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Feedback, Feedback, Feedback

Feedback, Feedback, Feedback

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Feedback, Feedback, Feedback

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  1. Feedback, Feedback, Feedback Toby Boss ESU 6

  2. Segments that are routine components of every lesson • Rules and procedures (Q 6) • Communicating learning goals (Q1) • Tracking student progress (Q1) • Celebrating success (Q1)

  3. Research about feedback…

  4. Feedback is most powerful when it comes from the student to the teacher. Hattie,J. (2009). Visible learning a synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. New York, NY; Routledge

  5. “Feedback from student to teacher helps make learning visible” (Hattie, 2009). Teachers seek (or at least open to) What do students know and understand? Where are they making errors? When do they have misconceptions? When do they lose interest?

  6. The Meta-Analysis of Feedback

  7. An interesting finding….(Carless, 2006) Asked students and teachers whether teachers provided detailed feedback that helped students improve their next assignments… 70% teachers claimed they provided such detailed feedback often or always 45% of students agreed with their teachers’ claims

  8. Feedback Findings…(Nuthall,2005) Most feedback students obtained in any day in classrooms was from other students, and most of this feedback was incorrect.

  9. Grading & Feedback… • Grade only • Feedback only • Grade and feedback combined… • Unfortunately, the grade “trumps” the comments if used together. Butler, D. L., & Nisan, M. (1986). Effects of no feedback, task-related comments, and grades on intrinsic motivation and performance. Journal of Educational Psychology, 78, 210-216.

  10. Fashion Sense • Provide feedback about the following fashion choice in the form of A, B, C, D or Failing. • Put the score on your response board

  11. Fashion Sense • Provide feedback about the fashion choice by listing the problem attire (check right or wrong). • Put the score on your response board

  12. Fashion Sense • Provide feedback about the fashion choice by explaining what should be changed and why. • Summarize on your response board

  13. Grading & Feedback… • Grade only • Feedback only • Grade and feedback combined… • Unfortunately, the grade “trumps” the comments if used together. Butler, D. L., & Nisan, M. (1986). Effects of no feedback, task-related comments, and grades on intrinsic motivation and performance. Journal of Educational Psychology, 78, 210-216.

  14. What makes for good feedback? • Timing • Amount • To whom? • Specificity • Effort and preparation • Word choices

  15. Some types of feedback are more effective. • Provide cues or reinforcement to the learning or relate the feedback to learning goals. • Video, audio, or computer-assisted instruction • Key is feedback received and acted upon by students—not that teachers gave it, but that students were able to interpret and act upon that which was given. How will you know?

  16. “Common sense is not always common practice.” Dr. Stephen Covey

  17. Timing FeedbackBetter Worse Returning assessment or assignment the next day Giving immediate responses Flash card idea or using clickers Re-teaching misconceptions to factual questions Returning assessment or assignment 2 weeks later Ignoring misconceptions No opportunity for student to rework/reassess to show improvement Brookhart, 2008 ASCD

  18. Amount of FeedbackBetter Worse Select a couple of main points for comments Those connected to learning goals Comment on strengths as well as challenges Returning assignments with every single error (in mechanics) noted Voluminous comments Giving feedback on lower quality papers only Brookhart, 2008 ASCD

  19. Feedback, to whom?Better Worse Individual specific feedback Small group or whole group when all are needed to receive similar reteaching Using same comments for all students Refraining from individual comments due to time constraints. • Brookhart, 2008 ASCD

  20. Feedback SpecificityBetter Worse Using nouns and descriptive adjectives Reviewing criteria Giving ideas about learning strategies Vague comments like, “Study harder!” • Brookhart, 2008 ASCD

  21. Feedback EffectivenessMost Least Provide info on specifics Provide a notation about errors in margin and ask students to find the error. Low threat environment Clear Purposeful Meaningful Compatible with students’ prior knowledge Telling only number correct or incorrect Praise about attributes rather than effort Punishment Extrinsic (tangible) rewards

  22. Examples “You need to include more about the Treaty of Versailles”. (specific to the task) “You need to edit this piece of writing by checking the descriptors you used--this way the reader can better understand your meaning”. (specific to process) Hattie,J. (2009). Visible learning a synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. New York, NY; Routledge

  23. More Examples… “Consider using the throwing strategies we discussed; load it, crack it, whip it; or pull, lift, contact” (process) “You already know the key features of an effective opening, check to see if they are in your first paragraph”. (self-regulation) “You captured the essence of our goals. Good work!” (specific praise) Modified from: Hattie,J. (2009). Visible learning a synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. New York, NY; Routledge

  24. The Art of Feedback… The right form of feedback at, or just above, the level where the student is working. Be cautious of personal praise (that which isn’t specific to task, process, or self-assessment) Good job! Way to go! You are a good student!

  25. Feedback on a Task Well Done (Growth Theory) Reference how a student engages in a task. • You did a nice job on this assignment. It’s clear that you did a lot of work on this. • You tried very hard on this—nice job. • You put a lot of effort into this. • You were well prepared. • You came well informed—very good. Marzano, Pickering & Heflebower, The Highly Engaged Classroom, 2011.

  26. Feedback on Work Not Well Done • First, always comment on any part that was done well. • Give feedback regarding lack of effort or preparation when it is clearly an issue—students make a link between lack of effort and result. • Put it in question form: “How well did you prepare for the test? You usually seem pretty well prepared for most everything you do.” Marzano, Pickering & Heflebower, The Highly Engaged Classroom, 2011.

  27. My feedback reflection • In what mode do I typically give feedback? • Orally, written, pen color, stickers? • For written feedback, what are typical phrases that I use? • How timely is my feedback? • Same day? Same week? Within two weeks? • Do I sometimes, often, or rarely use rubrics to provide students feedback?

  28. Feedback • The message to students should always be that if you try hard and prepare well you can accomplish great things.

  29. Flubaroo • http://whsengage.wikispaces.com