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Your Online Reputation Curriculum Module Overview for BSU FasTrack Graduate Project Spring 2011 PowerPoint Presentation
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Your Online Reputation Curriculum Module Overview for BSU FasTrack Graduate Project Spring 2011

Your Online Reputation Curriculum Module Overview for BSU FasTrack Graduate Project Spring 2011

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Your Online Reputation Curriculum Module Overview for BSU FasTrack Graduate Project Spring 2011

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  1. Your Online Reputation Curriculum Module Overview for BSU FasTrack Graduate Project Spring 2011

  2. Introduction • We live “our lives in a world where the Internet records everything and forgets nothing — where every online photo, status update, Twitter post and blog entry by and about us can be stored forever” (Rosen, 2010). • Teens must learn to protect and manage their online reputations now, as these will become permanent records of their past for all to see.

  3. Research Findings • Teens are the heaviest users of technology out of all age groups • 93% are online • 73% use social networking sites like Facebook • 54% text with their friends daily • 44% manage their online reputations • (Rosen, 2010)

  4. Reputation Statistics When applying for a job or admittance to college, chances are your online reputation will be evaluated. • Employers • 75% conduct online research of applicants • 70% have rejected a candidate based on what they found • (Rosen, 2010). • Colleges • 25% (and growing) conduct online research of applicants • 38% have rejected a candidate based on what they found • (Online, 2010).

  5. Reputation Management Follow some basic steps to preserve your online reputation • Do NOT: • Share your "friends" list. A friend of a friend of a friend of a friend may not be so friendly. • Post pictures or comments that could be damaging to you. "I hate school" or "He's an idiot" or "I'm so bored at work" have already cost people their job or education. • Lie. • Tag pictures you wouldn't want EVERYONE to see including parents, employers, teachers, and friends. • Frequent the site(s) while you are supposed to be doing something else, like working. Date/time stamps have burned many people. • Use an alias, assuming that you'll remain anonymous - You're not. • Send or text a compromising photo or video to a friend. The picture may outlast your friendship.

  6. Reputation Management Follow some basic steps to preserve your online reputation (cont.) • Do: • Remember that once something is posted, it may already be out of your control. • Remove damaging content from your own sites. • Contact the sources of damaging information and ask for it to be removed. • Error on the side of too much privacy - lock down your profile. Remember that Face Recognition technology already exists and could soon become part of Facebook, iPhone apps, and search engines! Any picture, anywhere may be found - tagged or not. • Read and understand the sites' privacy settings. • Be selective about the groups you join. Remember, "you can learn a lot about people by the friends they keep." • Post things online that will enhance your reputation. Note: Having no online information raises suspicions of "what is this person hiding". • Create a Google profile. You control the content and it appears first in Google searches. • Conduct searches on yourself regularly to monitor what may be out there.

  7. Lesson Plan • The Lesson consists of 6 components • Introductory video, Your Online Reputation • Online Risk Survey, Is Your Online Reputation at Risk? • Informational Prezi, Digital Tattoos • Group Activity • Individual Summary • Class discussion

  8. References Borich, Dr. Kerry D. “Motivation and Classroom Learning.” University of Texas.edu. Retrieved April 12, 2011 from http://www.edb.utexas.edu/borich/pdfdocs/chapter7.pdf. Cherry, Kendra. “Erikson’s Theory of Psychosocial Development.” About.com Psychology. Retrieved March 22, 2011 from http://psychology.about.com/od/psychosocialtheories/a/psychosocial.htm. Nunley, Dr. Kathie F. “How the Adolescent Brain Challenges the Adult Brain.” Help4Teachers.com. Retrieved April 9, 2011 from http://www.help4teachers.com/prefrontalcortex.htm. O'Hara, Susan & Pritchard, Robert. “What is the Impact of Technology on Learning?” Education.com. 2009. Retrieved February 12, 2011 from http://www.education.com/reference/article/what-impact-technology-learning/ “Online Reputation Management for College Admissions”. (2010, November 1). SafetyWeb.com. Retrieved March 23, 2011 from http://www.safetyweb.com/reputation-for-college-bound-students. Purcell, Kristen. (2011, February 9). “Trends in Teen Communication and Social Media Use.” PewInternet.org. Retrieved March 22, 2011 from http://www.pewinternet.org/Presentations/2011/Feb/PIP-Girl-Scout-Webinar.aspx. Rosen, Jeffrey. (2010, July 21). “The Web Means the End of Forgetting.” NYTimes.com. Retrieved March 10, 2011 from http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/25/magazine/25privacy-t2.html?pagewanted=1&_r=3&ref=magazine. Woolfolk, Anita. (2010). Educational Psychology, Eleventh Edition. Columbus, Ohio: Merrill.