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Double, double toil and trouble Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. PowerPoint Presentation
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Double, double toil and trouble Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. The “Real” Macbeth lived in the 11 th Century. He was a Scottish “Thane” (Lord) who was cousin to King Duncan.

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Presentation Transcript
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The “Real” Macbeth lived in the 11th Century. He was a Scottish “Thane” (Lord) who was cousin to King Duncan.

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King James I loved the theater. Shakespeare wrote Macbeth for him. Shakespeare made James’ ancestor, Banquo, the most courageous character in the play.

the three weird sisters predict macbeth will be king name the allusion wyrd means fate
The three “weird sisters” predict Macbeth will be king. Name the allusion. (“Wyrd” means fate.)
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John Singer Sargent’s portrait of Lady Macbeth contains interesting symbolism. How does the artist characterize Lady Macbeth?

tragedy according to aristotle

The tragic figure is a noble, good person, but not perfect.

  • The tragic figure has a tragic flaw (hamartia), that could be an excess of a particular virtue.
  • The tragic figure’s downfall is his/her own fault.
  • The punishment exceeds the crime. Downfall has a ripple effect.
  • The tragic fall is not pure loss. Gain in self knowledge.
Tragedy according to Aristotle
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How could Lance Armstrong be considered a tragic figure? What was his tragic flaw? Was he responsible for his own downfall?

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What is your hamartia? What can you do to keep it under control so it does not cause your personal downfall?