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  1. Modern Geometry in Ancient Hawaiian Architecture Mrs. Place Intro Basic Geometry Class Kekoa High School Spring 2011

  2. Project Objectives • Learn about ancient Hawaiian architecture • Utilize digital tools to consult on and showcase final project • Apply Geometric terminology toward a basic structure still used today – a lava rock wall • Compare modern and ancient rock wall structures • Visit a ancient Hawaiian Heiau

  3. Tool Box Geometric Tools Digital Tools Ready to Build Trip Details References

  4. Geometry Tools Everything from a basketball to the trunks of the tallest trees has a surface area. Depending on the shape a objects surface area is easy to find. It is the total area of all faces of a figure. The formula for area is dependent on what type of shape is being measured but is best defined as length times width when dealing with a 2 dimensional square. Here are 2 examples. Sphere Surface Area= 4*pi*radius^2 The radius is 12 cm. S.A.=4*3.14*12^2 = 1808.64 cm Cylinder Surface Area=2*pi*radius* (height+radius) The radius is 24cm the height is 80cm. S.A.=2*3.14*24*104 =15674.88 cm

  5. Surface Area of a Wall Now let’s find the total surface area of this wall: Length(l)=7920 feet Height(h)=7 feet Width(w)=4.5 feet h w l S.A.=2lw+2lh+2wh Answer=182223 feet Figure 1

  6. Surface Area Without lwh Task 1: On your construct a diagram of a rock wall and explain how you would find the surface area without the length, width, and height dimensions. Use any shape you like for your “rocks”. WIKI Figure 2

  7. Useful Terms • Similar Figures: Figures that have the same shape. They may be different sizes or angled differently. • Rotation: When a figure is turned. It’s rotation in terms of degrees is how it is measured. • Reflection: Figures that have been flipped along a line, vertical or horizontal. TASK 2: Describe on your how these terms can be useful in constructing a lava rock wall, especially in rock placement. WIKI

  8. Digital Tools We will be using internet based software to consult and showcase our final presentations. Classmates can post comments and suggestions as project work progresses. There will be scheduled days for in-class project work but it is crucial to work outside of class. If you do not have access to a internet connected computer please see me. Here are some web/digital tools we will be using. You will also use a digital camera. Click on each link to use its Tutorial. WIKI FLICKR BLOGGER

  9. Digital Tasks Task 3: Create a wiki in Wikispaces Task 4: Join the class wiki called Ed314wiki1 and invite me, splace12 and other classmates to become members of your wiki. Task 5: Create a blog in Blogger. Find another classmates blog and post a comment or question on a part of the project. Task 6: Join Flickr!Upload pictures from class trip and using a digital camera photograph modern rock walls and comment on their characteristics. Also comment on a classmates pictures.

  10. Let’s Build a Wall • Review this description on how to build a modern lava rock wall: Click here Task 7: On your wiki give a description of how ancient Hawaiian people used to construct lava rock walls also note how they got the rocks to the location. Don’t forget our class trip to Pu’ukoholaHeiau National Historic Site. Reminder: Trip Details

  11. Examples of Hawaiian Lava Rock Walls City of Refuge: Pu’uhonua o Honaunau, rock wall shown here is the boundaries. Anyone within the wall was granted refuge and protected from anyone outside the wall. Figure 3 Fish ponds located in low lying reef flats provided the Hawaiian people with a steady supply of fish. The rock wall allowed for water and other nutrients to come in but kept the fish contained. Figure 4

  12. Trip Details • PuukoholaHeiau National Historic Site Webpage • View some of my pictures at my Flickr! Page to refresh your memory. Also take a look at my galleries for extra inspiration • Task 8: Comment on 2 or more pictures. Share your most and least favorite part of the trip and why.

  13. Image References • Figure 1. Lava Rock Wall, Pu’ukoholaHeiau National Historic Site, Hawaii. (2011). Note: From “Rock Wall Formation”, by Summer Place, 2011, Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/rockwallsrus. Made available under Creative Commons License. • Figure 2. Unconstructed Wall, Pu’ukoholaHeiau National Historic Site, Hawaii. (2011). Note: From “Modern Rock Wall Under Construction”, by Summer Place, 2011, Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/rockwallsrus/. Made available under Creative Commons License. • Figure 3. Ancient Rock Wall Boundary, Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park, Hawaii (2010). Note: From “Wall Around Pu’uhonua o Honaunau NHP”, by Rajiv Patel, 2010, Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/23679420@N00/5209776256/. Made available under Creative Commons License. • Figure 4. Fish ponds, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii (2005). Note: From “Aquaculture”, by Steve Jurvetson, 2005, Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/jurveston/74273460/. Made available under Creative Commons License.