secondary cohort reading and writing expository texts writing to persuade n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Secondary Cohort: Reading and Writing Expository Texts—Writing to Persuade PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Secondary Cohort: Reading and Writing Expository Texts—Writing to Persuade

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 29

Secondary Cohort: Reading and Writing Expository Texts—Writing to Persuade - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 168 Views
  • Uploaded on

Secondary Cohort: Reading and Writing Expository Texts—Writing to Persuade. Michelle Fowler-Amato Lynn Masterson Heart of Texas Writing Project December 7 & 8, 2011. Agenda . 8:30 – 9:00 Feature Article & Notebook 9:00 – 10:00 Reading Workshop: Editorial 10:00 – 10:15 Break

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Secondary Cohort: Reading and Writing Expository Texts—Writing to Persuade' - weston


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
secondary cohort reading and writing expository texts writing to persuade

Secondary Cohort: Reading and Writing Expository Texts—Writing to Persuade

Michelle Fowler-Amato

Lynn Masterson

Heart of Texas Writing Project

December 7 & 8, 2011

agenda
Agenda
  • 8:30 – 9:00 Feature Article & Notebook
  • 9:00 – 10:00 Reading Workshop: Editorial
  • 10:00 – 10:15 Break
  • 10:15 – 11:30 Writing Workshop: Editorial
our purpose
Our purpose…

Today, we will explore the genre of editorial/op-ed (writing to persuade) by experiencing a mini-inquiry into this form of writing.

We will spend time reading examples and developing criteria for the structure of editorials/op-ed pieces for the explicit purpose of learning how to write in this genre.

revisiting feature articles notebooks
Revisiting Feature Articles & Notebooks
  • Questions
  • Comments
  • Celebrations
writing to persuade
Writing to Persuade

Persuading readers to believe as I do—

“A form that is dedicated to civic discourse, to shaping opinions, changing minds, and effecting change” (Lattimer, 2003, p. 116).

“…grab the reader by the lapel and say, ‘Listen to this; look at the evidence; you can’t deny I’m right!’ In texts that are explicitly argumentative, the voice is more urgently assertive and the structure is tightly controlled by the shape of the argument” (Bomer, 1995, p. 177).

slide6
So…

What have you read that is like what you are trying to write?

Possible Structures:

  • Clear positioning—stating a strong opinion—the writer works hard to convince the reader of the validity of the argument
  • Journey of thought ending with the important idea—less convincing; however, it is more thought provoking.

(Ray, 2006)

thinking through the genre
Thinking Through the Genre

Referring to pages 115 – 119 in Lattimer’s (2003) chapter, Editorial, share the sentence you underlined that represents an important idea in the text and your response to this idea with your table.

reading workshop
Reading Workshop
  • Developing Comprehension
    • Asking the Essential Questions
    • Decoding Editorial Structure
  • Questioning the Text
  • Determining Your Position
when reading an editorial
When reading an editorial,
  • think about what you expect before you start reading.
  • take your time. Don’t rush.
  • reread to make sure nothing is missed.
  • use the essential questions to help figure out what to look for.
  • think things through in your own words.
  • add answers to the essential questions as you read.
  • underline important things in the text.
  • make notes in the margins.
  • use the essential questions to summarize what you find at the end.
  • wait until you are finished and understand the editorial before thinking about your own opinion.
asking essential questions
Asking Essential Questions
  • Each table has an editorial or op-ed piece in the center.
  • Please read, then have a conversation at your table that addresses the following questions:
      • What is the issue?
      • What is the author’s purpose?
      • What are the arguments that support this position?
      • How does this editorial change how I think about the issue?
  • Whole Group Share
decoding the editorial structure
Decoding the Editorial Structure
  • Students need to recognize…
    • position statements
    • explanations of an issue
    • supporting arguments
    • persuasive techniques such as rhetorical questions
    • language that authors use to signal when they are making an argument, denouncing a counterargument, or revealing their position
    • Using the same article, underline and label these criteria
    • Share your findings at your table
    • Share whole group
annotating the editorial
Annotating the Editorial
  • Questioning the Author:
    • Where did you get this information? Is it reliable?
    • How do you know that? Would all people agree?
    • What are other ways this problem could be addressed?
    • What will be the consequences if this does/does not happen? Who will benefit? Who will face problems?
    • What does this word mean?
    • This argument is confusing. What are you really saying?
    • What about this other information [not included]? How does this fit with the argument?
determining your opinion
Determining Your Opinion
  • Students reflect on their reading, questioning to determine for themselves their opinion.
    • What is your opinion of the editorial? What do you agree with? Disagree with? What is the editorial’s strength? Greatest weakness?
    • Where do you stand on the issue? What questions do you still have? What additional information do you need to help you determine your own position?
    • How do your questions help you to determine your opinion of the editorial and your position on the issue?
so at your tables answer the following questions
So…at your tables answer the following questions
  • What are the defining characteristics of an editorial?
  • What must an editorial or any piece with the purpose of persuading have?
  • What may an editorial or any piece with the purpose of persuading have?
  • What is the purpose of a persuasive text?
  • For whom is a persuasive text written?
  • Why is audience so important?
writing workshop
Writing Workshop:
  • Defining a persuasive text
  • Understanding how to craft argumentative text (editorials, commentary, op-ed)
  • Persuading your audience
slide16

