English for social workers I session 8, 2 dec 2013 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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English for social workers I session 8, 2 dec 2013

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  1. English for social workers Isession 8, 2 dec 2013 Miljen Matijašević E-mail: miljen.matijasevic@gmail.com Office: G10, room 6 (1st floor) Tue, 11:30-12:30

  2. Today’s session Mid-term test results EDUCATION • Education in Croatia • Education in Britain • Education in the USA • The European Higher Education Area

  3. Mid-term test results

  4. Mid-term test results SKALA OCJENA odličan (5) 90 % - 100 % vrlo dobar (4) 80 % - 89 % dobar (3) 70 % - 79 % dovoljan (2) 60 % - 69 % -dovoljan (-2) 50 % - 59 % - uvjetan prolaz nedovoljan (1) do 49 %

  5. Mid-term test results PRISTUPILI 133 – POLOŽILI 96 (+17) odličan (5) 19 (14 %) vrlo dobar (4) 20 (15 %) dobar (3) 31 (23 %) dovoljan (2) 20 (15 %) -dovoljan (-2) 17 (13 %) nedovoljan (1) 20 (15%)

  6. Education in Croatia

  7. Education in Croatia Discuss the following questions with a partner: • What do you know about the school system in Croatia? What levels of education are there? • Which schools are obligatory (compulsory)? • What is special about the organisation of classes in Croatian primary schools? • What types of secondary schools are there?

  8. Education in Croatia Read the text on p. 5 in your books. Underline any unfamiliar words or expressions.

  9. Education in Croatia Explain or translate the following terms: • lifelong education • state-owned school • curriculum • to enrol in a school • to attend school • grammar school • vocational school • craftsmanship school

  10. Education in Croatia Explain or translate the following terms: • lifelong education – cjeloživotno obrazovanje • state-owned school – državna škola • curriculum – nastavni program • to enrol in a school – upisati se u školu • to attend school – pohađati školu • grammar school – gimnazija • vocational school – strukovna škola • craftsmanship school – obrtnička škola

  11. Primary and Secondary schools Primary schools • Classroom teaching (grades 1 to 4) • Subject teaching (grades 5 to 8) Secondary schools • Grammar schools • Vocational schools • Industrial and craftsmanship schools

  12. Higher education Types of higher education institutions in Croatia: • universities (sveučilišta) • faculties • departments, institutes • polytechnics (veleučilišta) • schools of professional higher education (visoke škole)

  13. Higher education • UNIVERSITIES of Zagreb, Osijek, Split, Rijeka, Pula, Dubrovnik and Zadar • Universities include several faculties, which carry out university study programmes and conduct research • Faculties usually consist of departments (odsjek, odjel, katedra)

  14. Higher education • POLYTECHNICS and SCHOOLS OF PROFESSIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION carry out programmes of professional studies • Polytechnics implement programs in at least 3 fields • 11 public polytechnics (e.g. Polytechnic School of Social Sciences in Zagreb – Društveno Veleučilište u Zagrebu) and 7 public schools of professional higher education (e.g. College of Agriculture in Križevci – Visoko gospodarsko učilište u Križevcima)

  15. Higher education PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION • In Croatia there are: • 3 private polytechnics (Polytechnic in Velika Gorica, VERN Business College, Polytechnic for media, business and management) • 25 private schools of professional higher education (e.g. American College of Management and Technology, International Graduate School for Management in Zagreb, RRiF School of Financial Management, etc.)

  16. Education in Croatia Discuss the following questions: • What is your opinion on the school system in Croatia? • What is youropinion on theplannedcompulsorysecondaryschooleducation? • What do you think about the standard of student life in Croatia? Think about study-related facilities and non-study-related features.

  17. Education in Great Britain

  18. Education in Great Britain Discuss the following questions: • Do you think English children are generally better educated than Croatian children? • What do you know about British education? What is Britain famous for in terms of education? • Is compulsory education in Britain longer than in Croatia?

  19. Education in Great Britain Read the text on p. 6 in your books. Underline any unfamiliar words or expressions.

  20. Education in Great Britain Explain or translate the following terms: • to undergo reforms • a school fee, tuition • comprehensive school • statutory subject

  21. Education in Great Britain Explain or translate the following terms: • to undergo reforms – prolaziti kroz reforme • a school fee, tuition – školarina • comprehensive school – opća srednja škola • statutory subject – zakonom propisan predmet

  22. Education in Great Britain Sum up the main differences between the British and Croatian systems of education for: • School-leaving age • Final examination • Vocational vs. general education

  23. Education in Great Britain • Regulated at the national level by the Department for Children, Schools and Families and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills • Educational policy implemented at the local level by the local authorities • Full-time education compulsory until the age of 16, after which many students take the ‘sixth-form college’, which allows them to continue to higher education • School leaving age to be extended to 18

  24. Education in Great Britain • Organised differently throughout the UK, but generally, the organisation is as follows • STATE SCHOOLS • Primary: • infant schools (5-7) • junior schools (7-11) • Secondary (11-16 or 18) • grammar (generally very selective) • comprehensive • secondary modern (generally not very selective)

  25. Education in Great Britain GCSE – General Certificate of Secondary Education • a.k.a. as O-levels • exams taken at 15/16 years of age FURTHER EDUCATION • Sixth-form college (sometimes provided within secondary schools) • At the end of this stage, students take A-level exams (Advanced), which facilitate entry into universities (GSCE-A)

