Reasons to Use the Dissection Video and Accompanying PowerPoint Presentation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Reasons to Use the Dissection Video and Accompanying PowerPoint Presentation

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  1. Dissection 101: • Reasons to Use the Dissection Video and • Accompanying PowerPoint Presentation • Reduce the number of specimens used by a class • Increase the quality of the dissection for the students • Review opportunity, increasing the learning experience for the students • Student unable to dissect due to pregnancy or hypersensitivity to the preservatives • Student chooses not to dissect due to ethical/moral reasons Click

  2. Dissection 101: As an educator you are responsible for the implementation of the dissection activity described in the video and PowerPoint. You must have safety procedures and rules established for your classroom and make sure all of the students follow the rules to ensure a safe environment. South Dakota Public Broadcasting and Dakota State University cannot in any way be responsible or liable for any injury as a result of performing the described dissection. Complete the dissection if you feel it is appropriate and safe for your individual class. Have fun and stay safe! • Safety Considerations • Age appropriate activity for the children in your care • Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) available for accident reference • Poison control number/phone readily available • Latex free gloves, eye protection and apron/lab coat • Eyewash station, shower and sink • Sharp instruments (cut away from self and others) • Sharps and specimen(s) disposal • Encourage students to report all accidents • Basic science laboratory rules (strictly enforced) Click

  3. Clam Dissection 101: Click

  4. Exterior of the Clam Clam Dissection 101: Dorsal (hinge side) Umbo (location): Shell originates from here (oldest section of the shell) Shell produced by mantel in a series of rings, similar to the rings of a tree – does not indicate age Orientation Posterior (greater distance from umbo) Anterior (closer to umbo) Wood inserted during preserving process to keep the clam open for dissection Ventral (foot side - movement) Click

  5. Exterior of the Clam Bivalve (2 shells) Umbo Dorsal (top view) Hinge Click

  6. Clam Dissection 101: Cut both adductor muscles on either side of the hinge; do not cut through the middle of the clam (dorsal side: posterior and anterior) Slowly open the clam; continue to cut the adductor muscles if there is resistance. Always cut away from your hands and fingers Click

  7. Clam Dissection 101: Many times one of the mantles will rip when the clam is pulled apart. This is not part of the clam. It is an extra piece of wood accidentally left in the clam during preserving process. Click

  8. Identify the following Structures Adductor muscles (2) relaxed – clam opens contracted – clam closes Click

  9. Identify the following Structures Nacre/Mother of pearl Iridescent layer of the shell, pearls form here (torn) Pallial line Location on shell where mantle attaches Mantle Produces shell and provides protective and lubricated surface for the body structures Click

  10. Identify the following Structures Labial pulps (4) Two on each side of the mouth, used to sort food and move it toward the mouth Mantle Produces the shell Muscular Foot Used for movement, appears shrunken in preserved clam Gills (respiratory) Used to remove oxygen from the water Mantle Produces the shell Click

  11. Identify the following Structures Visceral mass Thick area above foot, digestive glands, intestines and gonads located here Top View Foot Gills have feather- like appearance, usually two on each side Visceral mass Foot Mantle Click

  12. Identify the following Structures Gills, mantle and labial pulps removed Tube-like intestines wind through the visceral mass Visceral mass with outer layer removed Digestive glands (usually green) produces enzymes to digest food Gonads (usually yellowish/white) reproductive function Click

  13. Identify the following Structures Heart (exposed by removing protective membrane) Each specimen may appear a little different, damaged adductor muscle shown here (could indicate some type of disease or condition that attacked the muscle) Gills, mantle, outer covering of visceral mass and labial pulps removed Click

  14. Clam Dissection 101: Produced by Dakota State University and South Dakota Public Broadcasting