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The Effects of Peer Tutoring Training on Increased Socialization in Free Play Settings with Children Diagnosed with Auti PowerPoint Presentation
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The Effects of Peer Tutoring Training on Increased Socialization in Free Play Settings with Children Diagnosed with Auti

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The Effects of Peer Tutoring Training on Increased Socialization in Free Play Settings with Children Diagnosed with Auti - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The Effects of Peer Tutoring Training on Increased Socialization in Free Play Settings with Children Diagnosed with Auti
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  1. For more information, contact: Shema Kolainu- Hear Our Voices Gili P. Rechany Educational Director Tel. 718-686-9600 ext.133 Fax 718-686-6161 E-mail grechany@skhov.org Poster No. Gili Rechany M.A., BCBA, Chanie Stolik M.A., Chanie Kessler Shema Kolainu-Hear Our Voices, Brooklyn, New York The Effects of Peer Tutoring Training on Increased Socialization in Free Play Settings with Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders Abstract The current investigation focuses on conditioning peers as reinforcers through peer tutoring training. Two school age students and four preschool students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) participated in the study. Reinforcement schedules were monitored by the trainer and implemented by the tutor who presented mastered targets to the tutee. The effects of peertutoring on increased socialization in free play settings for both the tutor and the tutee were measured once criteria was met on reinforcement delivery in peer tutoring sessions. Following the training, an increase across all social interactions measured was noted across all three sets of peers. • Experimental Design • Data Collection • Independent variable: Peer Tutoring • Dependent variable: Socialization in Free play settings • Interobserver Agreement • Interobserver agreement was calculated for 63% of all baseline and training sessions • Interobserveragreement for training sessions was calculated to be 93%. • Interobserveragreement for baseline sessions was calculated to be 100%. • Design • A multiple baseline design across participants was used to show the relationship between the independence and the dependent variable. • Procedures • Baseline.The number of social interactions made across five, five minute observations between the peers selected. • Social Interactions included: • Initiations- the student initiating contact by exchanging a toy or by emitting a vocal antecedents. • Reciprocation- the student responds to a peer’s initiation by engaging in the identified task • Name ID- name calling while sitting in the play area • Training Procedures • Peer Tutoring training. Prompt fading was used to teach the tutor to deliver reinforcement to the tutee on an FR1 schedule. Already mastered targets were presented to the tutee by the tutor and immediately following each behavior the tutor would deliver a reinforcer to the student. • Phase I included a full physical prompt to the tutor by the observer. • Phase II included a partial physical prompt paired with a verbal prompt. • Phase III include only a verbal prompt presented by the observer. • Phase IV included independent delivery of reinforcement • on FR1 schedule. • Criteria were set at 90% times two consecutive sessions • for all phases. All sessions include 20 trials presented by the tutor. Results Tutors Tutees • Method: Participants • Four preschool boys and two school age boys diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) participated in this study. • The students were chosen because they do not initiate play independently with their peers, but they do parallel play with similar toys. • The participants were selected based on teacher’s analysis that the prerequisites of appropriate play with numerous toys were mastered independently. In addition, similar levels of verbal behaviors were identified with both participants. • Method: Setting • Shema Kolainu- Hear Our Voices • All sessions were conducted in the participants’ classroom. The students are in a self-contained class for students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. • The classroom contained four additional children, one teacher and three teaching assistants • Method: Materials • Teacher made stimulus were used to make the multiple exemplar programs used for tutoring sessions. • Blocks and Lego • Data forms were used to record the number of reinforcements delivered by the tutor. • A mechanical clicker and a timer were used in all play area sessions. • Discussion • Teacher Observations • The tutor and the tutee engaged in appropriate social communication through the day. • The tutee tacted the tutors behavior repeatedly throughout the day. • Increased eye contact during group activities and Gym time • Future Interventions • Video Modeling • Observational Learning • References • Gumpel, T.P. & Frank, R. (1999). An expansion of the peer-tutoring paradigm: Cross-age peer tutoring of social skills among socially rejected boys. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 32, 115-118. • Kamps, D. M., Barbetta, P. M., Leonard, B. R., & Delquadri, J. (1994). Class wide peer tutoring: An integration strategy to improve reading skills and promote peer interactions among students with autism and general education peers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27, 49-61. • Odom, S. L., Chandler, L. K., Ostrosky, M., McConnell, S. R., & Reaney, S. (1992). Fading teacher prompts from peer-initiation interventions for young children with disabilities. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 307-317. • Stewart, G., Van Houten, R., & Van Houten, J. (1992). Increasing generalized social interactions in psychotic and mentally retarded residents through peer-mediated therapy. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 335-339.