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Four Kinds of Students What proportion of the following kinds of students are in the classes you teach?. A. Managed by normal curriculum These students manage themselves in order to learn what is contained in the curriculum. B. Managed within the class

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slide2
Four Kinds of Students

What proportion of the following kinds of students are in the classes you teach?

A. Managed by normal curriculum

These students manage themselves in order to learn what is contained in the curriculum

B. Managed within the class

These students are occasionally distracted or disruptive, but do not have to be isolated or referred to others

C. Managed out of class

These students cannot be managed as part of a group and need to be isolated, sent out or referred to others

D. Not managed

These students generally seem unmanageable no matter what is tried

slide3

Identify the two things you would probably be best at…

Identify the two things you would probably be worst at…

  • Draw a Logo suitable for your school
  • Write and sing a “jingle” suitable for advertising your school
  • Write the text for an advertisement suitable for advertising your school
  • Identify in what ways attendance at your school might change an individual’s personal life
  • Prepare with others and perform a play which depicts an ex-student trying to convince a friend to attend your school
  • Devise a research plan showing how you would be able to work out which sort of person is most attracted to attending your school
  • Do a mime depicting what it’s like attending your school
slide4

Multiple Intelligences

Children learn best in a variety of ways:

  • Verbal/Linguistic
  • Musical/Rhythmic
  • Logical/Mathematical
  • Visual/Spatial
  • Bodily/Kinesthetic
  • Intrapersonal
  • Naturalistic/Classification
  • Interpersonal
  • Existential
slide5

Multiple Intelligence

An “Intelligence” is equivalent to a “set of talents”

Multiple Intelligence is not about personality, will, morality, motivation or other psychological construct

Learning Styles may vary by content area

There is empirical support for 7 - 9 intelligences

We do not all have the same kinds of minds

Education needs to take differences into account, not ignore them

  • to develop desired talents
  • to approach subject matter in a variety of ways
  • to allow a number of ways of expressing understanding and competence
slide6

Example:

XXXXXX SECONDARY SCHOOL - SEMESTER 2, 2001

Year 8: 207 students (40% girls, 60% boys)

18 students were nominated by a group of

4 Level Coordinators as:

“destroying learning/teaching”

slide15

In general, boys perform better with

learning or assessment that is

  • Shorter (Extended)
  • Single concept (Multi concept)
  • Experiential (Reflective)
  • Action-based (Text based)
  • Structured (Unstructured)
  • Closed (Open ended)
  • Individual (Group based)
slide16

Passive learning, with extended verbal interaction and text based

instruction from the teacher could be disengaging and discouraging

groups of boys, especially in the early to middle high school years.

As a result, these boys may display challenging behaviour.

reasons for misbehaviour
Reasons for Misbehaviour

Tension Reduction:

The students needs to relieve a temporary state of frustration, anxiety, boredom, fear or excitement.

This type of student tends to respond to aspects of the school environment, e.g. type of instruction, the way the teacher handles the misbehaviour.

d students reasons for misbehaviour
D students - Reasons for Misbehaviour

Need Satisfaction:

The students needs to act disruptively to satisfy personal needs.

This type of student tends to repeatedly disrupt regardless of variations in treatment.

slide19

Dreikurs’ Analysis

  • ‘Personality’ or ‘lifestyle’ is a result of a child’s view of his or her interactions with people, particularly family members, during the early years.
  • Children develop the qualities that they hope will enable them to achieve recognition in the family.
slide20

George’s older sister receives a lot of positive recognition because she is good at math's.

  • George concludes that he cannot be as good as Sue and decides not to compete by excelling at math's.
  • He falls behind in math's and as a result his teacher gives him ‘special attention’.
  • He doesn’t improve so his father is asked to assist George with homework.
  • George now gains his father’s full attention for an hour every night.

If you were George, would you want to improve?

slide21

Belonging (or recognition) is the basic motivation for all individuals.

Difficult students believe that by adopting unacceptable ways of behaving they will gain a place in the group and salvage a sense of importance.

