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WELCOME Applying Wellbeing Data 23 rd November 2011 PowerPoint Presentation
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WELCOME Applying Wellbeing Data 23 rd November 2011

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WELCOME Applying Wellbeing Data 23 rd November 2011

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WELCOME Applying Wellbeing Data 23 rd November 2011

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  1. WELCOME Applying Wellbeing Data 23rd November 2011

  2. Applying Wellbeing data: Knowsley’s approach Richard Holford Public Health Development Manager

  3. Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) • Wellbeing identified as one of 34 high level needs. • Dedicated technical framework / raised profile • Identified gaps in knowledge, understanding and provision • Clear recommendations for commissioners

  4. Joint Strategic Asset Assessment (JSAA) Early stages but have been looking at ways wellbeing can be included in this. Major limitation / issue – not robust to draw down on a locality level.

  5. The contribution of wellbeing to life expectancy: Narrowing the gap in inequalities

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  9. What we know it isn’t Mental well being (WEMWBS) Rates of relative poverty More likely to smoke More likely to be active More likely to be unemployed or in a household with head unemployed Less likely to join sports, religious of education clubs

  10. What we know it could be Less likely to be a harmful drinker Highest likelihood of feeling you belong in your local area Second highest satisfaction with local area as a place to live High assessment of being safe in home at night Highest assessment of being safe outdoors in the day (low; safe outdoors at night) Highest likelihood of talking regularly to neighbours High likelihood of being able to find help in a crisis or if ill

  11. Good guesses Higher level of community cohesion (families, neighbourhoods) Higher level of access to services Improvements in primary care over the period (from low start) Large numbers engaged in prevention services Integration of health and social care

  12. What next? Social networks – building community capacity and social growth Protect integration Mass participation in prevention – community led Access to services – QIPP Research causes - proposal

  13. Applying wellbeing data in Sefton Pat Nicholl Deputy Head of Health Improvement

  14. Sefton Wellbeing Survey 500 face-to-face interviews April–June 2009 Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing Validated scale – WEMWBS + 44 other questions

  15. Warwick and Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Score (WEMWBS) Sefton mean = 27.6 NW mean score = 27.7

  16. Mental Wellbeing distribution More people in Sefton had moderate wellbeing than rest of NW Gender – in Sefton men were significantly more likely to have high mental wellbeing Age – proportion of high mental wellbeing decreased as age increased Deprivation – mental wellbeing reduces as deprivation increases. Ethnicity – lower amongst white than non-white within Regional dataset, not significant in Sefton 8.4% 82% 9.7%

  17. Health Behaviours • Physical activity74% not meeting target. Those with high mental wellbeing were 9 times more likely to meet target • Smoking22% said they currently smoke and 23% were ex-smokers. Those with high mental wellbeing significantly more likely to be ex-smokers. Men were more likely to smoke than women and those aged 25-39 yrs • AlcoholNo significant difference in relation to wellbeing. 6% were hazardous and 3% harmful drinkers. This data is out of line with other public health data on alcohol and reflects the common issue of self-reporting on this topic

  18. Linking public health intelligence Lifestyle Expectancy females in deprived quintiles dipped 2008 & static 2009-10 Liverpool Heart & Chest NHS Trust social marketing programme CVD research by Claro on women’s attitudes

  19. Comparing data sources

  20. Look After Yourself Target population- women 40-60 in Bootle Engagement & consultation-wellbeing insight Proposal: programme based on 5 ways Engage existing community groups Improve wellbeing scores, CVD risk, awareness and prevention

  21. 6 community events targeting 300 women Health checks Holistic therapies Five Ways & wellbeing advice

  22. Health Check Results 157 health checks 38% were referred to GP or other lifestyle agency 28% had increased CVD risk 48% had raised blood glucose 66% were overweight or obese 32% had a medium or high alcohol risk 29% were smokers.

  23. Connect- 80% pledged to connect & improve relationships Be Active –walking most popular pledge Take Notice- appreciate nature Keep Learning- cookery course Give- most popular –’me time Over 50% achieved connect 50% achieved the walking pledge Over 50% achieved take notice and 30% enjoyed time to themselves 20% had signed up to a course in September 2011 66% had given to others and 20% made donations to charity Five Ways Pledges

  24. Mental Wellbeing & Health Behaviours Follow-up wemweb & lifestyle survey Wemweb before 24.7 After 25.2 Shift from 3.5 to 6.1% with higher wellbeing 30% noticed improvement in mental wellbeing Diet & physical activity of over 66% improved 20% improved smoking habits Alcohol unchanged

  25. Next steps Sefton Sanctuary Phase 2 Feedback to participants Creativity & Five Ways Mid-life wellness programme

  26. Mid-life health behaviours

  27. Applying Wellbeing Data CHAMPS 23rd November 2011 Tom Hennell Senior Public Health Analyst Department of Health North West Thomas.hennell@dh.gsi.gov.uk 0776 803 0463 0161 625 7452

  28. ONS Programme: Measuring National Wellbeing • Discussion paper on domains and measures – 31st October 2011. • Response to national debate and research • Consultation until 23rd January 2012. • Sets out domains (aspects of wellbeing) • Proposes headline measures of national wellbeing.

