slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Shappell 1997 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Shappell 1997

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 20

Shappell 1997 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 66 Views
  • Uploaded on

ALCOHOL AND THE NAVAL AVIATOR : WHAT THE 12-HOUR BOTTLE-TO-BRIEF RULE REALLY MEANS. SCOTT SHAPPELL, Ph.D. NAVAL SAFETY CENTER. Shappell 1997. THE VESTIBULAR APPARATUS. HAIR CELLS The Tiny Accelerometer. Acceleration versus Velocity. Otolith Organs (Macula). Acceleration versus Velocity.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Shappell 1997' - wheatley


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

ALCOHOL AND THE NAVAL AVIATOR:

WHAT THE 12-HOUR BOTTLE-TO-BRIEF RULE REALLY MEANS

SCOTT SHAPPELL, Ph.D.

NAVAL SAFETY CENTER

Shappell 1997

slide3

HAIR CELLS

The Tiny Accelerometer

slide5

Acceleration versus Velocity

Otolith Organs (Macula)

slide6

Acceleration versus Velocity

Semi-circular Canals

slide7

Vision

Vestibular

Apparatus

VESTIBULAR

SYSTEM

Auditory

Proprioceptive

BUILDING THE PERFECT ORIENTATION DEVICE

Components of the Vestibular System

slide8

Vision

Cortical

Vestibular

Apparatus

VESTIBULAR

SYSTEM

Auditory

Proprioceptive

DON’T FORGET THE “COCONUT” INPUT

slide9

Vision

Cortical

Vestibular

Apparatus

VESTIBULAR

SYSTEM

Auditory

Proprioceptive

Vomiting Center

When Components Disagree...

slide10

ALCOHOL AND THE VESTIBULAR SYSTEM:

AN EXAMPLE OF SENSORY MISMATCH

Vision

Vision

Cortical

Cortical

Vestibular

Apparatus

Vestibular

Apparatus

VESTIBULAR

SYSTEM

Auditory

Auditory

Proprioceptive

Proprioceptive

Puke, spew, up-chuck, blow chunks,ralph, ...

slide11

Engage your coconut!

Open your eyes, watch TV!

Vision

Vision

Vision

Cortical

Cortical

Cortical

Vestibular

Apparatus

Vestibular

Apparatus

VESTIBULAR

SYSTEM

Auditory

Auditory

Auditory

Proprioceptive

Proprioceptive

Proprioceptive

Turn up the volume

Put your foot on the floor!

Puke, spew, up-chuck, blow chunks,ralph, ...

Puke, spew, up-chuck, blow chunks,ralph, ...

Puke, spew, up-chuck, blow chunks,ralph, ...

SO WHAT CAN WE DO?

slide12

Vision

Vision

Vision

Cortical

Cortical

Cortical

Vestibular

Apparatus

Vestibular

Apparatus

Vestibular

Apparatus

VESTIBULAR

SYSTEM

Auditory

Auditory

Auditory

Proprioceptive

Proprioceptive

Proprioceptive

SO WHAT CAN WE DO?

slide13

So how long does it take to clear your endolymphatic fluid of alcohol?

36 hours

24 hours

6 hours

12 hours

48 hours

slide15

Alcohol before flying, a ticking time-bomb...

Simply relying on hangover effects like a headache is not sufficient to determine if you should not be flying.

slide16

So how do you know when you’re still suffering from the side effects of alcohol? Here’s some home tests that may help!

  • The Shappell Maneuver
  • DUI Test
slide18

SENSORY MISMATCH

SENSORY MATCH

Same Direction as

Head Tilt

Visual Field Rotation

Head Tilt

Visual Field Rotation

Opposite to

Head Tilt

Head Tilt

SENSORY THEORY OF MOTION SICKNESS

slide19

SIMULATOR SICKNESS

  • Some pilots who rarely become ill in actual flight, report that they become motion sick in the simulator.
  • Presumably, even though the visual cues accurately represent those which are normally encountered in actual flight, the vestibular cues are absent, hence a visual-vestibular mismatch exists.
  • As expected, pilots with the most experience in the cockpit have the most difficulty with simulator sickness. For experienced pilots the absence of vestibular cues represents a greater mismatch compared with previous experience than would be the case for novice pilots.
  • Curiously, experience in either the simulator or actual flight reduces sickness for that particular condition, but increases the probability of discomfort in the other condition. It appears that experience with a particular pattern of interaction provides a baseline of normal "expectations" so that any deviation then becomes a mismatch.
slide20

CHEERS

Shappell 1997