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Regional College Readiness Partnership New Standards Retreat Northern Illinois University September 2013 Susan C. Lane, Senior Director P-16 Alignment and Engagement Massachusetts Department of Higher Education. National Perspective: The Common Core State Standards.

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slide1

Regional College Readiness

Partnership

New Standards Retreat

Northern Illinois University

September 2013

Susan C. Lane, Senior Director

P-16 Alignment and Engagement

Massachusetts Department of Higher Education

national perspective the common core state standards
National Perspective:The Common Core State Standards
  • What do post- secondary faculty need to know about:
    • the Common Core State Standards,
    • Next –Generation Science Standards and
    • the PARCC Assessments?
  • What do post- secondary faculty need to know about:
    • A definition of College and Career Readiness
slide5

The Common Core State Standards Identify a Set of Core Competencies that Represent A Baseline for College and Career Readiness

why common core state standards
Why Common Core State Standards?
  • What do Common Core State Standards (CCSS) address
    • Disparate standards across the states
    • Global, not neighborhood competition
    • For many young people, high school was not preparing them for college or careers
  • Why CCSS are Important
    • Prepare students with knowledge and skills to succeed in college and career
    • Ensure consistent expectations regardless of a student’s zip code
    • Provide educators, parents and students with clear, focused guideposts
    • Offer economies of scale and sharing of best practices
the common core state standards initiative
The Common Core State Standards Initiative
  • Beginning in the spring of 2009, Governors and state commissioners of education from 48 states, 2 territories and the District of Columbia committed to developing a common core of state K-12 English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics standards.
  • The Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI) was a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO).
  • Illinois adopted the CCSS (2010)
  • Illinois is participating as a governing state in PARCC, the national project to develop an assessment system (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers)
  • Illinois’ State Board of Education website features “Realizing Illinois” – The New Illinois Learning Standards Incorporating the Common Core and College and Career Readiness.
45 states dc have adopted the common core state standards
45 States + DC Have Adopted the Common Core State Standards

* Minnesota adopted the CCSS in ELA only

slide9
More than 60 Illinois State Educators, Administrators and Policy Makers are Assisting in Developing the PARCC Assessments

Governing Board:

  • Christopher Koch, State Superintendent of Education, Illinois State Board of Education

Advisory Committee on College Readiness:

  • Sheila Simon, Lieutenant Governor, State of Illinois

PARCC K-12 State Leads/Governing Board Deputies:

  • Dan Long, PARCC Project Director, Illinois State Board of Education
  • Susie Morrison, Deputy Superintendent, Illinois State Board of Education
  • Mary O’Brian, Director of Assessment, Illinois State Board of Education

Higher Education Leadership Team Members:

  • Daniel Cullen, Deputy Director, Illinois Board of Higher Education
  • Brian Durham, Senior Director for Academic Affairs, Illinois Community College Board
why common core state standards1
Why Common Core State Standards?
  • Preparation: The standards are college- and career-ready. They will help prepare students with the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in education and training after high school.
  • Competition: The standards are internationally benchmarked. Common standards will help ensure our students are globally competitive.
  • Equity: Expectations are consistent for all – and not dependent on a student’s zip code
  • Clarity: The standards are focused, coherent, and clear. Clearer standards help students (and parents and teachers) understand what is expected of them.
  • Collaboration: The standards create a foundation to work collaboratively across states and districts, pooling resources and expertise, to create curricular tools, professional development, common assessments and other materials.
common core state standards
Common Core State Standards
  • What is different and what do these changes mean for the higher education classroom?--- Robert Rothman – Senior Fellow at the Alliance for Excellent Education commented in the Harvard Education Press July/Aug 2012
  • While many say these standards are “new” others , particularly teachers of mathematics say “they are pretty much the same” as their current standards.
common core state standards1
Common Core State Standards
  • In Mathematics
    • Greater Focus
    • Coherence
    • Skills, Understanding, and Application
    • Emphasis on Practices
  • In English Language Arts
    • More Nonfiction
    • Focus on Evidence
    • Staircase of Text Complexity
    • Speaking and Listening
    • Literacy in Content Areas
  • Robert Rothman- “Nine Ways the Common Core Will Change Classroom Practice”
  • Harvard Education Letter; Vol 28, No 4, July/Aug 2012
important to higher education faculty ela and literacy standards
Important to Higher Education Faculty:ELA and Literacy Standards
  • Colleges and universities require students to –
    • Analyze complex text
    • Conductresearch and apply that research to solve problems or address a particular issue
    • Identifyareas for research, narrow those topics and adjust research methodology as necessary, and evaluate and synthesize primary and secondary resources as they develop and defend their own conclusions
  • Standards require students to –
    • Conductshort, focused projects and longer term in-depth research
    • Identify and analyze credible information
    • Communicate research findings both verbally and in writing
important to higher education faculty high school mathematics standards
Important to Higher Education Faculty: High School Mathematics Standards
  • The high school mathematics standards:
    • Identify the mathematics that all students should study in order to be college and career ready
    • Emphasizemathematical modeling and the use of mathematics and statistics
      • To analyzeempirical situations,
      • Understandthem better, and
      • Improvedecisions
  • The standards require students to:
    • Apply mathematical ways of thinking to real world issues and challenges
    • Develop a depth of understanding and ability to apply mathematics to novel situations
claims driving design mathematics
Claims Driving Design: Mathematics

