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How Do You Set Goals for Students ?. EDUC 602. Student. Setting Goals. Students receiving intervention services should be working toward achieving goals in their area of need.

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setting goals
Setting Goals
  • Students receiving intervention services should be working toward achieving goals in their area of need.
  • Teacher should frequently review the student’s progress toward the goal to ensure that the appropriate intervention is being used.
  • Student goals should be written to meet the following criteria:
    • Be Specific: What exactly do you want the student to be able to do?
    • Be Measurable : How will you monitor the student’s progress?
    • Have a Specific Timeline: When should the student have accomplished this goal?
    • Be Realistic: Is your goal achievable, based on the baseline assessment data you have collected? Do you have the resources and time to accomplish the goal?

Benedictine University

why is monitoring progress important

Why is Monitoring Progress Important?

Unless otherwise stated the content of this section is based on RtI Progress Moitoring Case Study by Kim Skow and Janice Brown for the IRIS CENTER http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/case_studies/ICS-011.pdf

EDUC 602

progress monitoring
Progress Monitoring
  • Students of teachers who use progress monitoring achieve higher grades than do those whose teachers do not (Fuchs, Butterworth, & Fuchs, 1989)
  • Students are more aware of their performance and view themselves as more responsible for their learning when they graph their progress monitoring data(Davis, Fuchs, Fuchs, & Whinnery, 1995)
  • Students learn more when teachers implement progress monitoring (Safer & Fleischman, 2005)
  • By monitoring students’ progress, teachers can make instructional changes to improve the academic growth of all students, including those who are struggling with reading (Fuchs & Fuchs, 2007)
  • Progress monitoring data are strongly predictive of student achievement on state and local standardized achievement tests (Good, Simmons, & Kame’enui, 2001)

Benedictine University

what assessments can be used to monitor student progress

What Assessments Can be Used to Monitor Student Progress?

Unless stated otherwise the content of this section is based on Chapter 4 – Gunning, T.G. (2010) Assessing and correcting reading and writing difficulties . Boston, MA.: Pearson, Education, Inc.

EDUC 602

curriculum based measures
Curriculum Based Measures
  • Curriculum Based Measures (CBMs)
    • Assess overall indicators of proficiency, NOT mastery of specific skills
    • Quick probes
    • Can be used frequently
    • Can be compared
    • Are often standardized

Benedictine University

how do you set benchmarks and record data when progress monitoring students

How Do you Set BenchmarksandRecordData When Progress Monitoring Students?

Unless stated otherwise the content of this section is based on Chapter 4 – Gunning, T.G. (2010) Assessing and correcting reading and writing difficulties . Boston, MA.: Pearson, Education, Inc.

EDUC 602

recording data
Recording Data
  • Graphing data is an integral part of progress monitoring
  • Graphing data
    • Allows teachers to monitor student progress
    • Allows teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of the instructional program
    • Helps teachers compare student data to set benchmarks
    • Gives teachers a visual aid to assist in communicating with parents and other teachers

Adapted from: RtI Progress Moitoring Case Study by Kim Skow and Janice Brown for the IRIS CENTER http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/case_studies/ICS-011.pdf

Benedictine University

graphing data
Graphing Data
  • Every time a progress monitoring probe is administered, it should be graphed
    • The y-axis represents the range of possible scores
    • The x-axis represents the number of weeks of instruction
    • A line should be drawn to connect each data point

YAxis

X Axis

Adapted from: RtI Progress Moitoring Case Study by Kim Skow and Janice Brown for the IRIS CENTER http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/case_studies/ICS-011.pdf

Benedictine University

setting benchmarks
Setting Benchmarks
  • Many progress-monitoring measures have expected levels of performance (benchmarks)
  • Use of published benchmarks should be used with caution and be complemented by professional judgment
  • Assessing and Correcting Reading and Writing Difficulties(pages 118 -119) provides examples of oral and silent reading rates, as well as completion rates for Maze passages (pp. 116-117) and estimated growth rates

Benedictine University

goal lines and benchmarks
Goal Lines and Benchmarks
  • After you have determined an appropriate benchmark for your student, the following steps should be completed to draw the goal line:
    • Indicate the end-of-year goal or the short-term goal on the student’s graph with an X
    • Determine the median (middle) of the first three scores on the student’s probes. For example, if the first three scores on a fluency CBM are 40 wpm, 42 wpm, and 43 wpm, the median score is 42 wpm
    • Draw the goal line between the median of the first three scores and the goal you marked with an X on the graph

Adapted from: RtI Progress Moitoring Case Study by Kim Skow and Janice Brown for the IRIS CENTER http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/case_studies/ICS-011.pdf

Benedictine University