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DDC – PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVER PowerPoint Presentation
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DDC – PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVER

DDC – PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVER

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DDC – PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVER

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  1. DDC – PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVER Presented By: Les Nugen

  2. Housekeeping Items • Should take about 4 ½ hours • Breaks as needed • Restrooms located? • Registration • Remove registration cards from center of handbook • Complete ALL sections NEATLY • Unreadable = no credit!

  3. Course Goal • Present and review information on how to improve your defensive driving skills – skills that may save your life and help avoid collisions and violations

  4. Question • How many people do you think were killed in traffic collisions in the U.S. last year? • 41,300

  5. Question • How many people do you think are injured in motor vehicle collisions every year? • 2,200,000

  6. Question • How much do you think these collisions cost? • $181,500,000,000

  7. This is almost 113 people killed per day and 6,027 injured at a cost per day of $497,300,000

  8. How many truck drivers are killed every year in CMV collisions? • Between 700-800!!! • Trucking has the most occupational related deaths of any industry!

  9. Commercial Vehicle Stats • CMV were involved in only 3.8% of all motor vehicle collisions, but 8% of all CMV collisions result in death.

  10. Collisions • Has anyone here been involved in a collision? • Was anyone hurt? • How much did it cost? • The actual costs are usually much more than just physical damage, liability, and cargo

  11. What is Defensive Driving? • Driving to save Lives, Time, and Money in spite of the conditions around you and the actions of others

  12. Rule #1 For Today • NO COMPLAINING! • You cannot control the actions of others – only yourself • We are here to talk about how to avoid collisions – IN SPITE OF THE ACTIONS OF OTHERS • Complaining will not accomplish this goal

  13. Rule #2 For the Road • Assume all other drivers are completely INSANE!

  14. What is an Accident? • “an unfortunate event resulting from unavoidablecauses? • To call a vehicle collision an “accident” is not really accurate • Collisions are usually avoidable by one or more of the drivers involved. • Collisions can be prevented

  15. What is a Preventable Collision? • “a collision in which the driver failed to do everything reasonable to avoid it” • Key word being REASONABLE!

  16. Contributing Factors • All factors or causes of collisions can be put into one of three categories: • Driver • Vehicle • Conditions

  17. What Can You Control? • Driver & Vehicle • Conditions are outside of your control • E.g. weather, construction, OTHER DRIVERS

  18. Preventability • Over 80% of all collisions can be attributed to driver error • Translation – over 80% of collisions could be prevented by the person behind the wheel

  19. Concentrate on Your Driving • You make approximately 180 decisions per minute while driving • Doing other tasks just adds to this total • If you make the right decision 99% of the time, you are making 108 mistakes per hour! • In a ten hour run that is 1080 mistakes!

  20. DDC Collision Prevention Formula • Recognize the hazard • Understand the defense • Act correctly, in time

  21. How to Anticipate & Recognize Driving Hazards • The ‘What If Strategy”

  22. Let’s watch a video • It summarizes the points we have discussed so far, and focuses more on preventability of accidents

  23. Session Two: Professional Drivers’ Characteristics

  24. Quick Review • What were the three categories that causes of collisions fit into from section one? • Driver • Vehicle • Conditions • This session will focus on YOU the driver

  25. Characteristics of a Professional Driver • Courteous • Attentive -“Senses” what others will do…or not do • Does not make risky moves • Allows a “safety cushion” around the truck • Good judgment & skills • Desire to improve

  26. Characteristics of an Unprofessional Driver • Tailgates and intimidates • Cuts people off • Changes lanes unnecessarily • Excessive speed • Rude, vulgar on CB to other drivers • Thinks the bigger vehicle will win

  27. What Should a Pro do to Improve Driving Skills? • Keep up-to-date on traffic laws • Review defensive driving skills & techniques • Listen to experiences of other drivers, and try to learn from them • Try to identify bad unsafe habits and correct them

  28. What Type of Knowledge Must You Have? • Rules of the road (federal & state) • Safe/proper vehicle operations • Transportation paperwork • Basic truck mechanics • Load securement • Trip planning • CDL requirements

  29. What is Foresight? • That “sixth sense” that drivers develop through experience • The ability to anticipate what can happen down the road • Translation: Knowing when another driver is going to do something stupid and dangerous!

