Developing planning capacities in fragile contexts the afghanistan experience
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Developing planning capacities in fragile contexts – the Afghanistan experience. IIEP Summer School 20-31 July 2009 Rebuilding resilience: planning education in « fragile contexts ». Strategic planning The strategic planning cycle.

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Developing planning capacities in fragile contexts the afghanistan experience l.jpg

Developing planning capacities in fragile contexts – the Afghanistan experience

IIEP Summer School 20-31 July 2009

Rebuilding resilience: planning education in « fragile contexts »


Strategic planning the strategic planning cycle l.jpg
Strategic planning Afghanistan experienceThe strategic planning cycle


Strategic sector planning basic logical steps of the plan preparation l.jpg
Strategic sector planning Afghanistan experienceBasic logical steps of the plan preparation

1. Situation analysis

2. Vision, goal and target setting

3. Assessment of proposed targets’ feasibility

4. Formulation of priority action programs

5. Preparation of financial framework

6. Preparation of monitoring framework

7. Consolidation of draft sector plan

8. Final revision and adoption of the plan

9. Preparation of yearly operational plans

Involvement

of

national

and

international

stakeholders


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Session Afghanistan experienceoutline

  • Reflection in groups

  • Development of National Education Strategic Plans

  • Capacity development for strategic planning

  • Principles of intervention

  • How strategic planning strengthens the education system

  • Capacity development model

  • Key messages


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Reflection in groups Afghanistan experience

  • Each group picks one question

  • You have 20 minutes

  • Discuss and write your key points on the flipchart

  • Appoint a reporter

  • Make a short presentation


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Questions Afghanistan experience

  • Group 1: What are the obstacles or challenges to planning in situations of fragility?

  • Group 2: What are the benefits of educational planning in situations of fragility?

  • Group 3: What are the benefits of educational planning in situations of fragility?

  • Group 4: Who should be involved in the planning process? At which level of the system? (Be specific)

  • Group 5: What are the main differences between planning education development in fragile situations and planning in normal circumstances?


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Population: Afghanistan experience

33,6 million (July 2009)

Growth rate: 2.63%

Life expectancy: 44.6 y

Ethnic groups:

Pashtun 42%, Tajik 27%, Hazara 9%, Uzbek 9%, Aimak 4%, Turkmen 3%, Baloch 2%, other 4%

Languages:

Dari (official) 50%, Pashto (official) 35%, Uzbek and Turkmen 11%, 30 minor languages

Islamic Republic

34 provinces

Strong international presence (ISAF and humanitarian/

development partners)


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Education Afghanistan experienceoverview

  • 6.3 million in schools in 2008 (34% girls) (only 900,000 total in 2001)

  • 50% primary school age children out of school

  • 24% literacy (32% male, 13% female)

  • 12,000 primary and secondary schools

  • 160,000 teachers (24% qualified)

  • Equity issues: girls and women; urban/rural; province/province disparities


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Development of National Education Strategic Plans Afghanistan experience

  • MoE-IIEP cooperation started in May 2002

  • MoHE Strategic Plan, 2004

  • Strategic Planning and Capacity Development Project, 2006-2009

  • First National Education Strategic Plan (NESP) 2006-2010 started 2006

  • NESP II 2010-2014 started 2008


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Development of National Education Strategic Plans (2) Afghanistan experience

At the start of NESP I:

  • Not enough qualified personnel

  • Weak management

  • Absence of (reliable) data – EMIS

  • Worsening security situation

  • But, strong political leadership for plan development


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Development of National Education Strategic Plans (3) Afghanistan experience

At the start of NESP II, many challenges remained, but:

  • Consultation efforts

  • Joint reviewprocess / donorharmonization

  • Increasingtechnicalcapacity / autonomy

  • EMIS in place at national level / School Survey

  • Schoolmappingunderway

  • Teacher registration underway

  • New MoE structure


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Capacity development for strategic planning Afghanistan experience

  • Variety of capacity development approaches

    • Formal training workshops in country

    • In-depth training (Masters at IIEP)

    • Technical assistance as a training modality (no substitution)

    • Generic skills training (English, computer)

    • Recruitment of national TAs (conditional to MoE recruitment)

    • Attempt to train trainers

    • Coaching/mentoring in country and at a distance

  • Collaboration withotheragencies / TAs


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Principles of intervention Afghanistan experience

  • Participatory approach (involvement of actors within and outside MoE)

  • Gender sensitive approach – positive discrimination

  • Hands-on work works best

  • Support donor harmonization (joint review of NESP implementation)

  • Plea for long-term support to capacity development (predictability)

  • Plea for institutionalcooperation (sustainable)

  • Support future SWAp perspective


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How strategic planning strengthens the education system Afghanistan experience

  • Contributes to State building

  • Puts the Ministry of Education in the leading position

  • Improves internal/external communication

  • Creates better synergy among the different Ministry departments and autonomous bodies

  • Facilitates coordination with and between donors (alignment)

  • Increases the efficiency of service delivery by the Ministry


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How strategic planning strengthens the education system (2) Afghanistan experience

  • Creates national ownership of and mobilization for education

  • Urges MoE to restructure

  • Urges MoE to manage better (ex: merit-based recruitment, decentralization, school councils etc.)

  • Is a catalyst for systems development (EMIS, AFMIS, program budgeting, teacher registration, school mapping etc.)

  • Is a trigger for capacity development

  • Increases technical self-confidence


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Challenges & Afghanistan experienceweaknesses

  • Security

  • Quality

  • Implementation (operational planning)

  • Reaching provincial/district level

  • Linking plan to budget

  • Top-down vs. bottom-up planning

  • Develop capacities while delivering services

  • Staff turnover, « brain drain » or death

  • Aid coordination


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Capacity development model Afghanistan experience

  • In-country training

  • In-depth training for selected staff

  • Sector plan preparation focused on process (more than product)

  • Plan implementation / revision

  • Decentralized (provincial) level

  • Building national training capacity + institutional arrangements

  • Phase out? Remain involved? How?


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Key messages Afghanistan experience

  • Political will and leadership

  • Foster participation

  • Long-term involvement (financial and institutional)

  • Flexibility of aid

  • Trust-building

  • Self-confidence restoration

  • Agree with MoE on how far to be involved in policies and substance


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Key messages Afghanistan experience

  • Avoid substitution (despite temptation)

  • Do not distort with high salaries

  • Ally with like-minded partners

  • Be prepared to invest to start all over again

  • Be prepared to take risks