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Conference on meat inspection. Animal health and welfare monitoring as integrated part of meat inspection. A lberto Laddomada H ead o f U nit SANCO D1 Animal Health and Standing Committees. Prevention is better than cure. Better biosecurity in holdings

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Animal health and welfare monitoring as integrated part of meat inspection


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    1. Conference on meat inspection Animal health and welfare monitoring as integrated part of meat inspection Alberto Laddomada Head of Unit SANCO D1 Animal Health and Standing Committees

    2. Prevention is better than cure • Better biosecurity in holdings • Surveillance (active and passive): • In holdings • Before and during transport • At place of destination (slaughterhouse!) • Any other place and/or source

    3. Evolution of surveillance in EU • Originally: limited EU provisions on surveillance (focus on trade and fight against diseases) • From mid-90’s: more detailed compulsory surveillance (BSE, zoonoses, avian influenza, bluetongue, etc.) • In future: a comprehensive, risk-based surveillance system • Modern approach: how to do best?

    4. Importance of meat inspection for animal health • Ante and post mortem inspection are cornerstones for animal disease surveillance • Slaughterhouse is a focal pointwhere animal diseases can be detected • Confirms and supplements data from other sources • Beyond decision on meat: a public good function

    5. Example 1: Meat inspection and Tuberculosis(TB) detection • Purpose: Granting free status of herds, regions, MSs rely on surveillance in abattoir to identify TB lesions • Legislation: • Annex A.I. of Directive 64/432/EEC on intra-EU trade of bovine animals, on granting status • OIE Code chapter on TB

    6. TB inspection contd. • Rationale • TB is an asymptomatic disease in cattle and a serious zoonosis • Diagnostic tests in farm lack sensitivity (~ 70-75%) • Anergic reactors go undetected at the tuberculin test • Raw milk from infected animals is a threat for public health unless coming from free herds or is heat treated • Science: • EFSA opinion on palpation/visual inspection in calves recommends keeping the most stringent procedures for TB inspection and slaughterhouse is the best place for detection

    7. Example 2: foot and mouth disease (FMD) in UK in 2001 • Ante-mortem inspection in South-East England on pigs from North-East England • By a person who never saw FMD • Decisive elements: • Professional qualification as a vet • Curriculum of study including „exotic” diseases • Personal quality and awareness • (maintanence of corporate memory about now exotic diseases)

    8. FMD contd. • Emergency situation in all UK • Limiting damages: • Speed of detection: role of highly trained individuals at key places • Speed of confirmation • Immediate handling of situation: • In the slaughterhouse

    9. Importance of the meat inspection in international trade • EU export toward third countries • Import of products of animal origin from third countries into the EU • The respect of international standards in meat inspection: • facilitates international trade • grants the health requirements are respected

    10. O.I.E. Terrestrial Animal Health Code, Chapter 1.4. Animal health surveillance Article 1.4.5. Structured non-random surveillance • D) Ante-mortem and post-mortem inspections Inspections of animals at slaughterhouses provide valuable surveillance data. The sensitivity and specificity of slaughterhouse inspection for detecting the presence of specified diseases under the inspection system in place should be pre-determined.

    11. O.I.E. Code, Chapter 6.2. Control of biological hazards of animal health and public health importance through ante- and post-mortem meat inspection • Inspection of animals at slaughter can provide a valuable contribution to surveillance for certain diseases of animal and public health importance. Control and/or reduction of biological hazards of animal and public health importance by ante- and post-mortem meat inspection are a core responsibility of Veterinary Services.

    12. Import: since 1972 Article 17 of 72/462/EEC • 1. The Member States shall not authorize importation of fresh meatin the form of carcases, including half-carcases in the case of swine,and halves or quarters in the case of bovine animals and solipeds,unless it it possible to reconstruct the entire carcase of each animal. • 2. Such importation shall be subject to the following conditions: thefresh meat must • (a) have been obtained in a slaughterhouse included on the list establishedinaccordance with Article 4 (1); • (b) come from a slaughter animal inspected ante mortem by an officialveterinarian in accordance with Annex 1, Chapter VI,of Directive 64/433/EEC and passed fit, as a result of such inspectionforslaughter for the purposes of export to the Community.

    13. Import now • Similar provisions in current import certificates (e.g. Reg (EC) 206/2010) • Ante mortem inspection „shown no evidence of diseases…”

    14. Animal Health conclusions • Prevention is better than cure • Ramifications for imports • Professional qualifications are key • Meat inspection as part of a system • Cost-benefit must be considered

    15. New EU legislation on the protection of animals at the time of killing • Council Regulation 1099/2009 on the protection of animals at the time of killing (OJ L 303,18.11.2009, p. 1) • Entry into application 1 Jan 2013

    16. In line with the hygiene package • Operators to take ownership of animal welfare • Standard Operating Procedures • Monitoring the effect of stunning on animals • Determining key paramaters of stunning

    17. Towards better knowledge • Competence of staff • General obligation • Certificate of competence • For staff in slaughterhouses • For fur farmers • Stunning and restraining equipments • Instruction of use and maintenance • Method for monitoring stunning efficiency on animals

    18. More flexibility • List of approved stunning/killing methods • More precise definition and requirements • Possibly updated through comitology

    19. An integrated approach (1) • Standards on construction, layout and equipment integrated in the approval process • Animal Welfare Officer • Monitoring procedure for stunning with animal based indicators

    20. An integrated approach (2) • New approach in line with the Hygiene Package • Flexible on the means • Prescriptive on the method • Policy focused on developing learning mechanisms • Certificate of competence and scientific support

    21. Conclusions • My title was: animal health and welfare monitoring as integrated part of meat inspection • In reality it could also have been: meat inspection as integrated part of animal health and welfare monitoring and surveillance