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Warm-up –Answer these Essential Questions. Explain the style of the Modernist time period in literature. Name the genres of the Modernists. What was happening in the U.S. during this period? What was the purpose of the Modernists? Name some works from this period.

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warm up answer these essential questions
Warm-up –Answer these Essential Questions
  • Explain the style of the Modernist time period in literature.
  • Name the genres of the Modernists.
  • What was happening in the U.S. during this period?
  • What was the purpose of the Modernists?
  • Name some works from this period.
  • Name some authors from this period.
  • What was the Harlem Renaissance?
american literature

AMERICAN LITERATURE

Modernism

1914-1946

georgia performance standard
Georgia Performance Standard
  • ELAALRL3: The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to their contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods.

b. The student relates a literary work to the characteristics of the literary time period or historical setting:

    • iv. Modernism (including Harlem Renaissance)
genre style of the modernism period
Genre & Style of the Modernism Period

Style

Genres

interior monologue:

a speech by one person in the middle of the play, story, or poem

stream of consciousness:

a literary technique that presents the thoughts & feelings of a character as they occur.

highly experimental as writers tried to find a unique style

novels

plays

use of interior monologue & stream of consciousness

poetry

historical context of modernism
Historical Context of Modernism
  • Writers reflected the ideas of Darwin (survival of the fittest) and Karl Marx (how money and class structure control a nation).
  • WW I (destroyed sense of optimism from past)
  • Roaring 20’s
  • Great Depression
  • WWII
  • overwhelming technological changes of the 20th century
  • rise of the youth culture
  • Harlem Renaissance
modernism
Modernism
  • Modernists experimented with a wide variety of new approaches and techniques, producing a remarkably diverse body of literature.
modernism continued
Modernism continued…
  • Modernists omitted expositions, transitions, resolutions, and explanations that were used in traditional literature=

NON-TRADITIONAL WRITING AND FORMS

modernism continued1
Modernism continued…
  • In poetry, they abandoned traditional forms and meters in favor of free verse. They made up rhythms to suit individual poems.
  • The themes of their works were usually implied, rather than directly stated, creating a sense of uncertainty and forcing readers to draw their own conclusions.
expatriates artists born in america but moved to other countries
Expatriates (artists born in America but moved to other countries)
  • Some writers were disillusioned ( by WWI and went to Europe to live: Gertrude Stein, Sherwood Anderson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, and T.S. Eliot
stream of consciousness
Stream of Consciousness
  • Writers began using this technique to re-create the natural flow of a character’s thoughts.

DONE FIRST BY BIERCE IN “AN OCCURRENCE @ OWL CREEK BRIDGE” BUT COPIED BY MANY MODERN WRITERS

poets
Poets
  • E.E. Cummings used new techniques in his poetry: wordplay, unique typography, and special punctuation.
  • William Carlos Williams used informal, conversational speech in his poetry; also known for minimalist and imagist poems
nobel prize for literature
Nobel Prize for Literature
  • The first American to win this prize in 1930 was Sinclair Lewis. He wrote Main Street, Babbitt, and Arrowsmith.
  • The playwright Eugene O’Neill, won the prize in 1936 for his plays.
  • In 1938, Pearl S. Buck won. She wrote about China where she had lived as a child. The Good Earth is considered her best work.
  • Other winners: T.S. Eliot (1948), William Faulkner (1949), Ernest Hemingway, and John Steinbeck (Of Mice and Men and The Grapes of Wrath)
slide13
F. Scott FitzgeraldThe Great Gatsby andThis Side of Paradise(both stories depict life in the roaring 1920’s)

F. Scott Fitzgerald 1896 - 1940

slide14

William Carlos Williams (also a physician) used informal, conversational speech in his poetry.

