Flexural Structure Systems, Beams - including SAP2000 (rev ed.), by Wolfgang Schueller - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Flexural Structure Systems, Beams - including SAP2000 (rev ed.), by Wolfgang Schueller

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  1. FLEXURAL STRIUCTURE SYSTEMS B E A M S including SAP2000 Prof. Wolfgang Schueller

  2. For SAP2000 problem solutions refer to “Wolfgang Schueller: Building Support Structures – examples model files”: https://wiki.csiamerica.com/display/sap2000/Wolfgang+Schueller%3A+Building+Su pport+Structures+- If you do not have the SAP2000 program get it from CSI. Students should request technical support from their professors, who can contact CSI if necessary, to obtain the latest limited capacity (100 nodes) student version demo for SAP2000; CSI does not provide technical support directly to students. The reader may also be interested in the Eval uation version of SAP2000; there is no capacity limitation, but one cannot print or export/import from it and it cannot be read in the commercial version. (http://www.csiamerica.com/support/downloads) See also, (1) The Design of Building Structures (Vol.1, Vol. 2), rev. ed., PDF eBook by Wolfgang Schueller, 2016, published originally by Prentice Hall, 1996, (2) Building Support Structures, Analysis and Design with SAP2000 Software, 2nd ed., eBook by Wolfgang Schueller, 2015. The SAP2000V15 Examples and Problems SDB files are available on the Computers & Structures, Inc. (CSI) website: http://www.csiamerica.com/go/schueller

  3. Structure Systems & Structure Behavior INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURAL CONCEPTS SKELETON STRUCTURES Axial StructureSystems Beams Frames Arches Cable-supported Structures SURFACE STRUCTURES Membranes: beams, walls Plates: slabs Hard shells Soft shells: tensile membranes Hybrid tensile surface systems: tensegrity SPACE FRAMES LATERAL STABILITY OF STRUCTURES • • • • • • • • • •

  4. A X IA L S T R U C T U R E S Y S T E M S TENSILE MEMBERS COMPRESSIVE MEMBERS L I NE E L E M E NT S BEAMS F LE X U R A L S T R U C T U R E S Y S T E M S F LE X U R A L-A X IA L S T R U C T U R E S Y S T E M S BEAM-COLUMN MEMBERS FRAMES T E N S ILE M E M BR A N E S SOFT SHELLS SUR F A CE E L E M E NT S MEMBRANE FORCES P LA T E S SLABS, MEMBRANE BENDING and TWISTING S H E LLS RIGID SHELLS

  5. FLEXURAL STRUCTURE SYSTEMS B E A M S There are infinitely many types of beams. They may be hidden or exposed; they may form rigid solid members, truss beams, or flexible cable beams. They may be part of a repetitive framing grid (e.g., parallel or two-way joist systems) or represent individual members. They may support ordinary floor and roof structures or span a stadium; they may form a stair, a bridge, or bridge-type buildings that span space; they distinguish themselves in material, construction, and shape. Beams may be not only common beams, but may be spatial members, such as folded plate and shell beams (e.g., corrugated sections), or space trusses. The longitudinal profile of beams may be shaped in funicular form in response to a particular force action, which is usually gravity loading; that is, the beam shape matches the shape of the moment diagram to achieve constant maximum stresses.

  6. BEAMSmay not only be the common, • planar beams • spatial beams (e.g. folded plate, shell beams , corrugated sections • space trusses. They may be not only the typical rigid beams but may be flexible beams such as • cable beams. The longitudinal profile of beams may be shaped as a funicular form in response to a particular force action, which is usually gravity loading; that is, the beam shape matches the shape of the moment diagram to achieve constant maximum stresses.

  7. Beams may be part of a repetitive grid (e.g. parallel or two-way joist system) or may represent individual members; they may support ordinary floor and roof structures or span a stadium; they may form a stair, a bridge, or an entire building. In other words, there is no limit to the application of the beam principle. The following slides represent: 1.Case studies as described above presented in a casual fashion 2. Basic beam mechanics including SAP2000 examples

  8. The Parthenon, Acropolis, Athens, 448 B.C., Ictinus and Callicrates

  9. Shanghai-Pudong International Airport, Paul Andreu principal architect, Coyne et Bellier structural engineers

  10. Berlin

  11. Breuer chair, 1928 Wassily chair, 1925, Marcel Breuer

  12. Barcelona chair, 1929, Mies van der Rohe

  13. Calder mobile, Hirschorn Museum, Washington, 1935

  14. tizio table lamp, Richard Sapper, 1972

  15. stationary tower cranes vs. mobile cranes

  16. SIMPLE and CONTINUOUS FLOOR BEAMS

  17. Atrium, Germanisches Museum, Nuremberg, Germany, 1993, me di um Architects

  18. Incheon International Airport, Seoul, S. Korea, 2001, Fentress Bradburn Arch.

  19. Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Genoa, Italy, 1991, Renzo Piano Arch

  20. HDI-Gerling HQ, Hanover, Germany, 2010, Ingenhoven Arch, Werner Sobek Struct Eng

  21. Petersbogen shopping center, Leipzig, 2001, HPP Hentrich-Petschnigg

  22. Petersbogen shopping center, Leipzig, 2001, HPP Hentrich-Petschnigg

  23. Petersbogen shopping center, Leipzig, 2001, HPP Hentrich- Petschnigg

  24. TU Munich, Germany

  25. Auditorium Maximum, TU Munich, 1994, Rudolf Wienands

  26. CUMT, Xuzhou, China 2005

  27. Chongqing Airport Terminal, 2005, Llewelyn Davies Yeang and Arup

  28. Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport - 2, 2004, Parsons Brinckerhoff + URS Corporation (preliminary design) Arch + Struct. Eng

  29. Potsdammer Platz, Berlin, 1998, Richard Rogers

  30. Ningbo downtown, 2002, Qingyun Ma

  31. Wanli University, Ningbo

  32. Atrium, Germanisches Museum, Nuremberg, Germany, 1993, me di um Arch.

  33. Pedestrian bridge over the Pegnitz Nuremberg

  34. Cologne/Bonn Airport, Germany, 2000, Helmut Jahn Arch., Ove Arup USA Struct. Eng.

  35. Marie-Elisabeth-Lüders-Steg, Berlin, 2003, Axel Schultes Arch

  36. Ski Jump Berg Isel, Innsbruck, 2002, Zaha Hadid

  37. Library University of Halle, Germany

  38. Sobek House, Stuttgart, 2000, Werner Sobek

  39. The New Renzo Piano Pavilion at the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, TX, 2013, Renzo Piano Arch

  40. FM Constructive system, Elmag plant, Lissone, Milano, 1964, Angelo Mangiarotti Arch

  41. Cable Works (Siemens AG), Mudanya, Turkey, 1965, Hans Maurer Arch

  42. Moscone South (upper lobby), San Francisco, 1981, Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum

  43. Philharmonie Berlin, 1963, Hans Scharoun Arch, Werner Koepcke Struct. Eng.

  44. British Pavillion Sevilla Expo 92, Nicholas Grimshaw Arch

  45. Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver, Canada, 1976, Arthur Erickson Arch

  46. Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth, TX, 2002, Tadao Ando Arch, Thornton Tomasetti Struct. Eng