I belong if I am:

  • Funniest
  • Most in control
  • Smartest
  • Most looked after
  • Most powerful
  • Most approved of
  • Most hopeless
  • Best
slide22

Sources of Discouragement

  • Grading practices
  • Competitiveness in classrooms
  • Streaming
  • Emphasizing Deficiencies
  • Criticism
  • Comparison with others
  • Unreasonable expectations
  • Conditional acceptance
slide23

Theory of mistaken Goals

Difficult students give up on their true goal – to be liked. In its place they adopt one or more “mistaken” goals.

Goal 1: To be noticed X T Stop X

Goal 2: To be boss X T

Goal 3: To get even X !!!!!

Goal 4: To be left alone

slide24

How to respond to “difficult”

students (10%’s)

  • Fight your first impulse (try to understand that the student is hurting inside).
  • Encourage the student at every opportunity.
  • Separate the deed from the doer. Express a liking for the student while still applying logical consequences.
  • Show an awareness of some skill the student believes he or she is good at. If possible, set up a situation where you can observe the child being competent.
  • Have the child help you in a meaningful way.
  • Show some interest in something that interests the child.
slide25

How to respond to “difficult” students

  • Collect enough data to be confident of student’s mistaken goal
  • Make the student aware of his/her “mistaken” goals
  • Confront the student with the need to choose between his/her primary and mistaken goal
  • Inform the child (privately), during class, of the mistaken goal as he or she misbehaves
  • Modify the child’s curriculum (Usually more Kinesthetic – Visual - Rhythmic instruction)
slide27

Competence

Usefulness

Student

Self-Esteem

Belonging

slide28
Building a quality relationship with the more difficult students (for example, seeking their help)

U=Tried the strategy and use it on a regular basis 71%

S=Tried the strategy, it worked but I have stopped using it now 20% DW=Tried strategy, it didn’t work so I have stopped using it 3%

DT=Didn’t try strategy 6%

“so they feel important and recognised amongst their peers”

“I collect the jigsaw dinosaur from child packets - a difficult student now collects them for me and we are mates. He now completes his work! “

“Works well. They seem to get the attention they need without having to find it by acting out”

slide29
Communicating to the more difficult students an awareness of their competencies and/or interests

U=Tried the strategy and use it on a regular basis 81%

S=Tried the strategy, it worked but I have stopped using it now 11% DW=Tried strategy, it didn’t work so I have stopped using it 1%

DT=Didn’t try strategy 6%

“to form some sort of bond. Gives us something to talk about in detention ”

“works really well as students can see that they are good at things and just need to try other things”

“It makes them feel good and they often can’t see the things that they are good at”

slide30
Trying to engage the more difficult students by adjusting curriculum delivery (eg. Including greater student interaction, movement, visuals)

U=Tried the strategy and use it on a regular basis 79%

S=Tried the strategy, it worked but I have stopped using it now 12% DW=Tried strategy, it didn’t work so I have stopped using it 4%

DT=Didn’t try strategy 4%

“if I make the curriculum exciting the difficult students are not so difficult”

“finding areas where difficult students feel they can achieve positive results will make them feel better about their learning”,

“different courses for different horses. Therefore I use lots of visual prompts, MI stuff, auditory - music, tactile/kinaesthetic, it works everyone learns differently”

slide31
Providing opportunities for difficult students to achieve success through altering the types of assessment

U=Tried the strategy and use it on a regular basis 63%

S=Tried the strategy, it worked but I have stopped using it now 10% DW=Tried strategy, it didn’t work so I have stopped using it 3%

DT=Didn’t try strategy 22%

“I have to cater for what they can achieve”

“Difficult students usually have poor literacy skills, struggle to complete tasks so altering types of assessment helps them to stay focussed”

“Students need initial success to build on further success”

slide32

Ms Megan Moore - Principal

Marist Transition School (14/6/2004):

“And even the most apparently aggressive, defiant, oppositional child has a heart that’s crying – crying for boundaries, crying for affirmation, crying for reassurance, crying for direction, crying for success.”

“Building students’ self-esteem is one of the overriding objectives of the program, and developing students’ trust and giving them healthy doses of praise and affirmation are key aspects of the intervention.”

“The students have to learn the parameters, they have to learn that the expectations are absolute and the consequences are non-emotive.”