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The New Child Nutrition Program

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  1. The New Child Nutrition Program 2014-2015

  2. Welcome! • Presenters: • Sarah Kenworthy, RD, CD – School Nutrition Program Coordinator • Allie Caito-Sipe– School Nutrition Program Specialist

  3. Agenda • Basics • National School Lunch Program • School Breakfast Program • After School Snack Program • Smart Snacks • Wellness Policies • Other Programs • Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program • Farm to School • Team Nutrition • Smarter Lunchrooms • Let’s Move Salad Bars to the Midwest • Chef Cyndie Recipe Book and Videos

  4. Pop Quiz! • Schools are required to be on the National School Lunch Program. True or False? • False, schools are not required to be on the NSLP or any other program – School Breakfast Program, After School Snack Program, etc.

  5. The Basics for Schools • School Nutrition Programs are Federal Entitlement Programs. • Schools receive reimbursement based on the number of free, reduced, and paid meals provided. • Schools receive additional State funds and USDA commodities. • Schools have access to free training, resources, and assistance to maintain a successful program. • Requirements: • Non-for-profit status, recognized by IDOE, permanent agreement • Process household applications and verify 3% of approved applications • Follow strict meal pattern, complete production records, maintain meal counts • Complete financial reports, undergo audits by IDOE, SBOA, DOH

  6. The Basics for Households • Requirements: • Eligible for free meals through Food Stamps, TANF, or Foster, Homeless, Migrant, or Runaway Status. • Eligible for free or reduced meals based on income information. • Must respond to verification if randomly pulled. • Must reapply each year

  7. National School Lunch Program

  8. NSLP Program Participation in ‘13-14

  9. National School Lunch Program • Meal Pattern • Divided by grade groups: K-5, 6-8, 9-12 • Daily and weekly requirements for: • Grain • Meat and Meat Alternate • Fruit • Vegetables • Milk • Weighted nutrient limits: • Calories • Saturated Fat • Sodium • Trans Fat

  10. Grains • Daily and weekly minimum requirements • Grains counting toward daily and weekly requirements must be whole grain rich. • 50% or more whole grain ingredients by weight • Must limit sweet grains over the week. • Must use Grain chart to determine how the grain credits • Examples of 1 oz. eq. includes: • .8 oz. Croutons • 1 oz. Tortilla • 1.2 oz. Waffle • ½ cup Pasta • 2 oz. Blueberry Muffin

  11. Meat/Meat Alternate • Daily and weekly minimum requirements • Must use food buying guide or Child Nutrition labels to determine crediting • Examples of 1 oz. eq. include: • 1.4 oz. ground beef • 1 oz. cheese • 2 Tbsp. peanut butter • ½ cup yogurt

  12. Fruit • Daily minimum requirements • Fresh, frozen, dried, canned in 100% juice, extra light or light syrup, or water • 100% juice – cannot serve only juice • Use Food Buying Guide to determine crediting • Examples of ½ cup of fruit: • ½ raw unpeeled Apple, 125-138 count • ¼ cup raisins • 4 oz. 100% juice

  13. Vegetables • Minimum daily requirements • Minimum weekly subgroup requirements: • Dark Green – spinach, romaine, broccoli • Red/Orange – carrots, red peppers, sweet potatoes • Bean/Pea (Legume) – garbanzo beans, black-eyed peas, kidney beans • Starchy – potatoes, corn, green peas • Other – green beans, green peppers, cauliflower, celery

  14. Pop Quiz! • Does USDA allow pizza to count as a vegetable in the National School Lunch Program? • We have to think about the components of a pizza: • Crust – counts a grain • Cheese and Meat – counts as meat/meat alternative • Tomato sauce – if at least 1/8 cup of sauce, will count toward the red/orange subgroup. But menu planners need to ensure students have access to other vegetables so they receive their minimum daily requirement.