Students are on-track or ready for college and careers

key advances of the common core
Key Advances of the Common Core

ANCHORED IN COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS

key mathematics shifts in the common core state standards
Key Mathematics Shifts in the Common Core State Standards
  • Each grade focuses on fewer standards:
    • addresses them more deeply
    • coherent progression across grades
  • Conceptual understanding of topics is foundational
  • Students are expected to extend their knowledge to real-life modeling & application

19

slide20

Topic Placement

Top Achieving Countries

United States

key instructional shifts in mathematics
Key Instructional Shifts in Mathematics
  • The Common Core State Standards emphasize coherenceat each grade level – making connections across content and between content and mathematical practices in order to promote deeper learning.
  • The standards focus on key topics at each grade level to allow educators and students to go deeper into the content.
  • The standards also emphasize progressions across grades, with the end of progression calling forfluency – or the ability to perform calculations or solving problems quickly and accurate.
  • TheStandards for Mathematical Practicedescribe mathematical “habits of mind” or mathematical applicationsand aim to foster reasoning, problem solving, modeling, decision making, and engagement among students.
  • Finally, the standards require students to demonstrate deep conceptual understanding by applying them to new situations.
organization of ccss for mathematics
ORGANIZATION OF CCSS FOR MATHEMATICS

Grade-Level Standards

  • K-8 grade-by-grade standards organized by domain
  • 9-12 high school standards organized by conceptual categories

Standards for Mathematical Practice

  • Describe mathematical “habits of mind”
  • Connect with content standards in each grade
common core state standards2
Common Core State Standards

PK-8 Domains Progression

Domains

PK

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Counting and Cardinality

MA

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

MA

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Number and Operations - Fractions

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

The Number System

MA

Expressions and Equations

Functions

Measurement and Data

MA

Geometry

MA

Statistics and Probability

standards for mathematical practice
STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICAL PRACTICE

Eight Standards for Mathematical Practice

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the understanding of others
  • Model with mathematics
  • Use appropriate tools strategically
  • Attend to precision
  • Look for and make use of structure
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning
overview of high school mathematics standards
OVERVIEW OF HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS STANDARDS

The high school mathematics standards:

  • Call on students to practice applying mathematical ways of thinking to real world issues and challenges
  • Require students to develop a depth of understanding and ability to apply mathematics to novel situations, as college students and employees regularly are called to do
  • Emphasize mathematical modeling, the use of mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, understand them better, and improve decisions
  • Identify the mathematics that all students should study in order to be college and career ready
common core state standards for ela literacy
Common Core State Standards For ELA/LITERACY

College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards

  • Overarching standards for each strand that are further defined by grade-specific standards

Grade-Level Standards in English Language Arts

  • K-8, grade-by-grade
  • 9-10 and 11-12 grade bands for high school
  • Four strands: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language

Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

  • Standards are embedded at grades K-5
  • Content-specific literacy standards are provided for grades 6-8, 9-10, and 11-12
key instructional shifts in ela literacy
KEY INSTRUCTIONAL SHIFTS IN ELA/LITERACY
  • In Reading, the major advances are the shift away from literature-focused standards to a balance of literature and informational textsto reflect college- and career-ready expectations. There is also a greater focus on text complexityand at what level students should be reading.
  • In Writing, there is a strong emphasis on argument and informative/ explanatory writing, along with an emphasis on writing about sources or using evidence to inform an argument.
  • The Common Core also include Speaking and Listening expectations, including a focus on formal and informal talk, which can be done through presentations and group work.
  • The Languagestandards put a stress on both general academic and domain-specificvocabulary.
  • The Common Core also addressreading, writing and literacy across the curriculum, and include literacy standards for science, social studies and technical subjects. These standards complement rather than replace content standards in those subjects, and are the responsibility of teachers in those specific disciplines, making literacy a shared responsibility across educators.
shift 1 regular practice with complex text and its academic language
Shift 1: Regular practice with complex text and its academic language
  • PARCC builds a staircase of text complexity to ensure students are on track each year for college and career reading.
  • PARCC rewards careful, close reading rather than racing through passages.
  • PARCC systematically focuses on the words that matter most—not obscure vocabulary, but the academic language that pervades complex texts.
shift 2 reading and writing grounded in evidence from text literary and informational
Shift 2: Reading and writing grounded in evidencefrom text, literary and informational
  • PARCC focuses on students rigorously citing evidence from texts throughout the assessment (including selected-response items).
  • PARCC includes questions with more than one right answer to allow students to generate a range of rich insights that are substantiated by evidence from text(s).
  • PARCC requires writing to sources rather than writing to de-contextualized expository prompts.
  • PARCC also includes rigorous expectations for narrative writing, including accuracy and precision in writing in later grades.
shift 3 building knowledge through content rich nonfiction
Shift 3: Building knowledge through content rich nonfiction
  • PARCC assesses not just ELA but a full range of reading and writing across the disciplines of science and social studies.
  • PARCC simulates research on the assessment, including the comparison and synthesis of ideas across a range of informational sources.
lead state partners and ngss writing team
Lead State Partners and NGSS Writing Team

Writing Team Only

Lead State Partner Only

Lead State Partner and Writing Team

conceptual shifts in the ngss
Conceptual Shifts in the NGSS
  • K-12 Science Education Should Reflect the Interconnected Nature of Science as it is Practiced and Experienced in the Real World.
  • The Next Generation Science Standards are student performance expectations – NOT curriculum.
  • The science concepts build coherently from K-12.
  • The NGSS Focus on Deeper Understanding of Content as well as Application of Content.
  • Science and Engineering are Integrated in the NGSS from K–12.
  • NGSS content is focused on preparing students for the next generation workforce.
  • The NGSS and Common Core State Standards ( English Language Arts and Mathematics) are Aligned.
incorporating math practices into performance tasks
Incorporating Math Practices into Performance Tasks

Compare the level of rigor of these tasks by identifying the Standard Of Mathematical Practices for each task.

Tito’s Strategy

While his class was working on multiplication facts, Tito shared his way of remembering 8 x 7. Since he knew that 8 x 2 = 16 and 8 x 5 = 40, he could add the 16 and the 40 in his head to remember that 8 x 7 = 56.

a. Model Tito’s thinking using Base 10 blocks or linking cubes. Draw your model on grid paper.

b. Why does his method work?

c. Write a word (story) problem that could represent your model.

d. Write a number sentence that could represent your model.

Use Tito’s strategy to solve another multiplication problem.

incorporating math practices into performance tasks1
Incorporating Math Practices into Performance Tasks

Compare the level of rigor of these tasks by identifying the Standard Of Mathematical Practices for each task.

What is 8 x 7?

How do you know your answer is correct?

  • MP5 +
  • MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others: When students are asked to explain their numerical reasoning and to prove their answer is correct, they are exhibiting use of this practice.
  • MP4 Model with Mathematics:: When students draw a picture or array to explain their reasoning, they are exhibiting use of models.
incorporating math practices into performance tasks2
Incorporating Math Practices into Performance Tasks

