Mar. 2011.

elation noun kalyn goodwin
Elation (Noun) Kalyn Goodwin
  • joyfulness or exaltation of spirit, as from success, pleasure, or relief; high spirits
  • The cat was elated to see the ribbons to play with.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/elation

slide5

Umbrage

um·brage

Micaela Perkins

–noun

1.

offense; annoyance; displeasure: to feel umbrage at a social snub; to give umbrage to someone; to take umbrage at someone's rudeness.

2.

the slightest indication or vaguest feeling of suspicion, doubt, hostility, or the like.

Sentence:

“She took umbrage at his remarks.”

“He felt a great sense of umbrage when the nurse started his IV.”

Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/umbrage

sanguineous
Sanguineous
  • (san-gwen-ee-us)
  • definition: of, relating to, or involving bloodshed
  • synonyms: bloody, homicidal, murderous, bloodthirsty and sanguine.
  • Sources:merriam-webster.com and google
  • Ex: The shark was sanguineous when he saw the fish swim in front of his face.

Cailtin Ramsey

impetuous
Impetuous
  • Adj. of, pertaining to, or characterized by sudden or rash action, emotion, etc.; impulsive: an impetuous decision; an impetuous person.
  • His rush was so impetuous, that he fairly overturned several of his opponents by dashing against them.
  • Dictionary.com

By: Kali Hiser

macabre

The Dance of Death by Michael Wolgemut

Macabre
  • [muh-kah-bruh, -kahb, -kah-ber]
  • –adjective
  • 1. Gruesome and horrifying; ghastly; horrible.
  • 2. Of, pertaining to, dealing with, or representing death, especially its grimmer or uglier aspect.
  • 3. Of or suggestive of the allegorical dance of death.
  • Sentence: One of America's most revered Broadway musicals, Sweeney Todd, is also a macabre tale of revenge..
  • Sources: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/macabre
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Holbein-death.png
  • http://www.wordnik.com/words/macabre/examples?page=3

Katie Spradlin

animosity
Part of Speech: Noun

Pronunciation: [an-uh-mos-i-tee]

Definition: A feeling of strong dislike, ill will, or enmity that tends to display itself in action.

Example: “Avada Kedavra!” Bellatrix shrieked in animosity, pointing her wand at Sirius.

Sources: Dictionary.com, news.bbc.co.uk

Kevin Penn

Animosity
idiomatic id ee uh mat ik
-Idiomatic-[id-ee-uh-mat-ik]

Cheyenne Milan

–adjective

1. peculiar to or characteristic of a particular language or dialect.

2. containing or using many idioms.

3. having a distinct style or character, especially in the arts: idiomatic writing; an idiomatic composer.

  • examples: Its raining cats and dogs.
  • She’s not the sharpest crayon in the box.

He used a idiomatic expression as he told her to break a leg as she took center stage.

Dictionary.com

lugubrious
Lugubrious

[loo-goo-bree-uhs]s

Adjective

-Mournful, dismal, or gloomy, especially in an affected, exaggerated, or unrelieved manner

  • The girl lugubrious after the boy broke up with her.

—Synonyms sorrowful, melancholy

www.dictionary.com

Katie Harrison

facetious

Facetious

fa·ce·tious

   Pronounced[fuh-see-shuhs]

–adjective

1. not meant to be taken seriously or literally: a facetious remark.

2. amusing; humorous

3. lacking serious intent; concerned with something nonessential, amusing, or frivolous: a facetious person.

Leah Caudel

I was being very facetious when I told you your mohawk was really hot.

nefarious

Calvin A. Penn

  • Adjective
  • DefinitionExtremely wicked or villainous; iniquitous; vile; atrocious.
  • Example “Mr. Todd and Ms. Lovett’s nefarious plot included the murdering of his customers and her baking them into pies.”
  • Sources www.dictionary.com

Nefarious

[ni-fair-ee-uh s]

adjective definition lacking in qualities that interest stimulate or challenge dull flat vapid

-AdjectiveDefinition: Lacking in qualities that interest, stimulate, or challenge: DULL, FLAT, VAPID

Sentence: Her painting was very insipid.

Insipid

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/insipid

By: Ann Kauffman

condescending
Condescending

Adjective

Definition: showing or characterized by a patronizing or superior attitude toward others

- Synonyms snobbish, patronizing,totalk down to

Patronize: displaying or indicative of an offensively condescending manner.

They were very condescending toward you.

  • Definition: www.dictionary.com and www.merriam-webster.com
  • Image: http://goinglikesixty.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/condescending.jpg

By: Sammi Jo Johnson

slide16

Bombastic

bom-bas-tik

Adjective:

(of speech, writing, etc.) High-sounding; high-flown; inflated; pretentious

Sample sentence:

The guest speaker dominated conversations with his bombastic tone and overbearing demeanor.

