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Chapter 16

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  1. Chapter 16 Juvenile Justice

  2. History and Overview of Juvenile Courts • Mid 19th Century: reformers argued that failure of the family was the cause of delinquent behavior. • Parents failed to teach their children proper values and respect for authority. • This led to a separate court system • Parenspatriae: “parent of the country” • Idea that the court would act as the parent

  3. History and Overview of Juvenile Courts • Today’s juvenile courts: • Delinquent offenders: youths who have committed acts that would be crimes if committed by adults • Status offenders: crimes would not be if committed by adults • Running away from home, skipping school, violating curfew, etc. • Neglected or abused children: need protection from a parent or guardian.

  4. Some people believe parents should be held responsible for crimes committed by their children • Parental responsibility laws • Contributing to the delinquency of a minor: the act of an adult to aid or contribute to an illegal act by a minor

  5. Who is a Juvenile? • In most states, 18 is when you are no longer considered a juvenile • However, serious crimes can get you tried as an adult.

  6. Status Offenses • Charged with • “beyond control” • Habitually disobedient” • Truant from school

  7. Juvenile Justice Today Complete Problem 16.5 on page 194

  8. Procedures in Juvenile Court • Taking Into Custody • Can be taken into custody for a status offense • Released or detained • Intake: the informal process by which court officials or social workers decide if a juvenile should go to court. • SEE PAGE 197

  9. Procedures ctd. • Initial or Detention Hearing • Initial hearing: state must prove two things- than an offense was committed and there is reason to believe the teen committed it. • Adjudicatory Hearing • Purpose: to determine the facts of the case • Closed to the public • Dispositional Hearing • Judge decides the sentence