Tito’s Strategy

  • MP5, MP3, MP4 +
  • MP6 Attend to Precision: When students are analyzing number sentences and drawing accurate models, they are attending to precision as they express the correct answers.
  • MP7 Look for and Make use of Structure: When students are able to use common sense and observe that a pattern seen in one situation (i.e., 7 things = 2 things + 5 things) can be applied in another situation (i.e.,7 groups of 8 is the same as 2 groups of 8 plus 5 groups of 8) they are exhibiting use of this practice.
  • MP8 Look for and Express Regularity in Repeated Reasoning: When students are able to generalize a given numerical situation or method (i.e., Tito’s strategy) and extend it onto another problem, context, or situation, they are expressing regularity in this repeated reasoning.
example of grade level progression in reading
EXAMPLE OF GRADE-LEVEL PROGRESSION IN READING
  • CCR Reading Standard 3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
understanding the literary analysis task
Understanding the Literary Analysis Task
  • Students carefully consider two literary texts worthy of close study.
  • They are asked to answer a few questions about each text to demonstrate their ability to do close analytic reading and to compare and synthesize ideas.
  • Students write a literary analysis about the two texts.
slide44

Narrowing the Grade 10

Income-Based Achievement Gap in Massachusetts

English Language Arts

Mathematics

Low Income: +22

Not Low Income: +14

Low Income: +26

Not Low Income: +20

Advanced

Proficient

Needs Improvement

Failing

slide45
High remediation rates across the country represent

discrepancies between student K-12 academic preparation and academic expectations of postsecondary institutions.

slide46
N

White

African American

Latino

Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. March Current Population Surveys, 1971-2008, in The Condition of Education 2009. http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2009/pdf/23_2009.pdf

why higher standards and new assessments now
Why Higher Standards and New Assessments Now?

By the year 2020, 65% of all jobs will require some postsecondary education or training.

To ensure future economic sustainability, we must prepare all students to access postsecondary opportunities:

  • The PARCC assessment system will impact 23 million students. 9 million of these students attend Title I schools.
  • Our K–12 system is not adequately preparing students for college
  • CCSS and PARCC have potential to substantially improve educational equity, postsecondary opportunity, and economic mobility if implemented with fidelity by K-12 and embraced by postsecondary institutions.

1/3 of college freshmen need remedial courses

slide48
M

MA Public HS Graduates Enrollment in Developmental Courses in Initial Fall Term

Math

2004

Writing

2009

Source: Massachusetts Department of Higher Education (DHE)

why college and career readiness the rationale for change
Why College and Career Readiness?The Rationale for Change
  • Our current marker (MCAS)is 10th grade requirements for the Competency Determination (CD).
  • One-quarter of our students do not enroll in college within 16 months of graduating from high school.
  • 37% of graduates take at least one remedial course during their first semester in college; that number rises to 65% at community colleges.
slide50
Definition of College and Career Readiness

College Readiness

P-16 Campus Engagement Teams and Regional Readiness Centerscollaborated on a shared definition of college readiness for Massachusetts.

Career Readiness

Integrating College and Career Readiness Task Force developed a definition of career readiness for Massachusetts.

Each calls for integration in Massachusetts’ final statewide definition

Massachusetts PARCC Coordinating Council drafted statewide definition.

Public review of draft definition in Fall 2012

The Boards of Elementary and Secondary Education and Higher Education approved Spring 2013

survey on draft definition
Definition of College and Career ReadinessSurvey on Draft Definition
  • Participants were asked about each section of the definition:

81%In Agreement

88%In Agreement

91% In Agreement

summary of statewide definition
Definition of College & Career ReadinessSummary of Statewide Definition
  • Overview
    • Academic knowledge, experiences, and intellectual and personal qualities that are important to successful completion of entry-level, credit-bearing college courses (without need for remediation) and entry into economically viable career pathways
summary of statewide definition1
Definition of College & Career ReadinessSummary of Statewide Definition
  • Essential Competencies
    • Learning
      • Academic preparation in English language arts/literacy and mathematics as contained in the Common Core State Standards and MassCore
    • Workplace Readiness
      • Career awareness, exploration and immersion; work ethic and professionalism; understanding of workplace culture, policy and safety; teamwork and collaboration; technical skills; knowing how to learn
    • Qualities and Strengths
      • Learning strategies, collaboration, communication, and problem-solving skills
      • Higher order thinking skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and thinking critically, coherently, and creatively
      • Intellectual foundation grounded by motivation, intellectual curiosity, flexibility, discipline, self-advocacy, responsibility, and reasoned beliefs
common core state standards definition of college and career readiness and parcc the potential
Common Core State Standards, Definition of College and Career Readiness and PARCCThe Potential