  30. Use Your Biggest Advantage • CMV drivers sit up much higher than most drivers • This allows you to see further down the road • Combine this advantage with proper scanning techniques to detect potential hazards – and be prepared to deal with them

  31. Don’t Give Up Your Advantage • Following too closely to another truck takes away your sight advantage! • When you follow too close you are letting the driver of the truck in front of you drive your truck for you

  32. Examples of Good Judgment? • Passing when it is safe and legal • Driving according to the conditions around you • Not taking unnecessary risks

  33. What are some driver conditions that may affect driving ability? • Stress • Emotions • Attitude • Fatigue • Physical health – sickness, medications, etc • Vision & hearing • Mobility

  34. Take a Pre-Trip Mental Inventory • Ask yourself, how do I feel? • Tired? Tense? Sick? Fine? • What problems are you aware of that will be part of the trip? • Construction zones, rush hour, shipper/receiver • Take these factors into consideration during the day

  35. Driver Factors are Divided into Two Categories • Physical • Mental

  36. Causes of Physical & Emotional Stress • Work schedule • Family problems • Work problems – dispatchers, safety directors • Road/weather conditions • Traffic – other drivers • Vehicle conditions – breakdowns, etc.

  37. What Types of Drivers Do You Encounter? • Tony Stewart – aggressive, moving in & out • Grandpa Simpson – nowhere to go, nothing to do • “I don’t want to follow the big truck, but don’t want them behind me either” • Guinness world record holder for the shortest following distance • Professional

  38. Stress Reducers • Relaxation techniques • Allow extra time for unexpected • Take a break • Ignore other drivers attitudes • Let dangerous drivers get ahead of you • Balance work and personal life • LAUGH IT OFF

  39. Fatigue • Caused by stress, lack of quality sleep, too many hours behind the wheel, changing schedules, etc. • Two periods when most collisions occur: • Between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. • Between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. • These are your body’s natural down times

  40. How to Reduce Fatigue • Get quality sleep • At least 7 hours per day • Block out light, noise, etc. • Plan sleep time into your trips • Avoid heavy meals before bedtime • Get regular exercise - maintain good health

  41. Physical Requirements • Vision – 20/40 in both eyes • Peripheral vision at least 70 degrees • Blood pressure – 140/90 max • Hearing – forced whisper at 5 feet • No insulin dependent diabetic condition • No loss of foot, leg, hand, or arm

  42. Session Three – Driving Large Vehicles

  43. Session Three Topics • The other controllable factor • VEHICLE • Vehicle inspections • Blind spots • Effects of freight on handling • Stopping distance & following distance

  44. Pre-Trip Inspections • Consists of more than – the truck starts, it has fuel, and oil pressure…it shifts into gear and drives. • You are a key component in any company maintenance program & safety program • Thorough Pre-Trips help cut down on breakdowns, collisions, and out of service violations

  45. Driver Responsibility • Drivers are required under 396.13 to be satisfied that the vehicle is in safe operating condition before driving the vehicle

  46. Most Common Out Of Service Violations • Brakes • Lights • Tires

  47. In-route Inspections • Normal load – every 150 miles or 3 hours • Hazmat load- every 100 miles or 2 hours • Check the following: • Oil/water • Brakes • Tires • Cargo(chains, straps, tarps) • Yourself

  48. While Driving • Listen – strange or new noises • Smell – unusual odors • Feel – changes in handling, vibrations • Observe – gauges, parts (lights, turn signals, cargo securement, etc)

  49. Post-Trip • Should be thorough so that mechanics can be notified of needed repairs • Should complete the DVIR every day you are on duty