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A Short Guide to Action Research 4 th Edition. Andrew P. Johnson, Ph.D. Minnesota State University, Mankato www.OPDT-Johnson.com. Chapter 10: Reporting Findings in Action Research. REPORTING QUALITATIVE DATA 1. Create a picture 2. Transform data into a digestible whole

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a short guide to action research 4 th edition

A Short Guide to Action Research4th Edition

Andrew P. Johnson, Ph.D.

Minnesota State University, Mankato

www.OPDT-Johnson.com

slide3

REPORTING QUALITATIVE DATA

1. Create a picture

2. Transform data into a digestible whole

3. Describe meaningful trends, patterns, and categories

slide4

Tips For Presenting Qualitative Data

1. Try to be an impartial reporter

2. Include yourself when it is warranted

3. Take readers along with you in all phases of your study

4. Write clearly and precisely

5. Organize your paper

slide5

THE IMPORTANCE OF STRUCTURE

1. Structure and Inductive Analysis

a. Gather data and collect notes.

b. Spread out your notes in front of you.

c. Look for common ideas.

d. Move common ideas into groups to create sections.

e. Within each section, look for similar items to create paragraphs or subsections

2. Use headings and subheadings

slide6

1. Make your data come alive:

a. samples of students’ products

b. quotes

c. excerpts from your research journal

2. Put information that interrupts the flow of the text in an appendix

slide7

REPORTING QUANTITATIVE DATA

Use numerals to express the following:

1. Numbers 10 and above

•The class generated 27 different ideas in the space of 5 minutes.

2. Dates

• This study took place on May 5, 2009.

3. Ages

• She is 7 years old.

4. Time

• The subjects reported to the laboratory at 1:00 p.m. They stayed there for 2 hours and 7 minutes.

slide8

5. People in a study

• There were 15 students in this study: 8 males and 7 females.

6. Grade level

• Most children begin grade 2 with a thorough knowledge of consonant sounds. (Note: It is grade 2 but second grade.)

7. Chapters

• Most would agree that Chapter 17 is the most fascinating chapter of the book.

8. Pages

• Page 1 of this text begins with a fascinating review of the writing process.

slide9

9. Scales or rating systems

• He scored a 7 on a 10-point scale.

10. Money

• The subjects in this study were paid $8 for participating.

11. Numbers grouped for comparison with other numbers 10 and above

• The study showed that 9 of 15 students were able to improve their grade averages significantly by learning how to read critically. Of the 15 students participating, 6 received a grade of A, 5 received a grade of B, and 4 received a grade of C.

slide10

Reporting Arithmetic Data

1. Arithmetic data are reported in descending order (from greatest to least).

2. Tell what you are observing first

3. Tell the total number before you report categories

4. Stay consistent with the order of gender or other categories

slide11

TABLES AND FIGURES

1. Tables = quick, visual way to organize and report information

2. Tables meant to replace written data, not repeat

3. Table make data easier to digest

4. Figures – lists, graphs, diagrams, or pictures