  26. The National Curriculum • Subjects required by the curriculum are the following • English • Mathematics • Science • Art & design • Citizenship • Design & Technology • Geography • History • Information & Communication Technology (ICT) • Modern Foreign Languages • Music • Physical Education

  27. Education in Great Britain • GNVQ – General National Vocational Qualification • Alternative to GSCE – focusing on preparation for specific occupation or further education • Today replaced by BTEC (Business and Technology Education Council) exams or OCR certificates • OCR (Oxford, Cambridge and RSA – Royal Society of Arts) – a UK examination board

  28. Independent Schools • Private-owned schools, tuition can be very high (up to GBP 30,000) • Some are boarding schools (where students live and study), and some are single-sex • Pre-preparatory (4-8) • Preparatory (8-13) • Public schools (13-18) • They are calledpublic schools because they used to be the alternative to private instruction provided at home

  29. Other arrangements • According to law, parents are free to HOMESCHOOL their children • They do not have to be qualified teachers, nor necessarily follow the National Curriculum • They are not allowed to benefit from public funds for this type of education

  30. Higher education • Types of universities in the UK • Oxbridge (Oxford and Cambridge) • The Old Scottish Universities, Early 19th Century English Universities, Redbrick universities (mid-19th c.) MORE RECENT TYPES • Campus universities • Newer civic universities (wide range of study programmes) • The Open University (classes via TV, radio, coursebooks, correspondence)

  31. Education in the USA

  32. Education in the USA Answer the following questions: • Are you aware of any significant differences between education in the USA and Croatia or Europe? • What have you learned about education in the USA and American schools from movies and television?

  33. Education in the USA Read the text on p. 7 • What is the difference between private and public schools? • Summarize: • preschool education • elementary school • secondary school

  34. Education in the USA • Education regulated at federal, state and local levels • This results in certain differences in the organisation of schools • Grades regulated at the federal level • 12 grades of primary and secondary education – split differently across elementary, middle schools, junior and senior high schools, or mixed high schools

  35. Elementary and Secondary Education

  36. Education in the USA • Various school across the country provide instruction in various grades • A lot of variety • Schools offer different facilities, sports teams, advanced classes in certain subjects – all this will influence the choice of school

  37. Education in the USA • Completing secondary education results in GRADUATION – receiving the HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA • High school curriculum regulated at state level – great variety • Public high schools free for all, even foreigners

  38. Higher Education

  39. Education in the USA • HIGHER EDUCATION • COLLEGES (community and junior) – associate degree • UNIVERSITIES – bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, PhD or advanced professional degree (Law, Medicine, Dentistry) • Some colleges offer BA courses of study

  40. Education in the USA • Higher education operates a system of units (credits) • Students attending colleges, wishing to transfer to a BA programme after getting an associate degree must make sure that the units they get are transferrable • Starting at an associate programme and then switching to bachelor programme reduces the cost of study – a popular option

  41. Education in the USA • People studying for a bachelors degree must select a MAJOR (the main subject of study) • Required to take a certain number of courses within that major in order to receive the degree • (e.g. Someone studying for a BS in Chemistry must complete a number of chemistry courses, but also a number of courses in mathematics and physics)

  42. Education in the USA • Bachelor programmes offered by many institutions other than public and private universities, such as: • Liberal arts colleges • Institutes of technology • Religiously affiliated universities • Specialized vocational schools (Julliard – acting, Berkeley – music) • Online colleges and universities

  43. Meaningsof COLLEGE • a school in the U.S. that you go to after high school : a school that offers courses leading to a degree (such as a bachelor's degree or an associate's degree) • a part of an American university that offers courses in a specified subject • a school in Britain that offers advanced training in a specified subject • an independent institution of higher learning offering a course of general studies leading to a bachelor's degree; also:  a university division offering this • an institution offering instruction usually in a professional, vocational, or technical field <business college>

  44. Education in the USA • What are some differencesinthesystemofhighereducationinthe USA compared to Croatia?

  45. The EuropeanHigher Education Area

  46. The Bologna Process (EHEA) • Concept and project of the European Higher Education Area initiated by the Council of Europe (not the EU!!) • 46 countries – signatories to the European Cultural Convention (1954) and the European signatories of the Lisbon Recognition Convention (1997) (also signed by the USA, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Belarus, the Holy See, Kazakhstan, etc.)

  47. The Bologna Process (EHEA) Joint Declaration of the European Ministers of Education • Signed in Bologna in 1999 • MAIN GOAL: to create a single education area by making academic standards compatible and comparable throughout Europe and to implement equitable quality assurance standards

  48. The Bologna Process (EHEA) OBJECTIVES: • Easily readable and comparable degrees organised in a three-cycle structure (bachelor-master-doctorate) • Quality assurance • Recognition of foreign degrees • Enhancing student mobility • Encouraging lifelong learning • Enhancing employability • Development of joint degrees

  49. The Bologna Process (EHEA) • Developed a European qualifications framework implemented nationally • Based on three cycles: bachelor (undergraduate), master (graduate), doctorate (postgraduate) • Cycles based on ECTS (European Credit Transfer System)

  50. The Bologna Process (EHEA) • Bachelor: 180-240 ECTS credits, 3-4 years of study • Master: 90-120 ECTS credits, 1-2 years of study • Doctorate: usually 180-240 ECTS credits, 3-4 years of study