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Establishing a Reading Workshop in Your Classroom
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  1. Establishing a Reading Workshop in Your Classroom Ellen Larsen ELARSEN@AISQ.QLD.EDU.AU

  2. What is a Reading Workshop? • A time for the students to read, read, read! • A time to work with small groups in Guided Reading and Focused teaching groups • A time for students to apply taught strategies independently • A time for students to read with a small group or with a buddy • A time for students to meaningfully discuss literature Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  3. What happens during a Reading Workshop? Focus Mini Lesson- Whole Class Individualised Daily Reading Guided Reading Groups Sharing and Reflection Time- Whole Class Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  4. http://www.choiceliteracy.com/public/1486.cfm Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  5. Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  6. Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  7. Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  8. Mini-Lesson • This is a 20 minute whole class teaching session in response to a class need identified through data collection and observation. • Comprehension Fix-up Strategies • Comprehension Focus Lessons • Word Attack Strategies • using Big books, picture books, digital texts … Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  9. Guided Reading • This is where the students move off from the whole class context. The teacher plans for a group of students with like reading needs to work with the teacher in a guided reading session (about 15 minutes). This group works on a particular skill or strategy at an instructional level of text. • Contextualisation and Purpose • Whisper reading and teacher conferring • Discussion and reflection • Response Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  10. What is guided reading? • Teacher works with 4-6 students in each group. • Children are grouped according to similarities in reading development and instructional reading levels or comprehension needs. • Teacher introduces stories, strategies, and concepts within group to increase independent application in appropriate leveled text. • Every child reads and is supported by teacher. • Emphasis is on strategic problem • solving within appropriate leveled text. Guided Reading IS NOT round robin reading! Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  11. What are the benefits of guided • reading instruction? • Students develop into independent readers while being supported. • Students have more opportunities to independently use learned strategies (decoding and comprehension strategies), with support. • Instruction can occur at 1-2 levels above independent level- extending vocabulary • Teacher can observe the four components of reading- • Decoding, fluency, comprehension and vocabulary • RUNNING RECORDS Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  12. How are guided reading books selected? • Always by the teacher! • High interest • Text type • Level of difficulty- vocabulary, sentence structure, text format and features Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  13. How are guided reading lessons structured? • Before Reading: A rich introduction must be provided through: • Looking at the title and front cover • Activating prior knowledge • Asking questions (children) • Making Connections • Making predictions • Revising taught reading strategies for reading • Scaffolding any difficult vocabulary/sentence or text features • Goals for the reading developed Think of the discussion from this text! Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  14. Initial Reading: Children read! • Students read individually (not round robin)- for a set amount of text. • You ask each child to read a small portion of the text aloud just to you (after some time to read silently) to ascertain the appropriateness of the text. • Confer with individual students. • Note any strategic needs for discussion. • Follow- up to Initial Reading: • Mini-lesson on decodingstrategies (2-3 mins) thatneed attention eg. Reading on, chunkingbigwords. • Discuss meaning of text so far, making reference to small group comprehension focus eg. inferring Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  15. Completing the Reading-Independently • Students spread out to finish reading the text • Whilst students are doing this, do a running record on a child as they read aloud to you- approximately 100 words. • Spend the rest of the time conferring with the individual students as they need help. • Students may not get to read • the entire text if it is long. Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  16. After Reading: • Lead or monitor a discussion about the meaning of the text and the author’s craft (comprehension). • Help students to reflect on themselves as • text problem-solvers (decoding) • Discuss unknown words and meanings in context (vocabulary) • Reread special sections chorally (fluency). • Provide support for related text choices in independent reading http://resources.curriculum.org/secretariat/snapshots/primaryliteracy.html Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  17. Independent Daily Reading Those students not involved in a guided reading group or a small book club discussion group are busy reading independently. This could be in “book nooks” around the room. These students choose a text of their own and may be given a task to complete during this time related to reading strategies taught, or directly linked to the mini-lesson. It is important that the task does not detract from the opportunity for the independent reading of “continuous text” at a “just right “ level. Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  18. How Do Students Choose A “Just Right” Text? • Children require explicit teaching about how to choose appropriate texts for their independent reading. This requires students to choose a texts based upon • interest • prior knowledge • purpose • level (five finger test) Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  19. Reading Response Journals • The Response Journal • provides : • A place for students to reflect on and record their thinking using a range of taught strategies • An ongoing record of the reader’s thinking and ability to independently apply taught strategies Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  20. Literature Circles/ Book Clubs You may also wish to have a small group involved in a book discussion based around a class novel or a particular text. This could be led by another adult such as a teacher aide or by the children themselves. Such discussions are planned and developed to lead the students to meaningful dialogue about quality texts. Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  21. Literature Circles Book Clubs Purpose Participation Planning Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  22. Both Book Clubs and Literature Circles have these common attributes: • PURPOSE: • To encourage wide reading • To generate deep discussion about the meaning of texts and the author’s craft • To create reading communities within the classroom • PARTICIPATION • To encourage all students to take an active role in reading • To empower all students to have a voice in discussions on a regular basis (eg. weekly) • To allow for the gradual release of responsibility from the teacher to the students with regard to discussions and text choice • For students to self evaluate and set goals for the group • PLANNING • Careful planning in order to provide all students with access to texts (reading independently/reading with/ reading to at school or at home) • Explicit teaching of the process and roles/ protocols • Grouping- small, temporary, heterogeneous Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  23. Whole Group-Small group • Teacher reads aloud • Children meet in groups of 4 to talk about text for 10-15 mins • Teacher moves from group to group • Children draw or write about their thinking What about Prep and Year 1? • Small Group Choice • Children choose a wordless picture book • Children talk for 10-15 mins • Text Set Small Groups • Children with same stories, authors or illustrators talk about their particular book in a small group • Children ask questions and share their thinking • Pair Share • Pairs select the same book • Children talk together for 10-15 mins about their thinking • Pairs then share something with the rest of the class or another pair Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  24. Sharing Time • This is the time to share the learning that has occurred during the workshop. Sharing ideas include sharing: • Independent reading tasks eg. A graphic organiser of information developed in response to a non-fiction text from one of the independent readers • Learning that occurred as the teacher conferred with an independent reader eg. Sam, could you tell everyone about that inference you made- it was amazing! • An observation during Guided Reading eg. John, could you share what we found worked really well in our decoding work today? • Some of the important points made during a book club meeting eg. Can you tell us one important thing that you found out about the text today? • Free sharing- has anyone got something they learned or did today that they would like to share? • Book recommendations eg. Does anyone • want to recommend a text for the class? Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  25. Launching a Reading Workshop • The success and effectiveness of the • reading workshop is dependent upon: • The explicit teaching of necessary skills • The establishment of clear expectations • The development of routines • The organisation of the classroom and resources within the workshop space • Clear and Purposeful planning • Commitment to the benefits of such practice Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  26. “Setting Up the Reading Workshop” Mini-Lessons • What does independent reading look and sound like? (RULES) • What do I do during independent reading? (RESPONSIBILITIES) • How do I choose a just right book? (SKILLS) • Where do I get the resources I need to complete my task? (ORGANISATION) • Where do I go after that? • How long do I have? Where do I • put my work? (ROUTINES) • DO NOT RUSH THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  27. http://www.wrsd.net/literacy/launch.cfm Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au

  28. Video CLIP AN ESSENTIAL WEBSITE http://hill.troy.k12.mi.us/staff/bnewingham/myweb3/FrameBoxes.htm Ellen Larsen elarsen@aisq.qld.edu.au