  29. National Wellbeing Framework • Surveyed self-assessed individual wellbeing central to understanding national wellbeing. • Self-assessed wellbeing needs to be understood in terms of a series of individual and reciprocal factors that directly affect it: • Health, relationships, finance, education, work, household • This complex of individual and reciprocal factors is to be understood as relating to social factors within contextual domains; • Equality, Fairness and Sustainability • (Attempts to satisfy both those who seek a psychometric wellbeing measure, and those who regard fairness and sustainability and as irreducible wellbeing determinants)

  30. Proposed Domains • Individual self assessed wellbeing • Life satisfaction, sense of purpose, positive and negative emotions • Factors directly affecting individual wellbeing • Our relationships (family, friends and community) • Health (subjective and objective measures) • What we do (work and leisure) • Where we live (housing and neighbourhood) • Personal finance (income and wealth, both absolute and distribution) • Education and Skills (lifelong stock of human capital) • More Contextual Domains • Governance (democracy and trust) • The economy (economic output and stock) • The natural environment (climate change and sustainability)

  31. Four experimental questions(asked in ONS Opinions Survey 2011) • 'Overall, how satisfied are you with your life nowadays? • Overall, how happy did you feel yesterday? • Overall, how anxious did you feel yesterday? • Overall, to what extent do you feel the things you do in your life are worthwhile?'

  32. Latest segmentation and insight analysis Clare Perkins and Ian Jarman Acknowledgements: Helen Carlin, Simon Chambers , Lynn Deacon and Jude Stansfield North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET

  33. Content Introduction Survey and further analyses - Profiles of wellbeing, what influences wellbeing, employment and resilience, and focus on ethnicity Profiles of wellbeing Influences on wellbeing Employment and resilience Themes North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET

  34. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Introduction • A successful society is one in which people have • high levels of wellbeing which is sustained over time. • Therefore maintaining and improving wellbeing in the • future is important. 2 • Analysis undertaken of the wellbeing survey • - segmentation based on persons responses • - generate insight into the influences on wellbeing 2New Economics Foundation (2011). Measuring our Progress. The Power of Wellbeing. London: NEF.

  35. North West wellbeing survey North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET • Sample 18,500 residents • random selection of LSOA’s within PCT boundary, random selection of households within LSOA, person over 16 in household by next birthday. • minimum of 500 per PCT, 18 PCTs bought at least one sample of at least 500 • Face-to-face interviews: March–June 2009

  36. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) • Developed to measure positive mental health • The survey users a shorter seven question version • Validated scale – WEMWBS (7 item) I’ve been feeling optimistic about the future I’ve been feeling useful I’ve been feeling relaxed I’ve been dealing with problems well I’ve been thinking clearly I’ve been feeling close to other people I’ve been able to make up my own mind about things

  37. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET

  38. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Segmentation analysis “The aim of any segmentation should be to define a small number of groups so that: all members of a particular group are as similar to each other as possible, and they are as different from the other groups as possible”.1 1 Association of Public Health Observatories (2009). Technical Briefing 5 Geodemographic Segmentation [Online]. Available at: www.apho.org.uk/resource/item.aspx?RID=67914

  39. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Cluster and segmentation analysis

  40. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Working Age, Struggling More people live in most deprived areas Less likely to have high life satisfaction Age profile is younger Less likely to be comfortable financially Fewer people have time to do things they enjoy More active physically Wellbeing = 27.6

  41. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Working Age, Comfortable Fewer people over 65 Health is better Fewer financial worries More people in work Fewer people live in most deprived areas More likely to have higher life satisfaction More physically active Wellbeing = 29.2

  42. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Multiple Challenges Even spread of age Financially struggling Very poor health Generally quite anxious Low level of employment Lowest levels of life satisfaction and WEMWBS Wellbeing =20.7

  43. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Retired, Thriving Age profile is older More retired people. Stronger feelings about their area More likely to be satisfied with life More comfortable financially Fair health Wellbeing = 29.0

  44. North West Public Health Observatory Centre for Public Health Liverpool John Moores University Liverpool L3 2ET Segment observations • Clear differences between groups in terms of • - Age • - their perceived financial situation • - Health • - Wellbeing • - level of deprivation in which they live

  45. Health behaviours Those having the lowest levels of wellbeing are more likely to drink at harmful levels Groups with higher wellbeing tend to have more people who demonstrate an ability to change their health behaviour, such as giving up smoking Retired, Coping and Retired, Thriving both have older age profiles, yet the health of those in Retired, Coping is far worse

  46. Segmentation insights a starting point for understanding differences between groups of people highlights groups of factors that may be indicative of a high risk of poor wellbeing and may assist in targeting interventions Changes in factors that influence wellbeing suggest the transitory nature of people between groups