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What is parlimentary procedure?. Parliamentary procedure is a systematic way of organizing meetings. Parliamentary procedure is governed by Robert’s Rules of Order. General Henry M. Robert. PARLIMENTARY LAW. Main Objectives Focus on one item at a time, this helps prevent confusion.

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what is parlimentary procedure
What is parlimentary procedure?

Parliamentary procedure is a systematic way of organizing meetings.

Parliamentary procedure is governed by Robert’s Rules of Order.

General Henry M. Robert

parlimentary law
PARLIMENTARY LAW
  • Main Objectives
    • Focus on one item at a time, this helps prevent confusion.
    • Extend courtesy to everyone. You should be recognized before speaking.
    • Observing the rule of the majority keeps unpopular ideas from being adopted.
    • Ensure the rights of the minority, all sides can make motions, second motions, discuss and vote.
presiding officer
Presiding officer
  • Chapter FFA President
  • Must be fair and impartial
  • Must relinquish the chairman’s station and relinquish chairman’s duties to present or discuss a motion.
the gavel
The gavel
  • Symbol of authority
  • The president uses the gavel to control aspects of the meeting.
  • The number of taps determines the meaning.
    • One tap means to sit down, announce vote or adjourn
    • Two taps calls the meeting to order.
    • Three taps symbols to rise during opening and closing ceremonies
    • Series of taps used to bring the group to order
agenda
Agenda
  • List of what will be discussed at a meeting
  • Should be prepared in advance
motion
Motion
  • To present a new idea or item of business
  • Wording: “I move” NOT “I make a motion”
  • Types of motions
  • Privileged – not debatable
  • Incidental –most are not debatable
  • Subsidiary – can be debatable or not
privileged motions
Privileged motions
  • Privileged motion - is a motion in parliamentary procedure that is granted precedence over ordinary business because it concerns matters of great importance or urgency.
  • Not debatable
  • For example : Call for the orders of the day, raise a question of privilege, recess, adjourn, fix the time which to adjourn
incidental motions
Incidental motions
  • a category of motions that relate in varying ways to the main motion and other parliamentary motions.
  • Most incidental motions are undebatable
  • Examples : Point of order, appeal, Suspend the rules, division of the question
subsidiary motions
Subsidiary motions
  • type of motion by which a deliberative assembly deals directly with a main motion prior to (or instead of) voting on the main motion itself.
  • Postpone indefinitly, amend, commit or refer, postpone to a certain time, limit or extend limits of debate, previous question, lay on the table
  • Can be debatable or not debatable.
main motion
Main Motion
  • Presents a new idea or item of business
  • Only one can be on the floor or before the group at the same time.
  • It is debatable, amendable, requires a second and majority vote
steps to making a main motion
Steps to making a main motion
  • Address presiding officer
  • Receive recognition to speak
  • State motion - “I move to” or “I move that”
  • Another member seconds the motion
  • Motion is discussed
  • Vote on motion
  • Chair announces results of vote
previous question
Previous question
  • Used to stop debate and vote
  • Wording “I move to previous question”
  • Second required
  • Not debatable and not amendable
  • Can be reconsidered before vote
  • 2/3rd vote required
voting
Voting
  • Majority – more than half the votes

minority is less than half the votes

  • 2/3 the majority

Four methods of voting

  • Voice vote
  • Visual vote (standing or raising hand)
  • Roll call
  • Ballot
  • General Consent
a mendment
Amendment
  • Amend is to change a motion by striking out or adding words.
  • It is debatable, amendable, requires a second and a majority vote.

Division of the House

  • To get a counted vote when voice vote is hard to determine
  • It is not debatable or amendable
  • Member seeking a division does not have to be recognized by the chair to speak.

You say “Division”.

refer to a committee
Refer to a committee

Places the motion in a committee or small group

  • The motion is debatable, amendable, requires a second and a majority vote.
  • Motion should include the number on the committee, how they are appointed, their powers, duties and when to report back.
  • Powers may be to report, to report

with recommendations,

or to act on behalf of the chapter.

tabling a motion
Tabling a motion
  • To postpone a motion to the next meeting, in order to move on to the next item of busines
  • Motion must be taken from the table at the next meeting to be discussed
  • Wording: “I move to lay this motion on the table”
  • Requires second and majority vote
  • Not debatable and not amendable
other motions
Other motions
  • Point of Order – used to correct a parliamentary mistake.
    • Is not debatable, not amendable, does not require a second or a vote.
    • Member says “I rise to a point of order”
  • Appeal – used to appeal the chair’s decision after a point of order has been made.
    • It is debatable, not amendable, requires a second and a majority vote
    • Changes a decision made by the chair
    • Wording : “ I appeal the decision of the chair”
other motions continued
Other motions continued
  • Suspend the rules – motion used to temporarily suspend the rules of an organization
    • Not debatable or amendable
    • Requires a second and 2/3 majority vote
    • Adjourn - close the meeting (simple majority vote)
    • Not debatable or amendable, requires a second and majority vote.
    • A motion to adjourn takes precedence over all other motions.