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Literary Device Anachronism. Elizabeth Figueroa Lourdes Oseguera Period: 2. Definition. Anachronism - an error in chronology, or placing an event, person, item, or language expression in the wrong period.

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literary device anachronism

Literary DeviceAnachronism

Elizabeth Figueroa

Lourdes Oseguera

Period: 2

definition
Definition
  • Anachronism - an error in chronology, or placing an event, person, item, or language expression in the wrong period.
  • The term is originally from the Greek anakhronismos formed by combining ana, which means “back or backwards,” and khronos, which means “time.”
pronunciation guide
Pronunciation Guide
  • [uh-nak-ruh-niz-uh m]
  • http://www.merriam-webster.com/audio.php?file=anachr01.wav&word=anachronism&text=\uh-NAK-ruh-niz-um\

Anachronism

literary example 1
Literary example #1

In Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar,

an anachronism is used:

  • Brutus: Peace! count the clock.Cassius: The clock has stricken three.Act II, scene i : lines 193 – 194
analysis 1
Analysis #1
  • An anachronism is something which is out of its time like the clock mentioned in the play.
  • This is an example of Anachronism because there were no clocks during Roman times, and the striking clock was not invented until 1,400 years after Caesar’s death.
  • Stops the argument between Cassius and Brutus. If it weren't for the ‘clock striking’ the argument wouldn’t have stop. Their secret meeting had to part or they would have become suspicious.
literary example 2
Literary example #2
  • Casca. . . . And then he offered it the third time. He put it the third time by; and still as he refused it, the rabblement hooted, and clapped their chapped hands, and threw up their sweaty nightcaps, and uttered such a deal of stinking breath because Caesar refused the crown that it had, almost, choked Caesar; for he swooned and fell down at it. And for mine own part, I durst not laugh, for fear of opening my lips and receiving the bad air. Cassius. But soft, I pray you. What, did Caesar swound?
  • Julius Caesar (Act I; 2; 249-257)[3]
analysis 2
Analysis #2
  • Nightcaps were not invented at the

time.

  • Throwing the nightcaps in the air meant as a sign of respect, and admiration for Caesar. When Caesar refused the crown, it showed that he was humble.
  • Also caps are shown to be thrown in graduation as sign of accomplishments.
literary example 3
Literary Example #3
  • Horses are mentioned fourteen times in the Book of Mormon, and are portrayed as an important part of the cultures described.
  • [6] There is no evidence that horses existed on the American continent during the 2500-3000 year history of the Book of Mormon (2500 B.C. - 400 A.D.)
  • Horses did not reappear in the Americas until the Spaniards brought them from Europe
analysis 3
Analysis #3
  • In the Book of Mormon there is a historical error that there were no evidence of horses during the time the 2500-3000, in the history of the Book of Mormon.
  • The significance of this is that a lot of the products and people would not have been able to be transported from one place to another.
  • A mistake can throw everything off its course especially a Holy Book. Facts are unreliable.
  • Horses were also a sign of power, couldn't have been shown without them.