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Have a Nice Day PowerPoint Presentation
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Have a Nice Day
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  1. Rock in the 1970s Have a Nice Day

  2. Rhythm in late ‘60s-early ‘70s • Polyrhythmic • Sixteen-beat style beat • Syncopated bass lines, guitar riffs • Percussiveness emphasized through various techniques • Choked guitar sound - removes pitch • “Slapped” bass • Short vocal phrases

  3. Last Days of Motown • Motown dominance of charts wanes after 1971 • No single “Motown sound” • Biggest hit makers those who defy or expand “sound of young America”

  4. Stevie Wonder (1950- ) • Signed by Berry Gordy at age 12; billed as “Little Stevie Wonder” • Rebels against Motown formula when contract re-negotiated in 1971

  5. Stevie Wonder - Style • Dense, polyrhythmic textures • On early albums, Wonder plays all instruments • Extensive use of synthesizer • Long, syncopated riffs as foundation • Latin, reggae, and jazz rhythms prominent

  6. Superstition • Sixteen-beat style beat • Strongly accented backbeats • Each 16-bar verse divided into 2 parts • First half: Drums, bass, guitar, synthesizer • Second half: Horn line added; jazz flavor • Locally end-weighted • Verses harmonically static – built on pentatonic scale • Bridge harmonically active • Leads to hook (serves as refrain)

  7. Gospel/Soul • Fusion of soul, gospel, and pop • Personified in Al Green • “Voice of soul in the ‘70s” • Started as gospel singer • Retains gospel traits in secular, romantic songs • Melismas, range of tone colors, techniques • Vocal virtuosity replaces rhythmic drive, lyric message • Ex. Tired of Being Alone

  8. Philadelphia Soul • Philadelphia International Records (PIR) founded in early ‘70s by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff • Closely associated with Philadelphia dance scene

  9. Philadelphia Sound • Heavily produced – thick, “Wall of sound” textures • Tight studio band - MFSB • Mother, Father, Sister, Brother • Riff-driven • Hard, rock-style timekeeping with 16 beat style beat • Ex. The O'Jays, Back Stabbers

  10. FUNK • Fusion of soul, acid rock, and James Brown • Riff-driven polyrhythmic structure • Over minimal harmonies or pentatonic scale • Backbeat avoided in favor of accenting each beat of bar • “Flat four” beat • Key defining characteristic of funk • Ex. Sly and the Family Stone, “Thank You (Falletinme Be Mice Elf Again)”

  11. Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Again) • Primarily 8 bar sections • Some have lyrics on each repetition • Others serve as refrain (“Thank you, falettin me…”) • Polyrhythms; separate patterns of • Guitar • Bass • Various percussion • Great deal of rhythmic layering

  12. Parliament and Funkadelic • Premiere funk bands of 70s, led by George Clinton • Motown roots evident • Glimpses of doo-wop, Brill Building sounds • Also influence from art rock • Mixed meters • Sophisticated jazz rhythms • Shifting patterns of accents • Thick, polyrhythmic textures • Ex. Up for the Down Stroke

  13. Mainstream Rock • Less spontaneity, more focus on finding mainstream audience • Multi-Platinum hits of the mid 1970s • Platinum record – 1 million copies sold • Peter Frampton - Frampton Comes Alive • Fleetwood Mac – Rumors • Reveal the amount of money that could be made from rock music

  14. Pop Rock • Most glam rock • Some singer/songwriters • Paul Simon • Billy Joel • Groups and artists that might be classified as pop or rock • Elton John • Wings • Rod Stewart • Fleetwood Mac

  15. Elton John – Tiny Dancer • Lyric dominates • Verse-transition-refrain • 2 part verse, each AABA • End weighting through gradual addition of instruments, new tone colors • Subtle sixteen-beat rhythmic foundation

  16. Jazz-Rock Fusion • Rock bands influenced by jazz rhythmic and harmonic sophistication • Often jazz players in group • Exs. • Blood, Sweat, and Tears • Chicago • Steely Dan • Ex. Blood, Sweat, and Tears, Spinning Wheel

  17. Spinning Wheel - Form Short intro - crescendo (increase in volume), horns play one measure of 16-beat style beat A: “What goes up…” A: “You got no money…” B: Extensive contrasting section/short bridge A: “Someone is waiting…” A: 1/2 verse as bridge (piano solo) C: solo section: Improvisation on melody by trumpet, 2x through changes, plus extension A: “Someone’s waiting…” D (outro)? Mixed meter stop time, alternating with calliope-like improvisation

  18. “Blue-eyed soul” • White groups influenced by gospel and soul • Doobie Brothers • Dr. John • Ex. Doobie Brothers, Takin' it To the Streets

  19. “Blue-Eyed Soul” • Takin’ it to the Streets • Soulful vocal style delivery • Active bass line, ala Stax Soul • Hammond organ • Backing vocals added in refrain • Extensive syncopation