  15. Milk • Daily requirement: 1 cup • Plain and flavored milk are okay • Plain must be 1% or fat free • Flavored must be fat free • Must offer at least 2 choices

  16. Condiments & Freebies • No limitations but must be included in nutrient analysis • Condiments: salad dressings, ketchup, mayo, mustard, bbq sauce, maple syrup • Non-Grain Freebies: pudding, jello, ice cream • Non-Whole Grain Rich Freebies: pretzels, crackers • Non-Whole Grain Rich Sweet Grain Freebies: cookies, pie, cake* *Must not exceed weekly sweet grain limit.

  17. Pop Quiz! • Students are required to take each component even if they plan to throw it away. True or False? • This depends. If the school is implementing Offer vs. Serve, then students have the ability to decline items they might not eat. They must take at least ½ cup of fruit or vegetables or a combination of both. If the school is not implementing Offer vs. Serve, then the students do need to take each component.

  18. Menu Planning • Menu planners must make sure all potential meals include the minimum portion sizes for all 5 components. • Implementing Offer vs. Serve? • Students only need to take 3 of the 5 components • Must take at least ½ cup of fruit and/or vegetables

  19. School Breakfast Program

  20. SBP Participation in ’13-14 • Indiana law: Public school on the National School Lunch Program that has at least 15% free/reduced rate must implement breakfast. • Private and Charter schools are exempt.

  21. Breakfast Service methods • Breakfast in the Classroom • Grab and Go • Breakfast after 1st Period

  22. School Breakfast Program • Meal Pattern • Divided by grade groups: K-5, 6-8, 9-12 • Daily and weekly requirements for: • Grain • Fruit • Milk • Weighted nutrient limits: • Calories • Saturated Fat • Sodium • Trans Fat

  23. Grain • Daily and weekly minimum requirements • Must offer at least 1 oz. eq. of real grain items with each menu. • May then add meat/meat alternate to breakfast menu and count toward the weekly grain requirement. • Grains counting toward daily and weekly requirements must be whole grain rich. • No sweet grain limitations.

  24. Fruit • Daily minimum requirements • Fresh, frozen, dried, canned in 100% juice, extra light or light syrup, or water • 100% juice – cannot serve only juice • May substitute vegetables for fruit. • If substituting Starchy vegetables, must plan 2 cups of other vegetable subgroups over the week.

  25. Milk • Daily requirement: 1 cup • Plain and flavored milk are okay • Plain must be 1% or fat free • Flavored must be fat free • Must offer at least 2 choices

  26. Menu Planning • Menu planners must make sure all potential meals include the minimum portion sizes for all 3 components. • Implementing Offer vs. Serve? • Must plan 4 items from 3 components. • Students only need to take 3 items on their tray. • Must take at least ½ cup of fruit and/or vegetables

  27. After School Snack Program

  28. ASSP Participation in ‘13-14

  29. After School Snack Program • Requirements: • Must take place after school (there are occasional exceptions) • Program must provide educational or enrichment activity • The program must be open to all students and cannot be limited to those who “make the team” • Must follow meal pattern, keep production records, meal counts

  30. Pop Quiz! • Schools need to have a free/reduced rate of 50% or above to run the After School Snack Program. True or false? • False, as long as the program meets the requirements any school can implement the ASSP. If the school has a f/r rate of 50% or above then the school can provide all of the snacks for free and be reimbursed at the free rate for all students!

  31. Smart Snacks

  32. Smart Snacks • All food and beverages sold to students on school campus, during the school day must meet particular nutrient requirements. • School Day = midnight the day before until 30 minutes after school ends

  33. Smart Snacks Standards • Includes: • A la carte • Fundraisers • Vending Machines • School Stores • Culinary Education Programs • Does not Include: • Brought to school • Given to students with no currency exchange • Sold to adults only

  34. Smart Snacks Standards • Food sold to students must meet: • General Food Standards • Whole grain rich, • First ingredient is dairy, protein, fruit or vegetable, • Combination food with at least ¼ cup fruit/vegetable, or • At least 10% DV of a nutrient of public health concern (dietary fiber, potassium, calcium, vitamin D). • Specific Nutrient Standards • Calories • Total fat • Sat Fat • Trans Fat • Sodium • Total Sugar