“Passion is at the heart of inquiry. Interest and curiosity breed engagement. We must honor kids’ passion and celebrate their individuality. Exploring passions, interests and questions brings the world into focus and opens the door for the broadest interpretation of ideas.”

-Stephanie Harvey

graffiti wall generating ideas
Graffiti Wall: Generating Ideas

Each poster on the wall lists one place in which you get ideas for argument notebook entries. Take 10 minutes to review the options listed. On each poster, list potential topics that come to mind.

  • Take some time to read the ideas of your peers.
  • Do any of these ideas speak to you?
questions that can spark an editorial
Questions that Can Spark an Editorial…
  • have more than one reasonable answer
  • often begin with should
  • focus on smaller issues within the larger topic
choosing a topic turn and talk
Choosing a Topic: Turn and Talk
  • What issues do you feel most passionately about?
  • What issues are most familiar or accessible?
  • Now choose one of these issues to explore through the writing of a persuasive text.
  • 3 minute quick-write
audience
Audience

“Writers need to be pretty explicitly aware of what they intend to do to an audience with this piece of writing—their purpose for publishing. They need to decide what they want their audience to understand, know, believe, and feel, how they want to affect or change the people who will read this particular piece of writing.”

-Randy Bomer

modeling a mini lesson
Modeling a Mini-lesson
  • Connection
  • Teach
  • Activity
  • Link
  • Follow-Up
mini lesson activity
Mini-lesson: Activity
  • Describe your audience.
  • What do you want your audience to know, understand, believe, or feel?
  • What do they currently know, understand, believe and feel?
  • How will you affect or change your audience?
modeling a mini lesson1
Modeling a Mini-lesson
  • Connection— “Recently, I have asked you…”
  • Teach— “…making decisions about your audience and your purpose…”
  • Activity
  • Link— “So when you are working…”
  • Follow-Up— “During workshop…”
collecting around a topic the research cycle mckenzie 1995
Collecting Around a Topic: The Research Cycle (McKenzie, 1995)
  • Questioning
  • Planning
  • Gathering
  • Sorting and Sifting
  • Synthesizing
  • Evaluating
  • Reporting
gathering evidence
Gathering Evidence
  • Consider other positions on the issue. What might their argument be?
  • Review your arguments and evidence.
  • Choose the best arguments and evidence, considering your purpose and audience.
possible editorial structures
Possible Editorial Structures
  • Introduction
  • Background Information
  • Position
  • Arguments (The number used may vary.)
  • Counter-argument
  • Conclusion

Thinking back to Katie Wood Ray…

    • Clear positioning—stating a strong opinion—the writer works hard to convince the reader of the validity of the argument
    • Journey of thought ending with the important idea—less convincing; however, it is more thought provoking.
writing mini lessons
Writing Mini-lessons
  • Take some time to work with a partner to plan for a mini-lesson that might be used during the course of this unit.
  • It may help to make use of the following structure for your mini-lesson:
      • Connection
      • Teach
      • Activity
      • Link
      • Follow-Up
final reflection
Final Reflection

Let’s look back at your initial reflection in thinking through this genre. What are you thinking now?

  • What will your students need to do in order to read and write in this genre?
  • What will your classroom look like when students are engaged in this inquiry?
  • What are your initial thoughts about how you might approach this study within your own classroom?
next time
Next Time
  • Live a writer’s life: Collect in your notebook.
  • Read Chapter (Empirical Inquiry into Qualities of Good Writing) in Building Adolescent Literacy in Today’s English Classrooms.
  • Read Katie Wood Ray’s “Practical How-to Writing,” “Informative How-to Writing,” and “Advice Writing,” as well as Huntley-Johnston et al.’s “How to do How-to Books: Real Life Writing in the Classroom”
  • Bring in examples of that might serve as mentor texts for your students.
  • Bring in student examples of feature articles and editorials for our celebration of student writing.