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Phenotype and Environment Interaction. Chad Bonstead Denise Fancher Julie Kondoff Matt Luensmann. What is a Genotype?. “internally coded, inheritable information” Coded language, “blueprint” Cannot be observed Codes for protein synthesis. Phenotype is…. “outward physical manifestation”

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phenotype and environment interaction

Phenotype and Environment Interaction

Chad Bonstead

Denise Fancher

Julie Kondoff

Matt Luensmann

what is a genotype
What is a Genotype?
  • “internally coded, inheritable information”
  • Coded language, “blueprint”
  • Cannot be observed
  • Codes for protein synthesis
phenotype is
Phenotype is…
  • “outward physical manifestation”
  • Physical parts
  • Anything that is part of the observable structure, function, or behavior
genotype codes for phenotype
Genotype Codes For Phenotype
  • The genotype holds the instructions that are interpreted to depict the phenotype.
  • Controls formation of macromolecules, and the regulation of metabolism and synthesis
  • Sum of atoms, molecules, macromolecules, cells, structure, metabolism, energy utilization, tissues, organs, reflexes, and behavior
environmental factors
Environmental Factors
  • Climate
    • Temperature
    • Sunlight
    • Precipitation
  • Air Pollution
  • Soil
temperature
Temperature

Plant growth is vitally dependent on temperature.

precipitation
Precipitation

Plant growth is dependent on water.

sunlight
Sunlight
  • Light Intensity
  • Quality of Light
  • Light Duration
air pollution
Air Pollution
  • Symptoms
    • Stunted growth
    • Leaf drop
    • Abortion of flowers
    • Yellowed or mottled foliage
  • Factors
    • Type and concentration of pollutants
    • Distance from pollution source
    • Length of exposure
    • Weather
  • Examples
    • Ozone
    • Peroxyacetyl Nitrate
    • Ethylene
    • Sulfur Dioxide
    • Fluorides
    • Chlorine
slide10
Soil
  • Plants need 16 essential nutrients, 13 of which are found in the soil.
  • Soil texture
    • Sand
    • Silt
    • Clay
  • Soil pH
soil ph and plant phenotype
Soil pH and Plant Phenotype
  • What determines a soil’s pH?
  • Examples of the pH scale:

< 4.5 = extremely acidic (lemon)

4.5 - 5.0 = very strongly acidic (tomato)

5.1 - 5.5 = strongly acidic (carrot)

5.6 - 6.0 = moderately acidic (potato)

6.1 - 6.5 = slightly acidic (milk)

6.6 - 7.3 = neutral (saliva)

7.4 - 7.8 = slightly alkaline (eggs)

7.9 - 8.4 = moderately alkaline (sea water)

8.5 - 9.0 = strongly alkaline (borax)

9.1+ = very strongly alkaline (ammonia)

effects of soil ph on plants

Effects of Soil pH on Plants

Solubility of minerals and nutrients, especially aluminum.

Most nutrients are more soluble in acidic soils.

Special case: Phosphorous

The presence and availability of these minerals determines several plant characteristics.

hydrangeas
Hydrangeas
  • Aluminum in acidic soil causes Hydrangeas to bloom dark blue.
why adjust soil ph
Why Adjust Soil pH?
  • A pH range from about 6 to 7 is ideal for most plants.
  • Some plants, like conifers and potatoes, are especially adapted to acidic soils.
  • Highly alkaline soils cut iron supply to plants, especially Oaks. (chlorosis)
how to adjust soil ph
How to adjust soil pH
  • Test soil pH using a sample test kit.
the future

The Future

What’s Being Done and

Where Do We Go From Here?

lignin research
Lignin Research
  • “Glue” providing structural support
  • Goal to produce specialize plants and trees for forestry and agriculture
  • Directly connected with the enzyme laccase
  • Research is in developmental stages
    • Risk vs. Reward
    • Possible Advancements
global warming
Global Warming
  • Consequence of human activity
  • Bleak and threatening outlook for plant and animal life
  • Possible remedies/solutions
    • Limit energy usage
    • Air Pollution
    • Waste and Recycling
    • Stay informed
bioengineered crops
Bioengineered Crops
  • Farm level adoption of GE crops
  • Future Applications
    • Benefits and Risks
    • Public Perception
    • Examples include herbicide-tolerant corn and soybeans, Bt cotton and corn
bt corn bacillus thuringiensis
Bt CornBacillus thuringiensis
  • Advantages
    • Less Pesticide
    • Better Yields
bt corn bacillus thuringiensis1
Bt CornBacillus thuringiensis
  • Disadvantages
    • Resistance
    • Public View
summary
Summary
  • New research techniques
  • Threat of Global Warming
  • Impact of biotechnology
  • Where do we come in?
    • Stay informed
    • Seek current, accurate information
sources
Sources
  • Genotype and Phenotype Research

http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/ahp/BioInfo/SD.Geno.HP.html

http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/ahp/BioInfo/GP/GeneticTrait.html

http://www.kursus.kv1.dk/shares/vetgen/_Popgen/genetics/1/1/tsld011.htm

  • Brickell, Christopher and Elvin McDonald. The American Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Gardening, DK Publishing, Inc., 1993.
  • Novak, Joe. Garden Science: Lecture Supplement for HORT 301 Horticultural Techniques, Texas A&M University, 2003.
  • Preece, John E. and Paul E. Reed. The Biology of Horticulture: An Introductory Textbook, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1993.
  • USDA Hardiness Zone Maphttp://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/ushzmap.html
  • US Average Annual Precipitation Maphttp://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/pdf/usclim.pdf
  • Effect of Light on Plant Growth

http://www.biology-online.org/3/9_effect_light.htm

  • Blue Hydrangea Photohttp://www.conweb.com/hydrangea/
  • White Hydrangea Photohttp://greenwoodnursery.com/page.cfm/1281
  • Pink Hydrangea Photohttp://www.pottedliners.com/article.htm
more sources
More Sources
  • North America Soil pH Map

http://atlas.sage.wisc.edu/maps/soilph/atl_soilph_nam.jpg

  • Soil pH effects page

http://www.esf.edu/pubprog/brochure/soilph.htm

  • Lignin Research

http://www.forestry.uga.edu/warnell/research/html/wildlife/lignin.html

  • Global Warming

http://weathersavvy.com/GlobalWarming5.html

http://nvnv.essortmen.com/globalwarmingp_rgby.htm

http://www.usatoday.com/news/science/climate/2002-06-03-epa-report.htm

http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_energy/renewable_energy/page.cfm?pageID=91

  • Bioengineering and Bt Corn

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aer810/aer810b.pdf

http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/courses/ent110/docs/Weighing_BTcorn.pdf

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/agcomm/magazine/summer00/assess.htm

http://reason.com/bi/bi-gmf.shtml

  • Air Pollution

http://www.aces.edu/department/ipm/poldmge.htm

All websites current as of February 27, 2003.

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