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Lesson 9: Fallacies SOCI 108 - Thinking Critically about Social Issues Spring 2012

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Lesson 9: Fallacies SOCI 108 - Thinking Critically about Social Issues Spring 2012. Learning Outcomes. Define Fallacy Identify common fallacies. What a Fallacy. A fallacy is a mistake in reasoning A fallacious argument is one that contains a mistake in reasoning

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Lesson 9: Fallacies

SOCI 108 - Thinking Critically about Social IssuesSpring 2012

learning outcomes
Learning Outcomes
  • Define Fallacy
  • Identify common fallacies
what a fallacy
What a Fallacy
  • A fallacy is a mistake in reasoning
  • A fallacious argument is one that contains a mistake in reasoning
  • If an argument exhibits a fallacy, it is probably a bad argument, but not always
fallacies of relevance
Fallacies of Relevance
  • The statements are not relevant to the conclusion.
    • What’s that got to do with the price of tea in China?
fallacies of insufficient evidence
Fallacies of Insufficient Evidence
  • The statements don’t provide enough evidence
  • The statements don’t provide the right kind of evidence, not weighty enough
    • My brother said versus an expert said
  • Consider the source
    • Dr. Phil’s diet
  • Do you question the source’s observations/is the source generally reliable?
    • Enquirer vs The New York Times
  • Did the person making the argument understand and cite the original source correctly?
  • Is there a conflict with other experts?
    • Smoking pot
fallacies of ambiguity
Fallacies of Ambiguity
  • Ambiguous language or poor grammatical structure so you can’t follow
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