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Coleman 2011. Homonyms Week 2. What is a homonym?. Words that are spelled the same but pronounced differently OR Words that are pronounced the same but spelled differently. I ACCEPT you the way you are, EXCEPT when your word usage is wrong!.

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what is a homonym
What is a homonym?
  • Words that are spelled the same but pronounced differently

OR

  • Words that are pronounced the same but spelled differently
i accept you the way you are except when your word usage is wrong
I ACCEPT you the way you are, EXCEPT when your word usage is wrong!

Most people pronounce these the same way; therefore, it is difficult for some to judge in which situation to use which spelling. These two words are nearly antonyms, or opposites of each other, so it is very important to know the difference!

accept
ACCEPT
  • Use ACCEPT as a verb meaning “to receive.”
    • I accept the fact that he is gone.
    • We accept you into our school.
    • Will you accept my apology?
except
EXCEPT
  • Except is usually a preposition meaning "but" or "leaving out." However, except can also be a verb meaning "to leave out."
    • He excepted the twins. (He did not include them.)
    • We invited everyone except Bill. (All but Bill)

MEMORY TRICK: Remember that the prefix ex- means “out of”, so EXCEPT means to LEAVE OUT.

i want more than two people to get this right and you should too
I want more than TWO people TO get this right, and you should TOO!
  • Use TO as a preposition before a noun or as an infinitive before a verb.
    • Please take me to the dance.
    • We don’t need to buy that right now.
i want more than two people to get this right and you should too1
I want more than TWO people TO get this right, and you should TOO!
  • Use TOO as a synonym for ALSO, or to indicate excessiveness before a verb. Usually, if you can replace too with also in the same sentence, and it still makes sense, then you are using it correctly.
    • I am going to the mall, too. (I am going to the mall also.)
    • I had too many tacos for lunch. (I had an excessive amount of tacos for lunch.)
i want more than two people to get this right and you should too2
I want more than TWO people TO get this right, and you should TOO!
  • Use TWO to spell out the number 2. If you can replace two with 2 in the same sentence, and it still makes sense, then you are using it correctly. This should be the easiest one!
    • I have two hands and two feet.
    • Can you give me two dollars?
bored board
BORED/BOARD
  • BORED is an adjective describing when someone is weary from a dull, tedious task.
  • BORED can also be a verb, past tense of BORE, meaning to make a hole in something (as with a drill)
    • I had been sitting behind a desk all day, and was getting bored.
    • The construction worker bored a hole through the plywood.
bored board1
BORED/BOARD
  • A BOARD is a flat piece of wood or a flat piece of any rigid material used for a specific purpose.
    • The teacher asked her students to do a problem on the blackboard.
    • I stumbled over the board at the hardwood store.
  • BOARD could also be a verb, meaning to cover or close with boards.
    • I need to board up the windows to prepare for the storm.
choose chose
CHOOSE/CHOSE
  • These words are not homonyms, but they are commonly confused.
  • CHOOSE is a verb used in the present or future tense:
    • I choose to work independently.
    • Today I will choose new group leaders.
  • CHOSE is the past tense of the verb.
    • Yesterday I chose to walk home.