Instrument Accommodation on the Pioneer Venus and Galileo Probes - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Instrument Accommodation on the Pioneer Venus and Galileo Probes

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  1. Instrument Accommodation on the Pioneer Venus and Galileo Probes Bernie Bienstock Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology 24 June 2008 IPPW-6

  2. General Instrumentation Accommodation Requirements (1) • Most instruments require “normal” housekeeping support from probe subsystems • Power • Thermal control • Telemetry and command functions • Entry probes, with in-situ instrumentation, require additional support that may include some or all of the following services • Field-of-view through windows • Atmospheric ingestion and expulsion • Dynamic / static mounting requirements • Deployments • Magnetic cleanliness • Outgassing and contamination control • EMI/EMC analysis • Microphonics IPPW-6

  3. General Instrumentation Accommodation Requirements (2) • Instrument accommodation complexity is driven by probe design philosophy • Pressurized probes, such as the Pioneer Venus Large and Small Probes, require the probe pressure vessel itself to provide the viewing and sampling access for the instruments • A “vented” probe, such as the Galileo probe, allows instruments to incorporate external atmospheric sampling and viewing within the instrument • With any entry probe design, instrument accommodation requires a continuing, design coordination between the probe science PI(s) and the probe engineers IPPW-6

  4. Pioneer Venus Large Probe Design • Pressure Vessel • 79 cm diameter • Aeroshell • 142 cm diameter • 45º blunt cone Aft Cover Pressure Vessel Module Heat Shield / Aeroshell Module IPPW-6

  5. Pioneer Venus Small Probe Design Net Flux Radiometer Sensor Atmospheric Structures Instrument Sensors • Pressure Vessel • 47 cm diameter • Aeroshell • 76 cm diameter • 45º blunt cone Nephelometer Windows Pressure Vessel Module Heat Shield / Aeroshell Module IPPW-6

  6. Pioneer Venus Large Probe Instruments LN LCPS LCPS L G C LIR LSFR LNMS Shelves 65 cm diameter Descent LIR LSFR LGC • LAS Atmospheric structures • LN Nephelometer • LCPS Cloud particle size spectrometer • LIR Infrared radiometer • LNMS Neutral mass spectrometer • LGC Gas chromatograph • LSFR Solar flux radiometer LSFR Sensor LNMS LAS Electronics IPPW-6

  7. Pioneer Venus Small Probe Instruments Descent SN SN SAS Shelves 39 cm diameter SAS SNFR • SAS Atmospheric structures • SN Nephelometer • SNFR Net flux radiometer SNFR IPPW-6

  8. Pioneer Venus Window Summary IPPW-6

  9. Large Probe LSFR Window ELECTRON BEAM WELD AND GOLD PLATE BRAZE ELECTRON BEAM WELD IPPW-6

  10. Large Probe LIR Window ELECTRON BEAM WELD AND PLATE BRAZE INSTALL TEMP SENSOR WINDOW ASSY SHEAR PIN (2 PL) TITANIUM FASTNER (8 PL) GRAFOIL GASKET TITANIUM PRESSURE VESSEL IPPW-6

  11. Large Probe Pressure Inlet IPPW-6

  12. Galileo Probe Major Elements • Descent Module • 66 cm diameter • Aeroshell • 126 cm diameter • 45º blunt cone IPPW-6

  13. Galileo Probe Instruments LRD Electronics ASI Electronics LRD Sensor NMS NEP Electronics ASI Electronics NEP Sensor NMS NFR LRD Electronics HAD Electronics HAD Electronics HAD Interferometer NMS HAD Inlet HAD Interferometer • ASI Atmospheric structures inst • NEP Nephelometer • HAD Helium abundance detector • NFR Net flux radiometer • NMS Neutral mass spectrometer • LRD Lightning and radio emission detector • EPI Energetic particle instrument IPPW-6

  14. Conclusions • Probe instrument accommodation requires a close working relationship between the PI(s), instrument designers and probe engineering team • Early definition of mechanical interfaces is critical • Key considerations are instrument accommodation and integration • Extremely limited probe resources drive innovative solutions to resolve tough problems • Future probe mission success must leverage lessons learned from past missions IPPW-6