Synonyms:

Pompous, grandiloquent, turgid, florid, grandiose

Gavin West

Source: Dictionary.reference.com

despondent
Despondent

Part of Speech: Adjective

Definition: feeling or showing extreme discouragement, dejection, or depression

The woman was despondent over the death of her husband.

Sources: www.webster.com,www.vision.org Sydney Wininger

slide18

www.google.com/images/forlorn

Forlorn

Pronounced: [fawr-lawrn]

Adjective

Definition:

1. desolate or dreary; unhappy or miserable, as in feeling, condition, or appearance.

2. lonely and sad; forsaken.

3. expressive of hopelessness; despairing

Sentence: She looked so forlorn, so empty like the hope had been sucked out of her.

www.dictionary.com

By: Katie Davis

http://sentence.yourdictionary.com/forlorn

trepidation by jenna hays
Noun: trep-i-dey-shuh n

Tremulous fear, alarm, or agitation; perturbation.

Sources: thenervousbreakdown.com www.dictionary.com

The horse’s open mouth inside the car filled the child with trepidation.

Trepidation By Jenna Hays
slide20

Mr. Spock gave an erudite lecture on the latest discoveries in astrophysics.

LIVE LONG AND PROSPER.

[er-yoo-dahyt, er-oo-]

–adjective

characterized by great knowledge; learned or scholarly: an erudite professor; an erudite commentary.

Wesley Holloway

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/erudite

acerbic
Acerbic
  • Sour or astringent in taste; harsh or severe, as in temper or expression.
  • Astringent: Puckering sensation of the mouth.
  • /əˈsərbik/
  • Adjective
  • The girl remarked how acerbic the War Head tasted.

Dictionary.com

slide22
Adj

Scornfully and condescendingly proud.

1. having or showing arrogance

2.Archaic noble or exalted

The haughty ways she displayed her work turned off her peers freedictionary.com

Haughty

Maeghann Alexander

mirth
Mirth
  • adj- Happiness or enjoyment, especially accompanied by laughter
  • Ex: His intention was to provide a much needed dose of jollity and mirth but his jokes were so bad they simply bored everyone to tears.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/mirth

Lauren Milam

patronizing
adjective

displaying or indicative of an offensively condescending manner

The professor spoke in a very patronizing way to his students.

Sources:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/patronizing

http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/cartoonists/mba/lowres/mban250l.jpg

Patronizing

Perri Collier

slide25

Farcical

By:CassieGlass

  • Definition: resembling farce; ludicrous; absurd; ridiculous.
  • Adjective
  • The playwright's farcical comedy had the audience laughing hysterically.
  • http://dictionary.reference.com
  • http://wiki.answers.com
ecstasy

Jewelia Lindsey

Ecstasy

Ecstasy: a state of being

carried away by

overwhelming

emotion

They believed that through the cultivation of mystical ecstasy they could attain direct communion with God.

Wikipedia.com

candid kan did
Candid[kan-did]

Mariah Perkins

  • - Adjective
  • Definition-
  • 1. frank; outspoken; open and sincere
  • 2. free from reservation, disguise, or subterfuge; straightforward
  • 3.honest; impartial
  • She was very candid about her childhood.

http://www.hellomagazine.com/profiles/oprah-winfrey/

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/candid

didactic dahy dak tik

Didactic[dahy-dak-tik]

–adjective 1. intended for instruction; instructive: didactic poetry.

2. inclined to teach or lecture others too much: a boring, didactic speaker.

3. teaching or intending to teach a moral lesson.

The teacher gave a didactic lecture on the importance of sanitary conditions in bathrooms.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/didactic

Maggie Vaughn

indifferent
Indifferent

Josh Butler

[in-dif-er-uh nt]

Adjective

Without interest or concern; not caring; apathetic

Society is indifferent toward littering.

http://dictionary.reference.com/

http://www.opala.org/

slide30

Ardor

  • - Applied to a very strong feeling about a person or thing. Passion is an intense emotion compelling feeling, enthusiasm, or desire for something.
  • The term is also often applied to a lively or eager interest in or admiration for a proposal, cause, or activity or love - to a feeling of unusual excitement, enthusiasm or compelling emotion, a positive affinity or love, towards a subject, idea, person, or object.
  • The man who headed up the organization was full of ardor to speak at the benefit.

Source: The burning piano from the Keith Emerson CD shoot in Borrego Springs March 2008.

Eric Skipworth

vitriolic
Vitriolic

Adjective

-Abusive nature or expression

-Bitterly scathing; caustic; -Vitriolic criticism.

“I try not to take it personally, but sometimes his comments can be very vitriolic.”

http://www.wordnik.com/words/Vitriolic/defintion/

Abby Rutledge