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Figures of Speech. Figures of speech breathe l i f e and c o l o u r into the things we read. It makes the reader or listener use their imagination and understand much more than could be said with just plain words. f igurative language is the opposite of literal language.

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figures of speech

Figures of Speech

Figures of speech breathe

lifeandcolour

into the things we read.

It makes the reader or listener use their imagination and understand much more than could be said with just plain words.

figurative language is the opposite of literal language.

Literal = EXACTLY what it says

Figurative = means something DEEPER than what’s on the surface

In order to appreciate it, we must first be able to

IDENTIFY and UNDERSTAND

the various figures of speech.

personification
Personification

This figure of speech is used when human qualities are given to inanimate objects or animals.

There are certain things humans can do that no other living thing can. Often, in order to awaken the imagination of the reader or listener, the writer will let inanimate objects “act” like humans.

“ ‘Ah, William, we’re weary of weather.’

said the sunflowers, shining with dew…” – William Blake

simile
Simile

A simile is a figure of speech that says one thing is like another thing.

It’s easy to spot – just look for the words:

  • LIKE

or

  • AS

“It’s been a hard day’s night and I’ve been working like a dog.” - The Beatles

metaphor
Metaphor

A simile is a figure of speech that says one thing isanother thing.

It allows use to use fewer word and forces the reader or

listener to find the similarities. The characteristics are

TRANSFERRED from one object to another.

The word metaphor comes from the Greek word: metapherin meaning transfer.

“All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances.” – William Shakespeare

hyperbole
Hyperbole

Hyperbole is a figure of speech that uses an exaggerated and

extravagant statement to create a strong emotional response. In

other words: OVER THE TOP!

It is after all figurative, so it is not meant to be taken literally.

It is frequently used to make something funny 

“Give me a thousand kisses, then a hundred, then another thousand, then a second hundred, then still another thousand, then hundred.” - Catullus

oxymoron
Oxymoron

An oxymoron is a figure of speech that uses two opposite (or contradictory) ideas.

By doing this, the reader or listener creates a new concept or meaning in the mind of the reader. It’s meant to make you think a little!

“The sound of silence.” – Simon and Garfunkel

assonance
Assonance

Assonance is a sound device in which the vowel sounds are repeated.

This creates an internal rhyme.

“That dolphin-torn, that gong-tormented sea…” – WB Yeats

“I must confess that in my quest I felt depressed and restless…” – Thin Lizzy

*remember*

If you are asked to identify assonance in a poem, you MUST

underline or highlight or circle the vowel sound being

repeated. If you don’t, marks will not be awarded.

alliteration
Alliteration

Alliteration is a sound device in which the first consonant sound of words close to one another are repeated.

“Good men are gruff and grumpy, cranky, crabbed and cross.” – Clement Cross

*remember*

If you are asked to identify alliteration in a poem, you MUST underline or highlight or circle the first consonant sound being repeated. If you don’t, marks will not be awarded.

onomatopoeia
Onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia is the figure of speech that occurs when words imitate sounds objects or actions actually make.

“Chug, chug, chug. Puff, puff, puff. Ding-dong, ding-dong. The little train rumbled over the tracks.” – Arnold Munk

figures of speech1
Figures of Speech

And off you go!

You cannow

analyse poetry

so well

that you

would make

Shakespeare

proud.