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YELLOWKNIFE

YELLOWKNIFE

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YELLOWKNIFE

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  1. YELLOWKNIFE Clara Yoo Angela Xu Celia Yang

  2. Extends over the Cordillera, the Interior Plains and the Canadian Shield • Almost half the population is made up of Aboriginal people (Inuit, • Dene, Métis)

  3. YELLOWKNIFE • Capital & the largest city of the Northwest Territories • Located on the northern shore of the Great Bear Lake • On the subarctic taiga shield

  4. CLIMATE • In the subarctic taiga shield… • Rainfall is low • Snow on the ground for 8 months of the year • Severe winter • Mean January temperatures fall down to -30°C • Warmest month average temperature does not exceed 10°C

  5. CLIMATE • Summer is less harsh • July temperatures similar to the prairie provinces • Daytime 20 ~ 23 hour • Bright summers activate • the considerable insect population

  6. TOURISM harsh northern wilderness with difficult access and few Inhabitants • Important to the economy of the Northwest Territories • Economic base for native groups • Heavily dependent on Japanese and American visitors • Tourist activities: kayaking, fishing, hunting, hiking, appreciation of Inuit/Dene/Métis culture

  7. TOURISM THE NORTHERN LIGHTS/AURORA VIEWING • Aurora borealis / The Northern Lights • Illuminations, causing spectacular displays of streaming coloured light in northern skies, that occur regularly in the long winter nights • A significant segment for the tourism industry of the Northwest Territories

  8. Dene People -Belongs to Athapaskan family, -Small bands of hunters who followed migrating caribou into areas near Great Slave Lake, Great Bear Lake and along the Mackenzie River - Use birth bark canoes, bow and arrow, and snowshoes to hunt Caribous and fish

  9. Positive Aspects of Mining • Reduces poverty rate • Improves quality of lives • The community values sharing among members, and high income allows them to afford more goods to foster the sharing ethics.

  10. Negative Aspects of Mining • Decreases hunting activities • Decreases consumption of country food - Environmental pollution ( eg: 237,000 tons of arsenic at Giant Mine) - The cyclic nature of mining is stressful ( eg, 2 weeks on and 2 weeks off schedule, a maximum of 12 hrs per day) - Alcoholism ( increases work-absence)

  11. Klondike Gold Rush 1897 to 1898 Gold discovered in Klondike River Miners especially from US came to pan for gold E.A. Blankey first discovery in Yellowknife Bay area 1890s But area considered too far away

  12. Gold • Great Bear Lake – silver and uranium discovered 1920s • 1933 discovered gold along Yellowknife River • 1934 Yellowknife Bay area gold discovered • Burwash Mine • Con Mine

  13. Development First bank, hotel and a newspaper in 1938 1939 first school and making into administrative district 1940 population 1000 and 5 gold mines operating 1940s slow period during war Post war new discoveries –boom 1953 Yellowknife municipality

  14. Cultural 1960 Yellowknife Highway 1967 Capital of NWT 1970 First Arctic Winter Games 1984 Northern Arts and Cultural Center 1992 Aboriginal Peoples TV network 1993 New building with reference to Inuit culture

  15. New Era 1991 New rush – diamonds 1998 First diamond mine in Canada 2008 Closing of last of the gold mines –end of a significant period of history

  16. THE END