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FOOD SAFETY SO WHO’S IN CONTROL? PowerPoint Presentation
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FOOD SAFETY SO WHO’S IN CONTROL?

FOOD SAFETY SO WHO’S IN CONTROL?

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FOOD SAFETY SO WHO’S IN CONTROL?

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  1. FOOD SAFETYSO WHO’S IN CONTROL? Lynn Wilcott Food Safety Specialist British Columbia Centre for Disease Control Getting the Word Out: Are We Communicating Effectively? Food Safety Communicators Conference Food Safety Network University of Guelph

  2. Overview • What causes foodborne illness • Cost of foodborne illness in BC • Traditional food protection programs • Significant contributing factors to foodborne illness • So who’s in control • The Risk Based Inspection approach • FOODSAFE

  3. What Causes Foodborne Illness • Causative agents Reference: Todd, E, 1994, Foodborne and Waterborne Disease in Canada, 1987.

  4. What Causes Foodborne Illness (cont’d) • Locations of “contamination events” for outbreaks • Majority of “contamination events” occur in food service establishments and private homes

  5. Contamination Event • The last place in food’s voyage where a food safety hazard could be: • prevented, • eliminated, or • reduced to acceptable levels. • Primarily food service and homes • Bacterial food borne illness outbreaks: • Majority-when received: food “already” contaminated • Majority-contamination could be eliminated or reduced

  6. Cost of Foodborne Illness in BC • Estimated annual number of cases in BC: 208,000 to 652,000 • Annual cost of foodborne illness in BC: $206M to $644M • Comparisons: • Cost of physical inactivity: $422M annually • Cost of obesity: $730 – 830M annually

  7. Traditional Food Protection Programs • Importance of structure is engrained in “food inspection” history • “Engineer out” problems • Approach has made (and continues to) significant reductions in foodborne illness • This approach can only do so much.

  8. Significant Contributing Factors to Foodborne Illness: Food Service

  9. So Who’s in Control • Government? • “Handlers" of food? • Food Producers • Food Processors • Food Service Workers • Consumers

  10. So Who’s in Control (cont’d) • Government • Legislation/standards • Inspection/enforcement • 4 hours of inspection per year (2 inspections with 2 hours each) • Premises operates 10 hours a day for 360 days per year • Inspector sees establishment for 0.109% of its operating hours • Education • Influence attitudes/behaviors

  11. So Who’s in Control (cont’d) • Food handlers: • personal discretion with food safety procedures • critical to ensuring food safety • knowledge is key • people tend to do the “right thing” if given right tools • ultimately responsible for safety of food

  12. Food Safety “Education” in BC • Two initiatives for food service industry: • Risk Based Inspection Approach • FOODSAFE training course

  13. Risk Based Inspection Approach • Risk based inspection: Food service establishments • Facility hygiene/structure still important • More emphasis on procedures • Goal: primary discussion with operators involves safe food handling procedures (“educating” the operator!!!) • Food Safety Plans • 2000: Enactment of Food Premises Regulation • Requirement for FSE’s to implement food safety plans (HACCP based) • Goal: operators to gain control (learn about!!!) of their food safety procedures • Food Safety Plan audit • By both operator and EHO • Is food safety plan current • Does plan address food safety procedures

  14. FOODSAFE • Government and industry “made in BC” initiative • Train individuals to be more responsible food handlers by using safe food handling methods • 500,000 trained in BC – completely self funded • Used in several other provinces and countries • Goal: prevention of food borne illness • Has it worked?

  15. Summary • Who’s in control of food safety • Government • Ensure structures/equipment hygienic • Standards • Inspection service • Facilitate/provide information to food handlers on safe food handling procedures • Risk based inspection approach • FOODSAFE • Food handlers • Knowledgeable in safe food handling procedures

  16. Conclusion • Target education • Industries, groups, individuals that affect food safety • Limit messages: higher risk procedures/items/etc. • KISS principle. • Next Step: • EatSmartBC education program for consumers