  35. Smart Snacks Standards • Beverages sold to elementary and middle school students must be: • Water (carbonated or non-carbonated) • 100% Juice (carbonated or non-carbonated) • Milk (1% or fat free) • Beverages sold to high school students include the above and: • No Calorie – 20 fl. oz. and 10 calorie maximum • Low Calorie – 12 fl. oz. and 60 calorie maximum

  36. Fundraisers • Indiana will allow each school building 2 fundraiser exemptions per school year. • 1 exemption is for 1 day. • Food or beverages that do not meet the smart snacks requirements will either need to receive an exemption or will have to be sold 30 minutes after school is over.

  37. Wellness Policies

  38. School Wellness Policies • On June 30, 2004, the President signed the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004. Section 204 of this law required school districts participating in the national school meals program to establish a local school wellness policy by school year 2006. • This was reinforced and expanded in the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010.

  39. School Wellness Policies • 514 people from 309 schools were trained through our 18 regional Wellness Workshops. • Staff members from all areas of the school were being represented such as administrators, schools nurses, physical education and other types of teachers.

  40. School Wellness Policies • Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA) now requires that the local school wellness policy, at a minimum, include the following requirements… Wellness Committee consisting of… • Parents • Students • School Food Authority Representatives • PE Teachers (NEW*) • School Health Professionals (NEW*) • School Board • School Administrators • General Public

  41. School Wellness Policies Content for… • Nutrition Promotion (NEW*) • Nutrition Education • Physical Activity • Other School-Based Activities that promote student wellness Need two or more goals listed under each section in order to meet the requirements of the Law.

  42. School Wellness Policies Monitor, Assess, & Evaluate (NEW*) • Have a plan for measuring effectiveness, that is measured periodically - using an evaluation tool • Designate a person responsible for monitoring policy to ensure that each school complies • Form an annual progress report

  43. School Wellness Policies Public Updates (NEW*) Inform & update … • Parents • students • Staff • community about the content and implementation USDA Requirements: Has assured that the School Meals meet the USDA requirements Nutrition Guidelines: Include nutrition guidelines to promote student health and reduce childhood obesity for all foods available in each school district

  44. School Wellness Policies DOE Oversight • Included as part of the administrative review • Every 3 years

  45. Other Programs

  46. Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program • The goal of the FFVP is to expose elementary-aged students to fresh fruits and vegetables. • Students receive free fresh fruits and vegetables at least twice per week – in addition to all of their other meal programs.

  47. Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program • Requirements • At least 50% free/reduced rate (84% cut-off this year) • Elementary-aged students only (PK-6) • On the NSLP and/or SBP • Provide fresh fruit and vegetables, • Funding • Annual allocation from USDA to each state • $50-$75 per student • Start with the highest free/reduced rate schools and work way down until out of funds • 2014-15 School Year • 114 schools awarded • 23 new schools

  48. Farm to School • Farm to school enriches the connection communities have with fresh, healthy food and local food producers by changing food purchasing and education practices at schools and preschools. • Indiana Farm to School Network

  49. Farm to School • The Indiana Farm to School Network will be promoting Food Day in the month of October featuring the incredible turnip. • sampling raw turnips in the classroom • serving turnips in the cafeteria • growing turnips in the school garden • a celebration complete with music and turnip decorations • National Farm to School - www.farmtoschool.org • Indiana Department of Education - www.doe.in.gov/nutrition/farm-school • USDA Farm to School Census - http://www.fns.usda.gov/farmtoschool/census#/

  50. Team Nutrition • Supports the Child Nutrition Programs through training and technical assistance for foodservice, nutrition education for children and their caregivers, and school and community support for healthy eating and physical activity. • 72 Indiana School met the HealthierUSSchool Challenge - http://www.fns.usda.gov/hussc/healthierus-school-challenge-indiana-award-winners • USDA Team Nutrition - http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/team-nutrition