  • His epic poem is “Paterson” named for a New Jersey city. It is on the next 3 slides.
slide15

Paterson lies in the valley under the Passaic Fallsits spent waters forming the outline of his back. Helies on his right side, head near the thunderof the waters filling his dreams! Eternally asleep,his dreams walk about the city where he persistsincognito. Butterflies settle on his stone ear.Immortal he neither moves nor rouses and is seldomseen, though he breathes and the subtleties of his machinationsdrawing their substance from the noise of the pouring riveranimate a thousand automations. Who because theyneither know their sources nor the sills of theirdisappointments walk outside their bodies aimlessly      for the most part,locked and forgot in their desires-unroused. 

slide16

—Say it, no ideas but in things—  nothing but the blank faces of the houses  and cylindrical trees  bent, forked by preconception and accident—  split, furrowed, creased, mottled, stained—  secret—into the body of the light!From above, higher than the spires, highereven than the office towers, from oozy fieldsabandoned to gray beds of dead grass,black sumac, withered weed-stalks,mud and thickets cluttered with dead leaves-the river comes pouring in above the cityand crashes from the edge of the gorgein a recoil of spray and rainbow mists- 

slide17

(What common language to unravel?  . . .combed into straight lines  from that rafter of a rock's  lip.)A man like a city and a woman like a flower—who are in love. Two women. Three women.Innumerable women, each like a flower.                        Butonly one man—like a city.

ernest hemingway 1899 1961
Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961)
  • Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (1953)
  • Nobel Prize in Literature (1954)
  • He wrote The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms, among others.
  • Much of his best writing focuses on WWI and its aftermath.
john steinbeck 1902 1968
John Steinbeck (1902-1968)
  • Won Nobel prize for Literature
  • Two works are: Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men
sinclair lewis 1885 1951
Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951)
  • In 1930, he was the first American to win the Nobel prize for literature.
  • Three of his works are Main Street, Babbitt, and Arrowsmith.
t s eliot 1888 1965
T. S. Eliot (1888-1965)
  • In 1938, he won the Nobel prize for literature.
  • He was an expatriate and went to Europe in 1914. He lived in England until he died.
  • His poem, ”The Waste Land” is considered by some to be the most important poem of the century.
first few lines of the waste land
First few lines of “The Waste Land”

APRIL is the cruellest month, breeding  

Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing  

Memory and desire, stirring  

Dull roots with spring rain.  

Winter kept us warm, covering

Earth in forgetful snow, feeding  

A little life with dried tubers.

the harlem renaissance
The Harlem Renaissance
  • This movement started around 1921 and continued into the 1930’s.
  • It was a rebirth of art, music and literature from Harlem, New York.
  • The video on the next slide will explain the Harlem Renaissance.
georgia performance standard1
Georgia Performance Standard
  • ELAALRL3: The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to their contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods.

b. The student relates a literary work to the characteristics of the literary time period or historical setting:

    • iv. Modernism (including Harlem Renaissance)
answer these essential questions
Answer these Essential Questions
  • Explain the style of the Modernist time period in literature.
  • Name the genres of the Modernists.
  • What was happening in the U.S. during this period?
  • What was the purpose of the Modernists?
  • Name some works from this period.
  • Name some authors from this period.
  • What was the Harlem Renaissance?
slide27

Explain the style of the Modernist time period in literature.

  • highly experimental as writers tried to find a unique style
  • use of interior monologue & stream of consciousness
slide29

3. What was happening in the U.S. during the Modernists time period of literature?

  • WW I
  • Roaring 20’s
  • Great Depression
  • WWII
  • technological changes of the 20th century
  • rise of the youth culture
  • Harlem Renaissance
slide30

4. What was the purpose of the Modernists?

to capture the essence of modern life in both the form and content of their work

slide31

5. Name some works from this period.

The Grapes of Wrath, The Great Gatsby, The Sound and the Fury, The Good Earth, Of Mice and Men, etc…

slide32

6. Name some authors from this period.

Possible answers: Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, T.S. Eliot, E.E. Cummings, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, William Carlos Williams,

slide33

7. What was the Harlem Renaissance?

A rebirth of art, music, and literature that happened in Harlem, New York