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Exploring Canterbury. A Study of The Canterbury Tales. Table of Contents. The Journey Begins . . . England in the Middle Ages Focus question Geoffrey Chaucer The Canterbury Tales Travelers to Canterbury

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a study of the canterbury tales

Exploring Canterbury

A Study of The Canterbury Tales

table of contents
Table of Contents
  • The Journey Begins . . .
  • England in the Middle Ages
  • Focus question
  • Geoffrey Chaucer
  • The Canterbury Tales
  • Travelers to Canterbury
  • Chaucer’s Middle Ages Population
  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
  • The Green Knight
  • Sir Gawain
  • Works Cited
the journey begins

The Journey Begins . . .

In October 1066, a daylong battle near Hastings, England, changed the course of history.

england in the middle ages
England in the Middle Ages
  • Feudalism replaced the Nordic social system.
    • The primary duty of males above the serf class was to serve in the military—Knighthood.
    • Women had no political rights.
    • Chivalry and courtly love served as the system of social codes
england in the middle ages1
England in the Middle Ages
  • Lower, middle, and upper-middle classes developed in the cities.
england in the middle ages2
England in the Middle Ages
  • The Crusades extended from 1095-1270.
    • They brought contact with Eastern mathematics, astronomy, architecture, and crafts.
england in the middle ages3
England in the Middle Ages
  • The Magna-Carta defeated papal central power.
england in the middle ages4
England in the Middle Ages
  • The Hundred Years’ War (1337-1453) was the first national war waged by England.
england in the middle ages5
England in the Middle Ages
  • The Black Death (1348-1349) brought the end of the Middle Ages.

Fleas on rats carried the bubonic plague which killed thousands of people. in Europe.

how do the writings of the middle ages represent the lives loves loyalties and humor of humanity

How do the writings of the Middle Ages represent the lives, loves, loyalties, and humor of humanity?

Discover the answer by reading The Canterbury Tales and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

geoffrey chaucer c 1343 1400
Geoffrey Chaucerc. 1343-1400
  • Considered the father of English
  • Wrote in the vernacular
  • Served as a soldier, government servant, and member of Parliament
  • Introduced iambic pentameter
  • First writer buried in Westminster Abbey

Learn more about Chaucer. Go to. . .

http://www.unc.edu/depts/chaucer/index.html

the canterbury tales snapshot of an age
The Canterbury Tales: Snapshot of an Age
  • It frames a story of characters on a religious pilgrimage to Canterbury.
  • The characters are a concise portrait of an entire nation.
  • The pilgrimage is a quest narrative that moves from images of spring and awakening to penance, death, and eternal life.
  • The characters tell stories that reflect “everyman” in the universal pilgrimage of life.
slide18

Tale Types:

Allegory: an extended metaphor that uses persons and objects as examples of abstract concepts.

2. Beast Fable: a story in which all or most of the characters are animals who behave like humans, creating a satire or parody of serious literature

Fabliaux: a comic folk tale with satire and base humor, often at the expense of a fool or naive character.

Exemplum/Sermon: a morality tale or anecdote that relates a single focused incident with an illustrative purpose.

5. Courtly Romance: "Romance" originally referred not to a specific literary genre but to the vernacular French language which was called romanz (meaning that it was derived from the language spoken by the Romans, i.e. Latin). French and other languages derived from Latin, such as Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, are still referred to as "Romance Languages" today. In the 12th century, literature which was written down in the French vernacular was referred to as "romance" to distinguish it from "real" literature, which was invariably written in Latin. Gradually, the term "romance" began to refer not to any narrative written in the French vernacular, but to the specific sort of narrative literature that was most popular among the French-speaking court audiences of France and Anglo-Norman England: stories of the chivalric adventures of knights and their ladies, often set at the court of King Arthur.

works cited home
Works Cited Home
  • Brown, Ian. “The Green Knight.” 2002. May 16, 2003 <http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/gawmenu.htm>.
  • “Geoffrey Chaucer.” Elements of Literature Sixth Course. Ed. Robert R. Hoyt. Austin, 1977. T99.
  • Pyle, Howard. “Sir Gawain the Son of Lot, King of Orkney.” 1903. May 16, 2003 <http://wwwlib.rochester.edu/camelot/gawmenu.htm>.
  • “The Canterbury Tales: A Snapshot of an Age.” Elements of Literature Sixth Course. Ed. Robert R. Hoyt. Austin, 1977. T101-T104.
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Invaluable Chaucer websites:

http://teachers2.wcs.edu/high/rhs/stefaniep/English%20IV/The%20Canterbury%20Tales%20characters.pdf

http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/nael/noa/audio.htm

http://afdtk.uaa.alaska.edu/pedagogy.htm