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Building A Movement: Closing Achievement and Opportunity Gaps in California. What, Why, and How?. Claremont Graduate University Phyllis Hart The Education Trust-West. The Gap Between California’s Young People and Their Peers in across the nation.

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Building A Movement: Closing Achievement and Opportunity Gaps in California. What, Why, and How?


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    1. Building A Movement: Closing Achievement and Opportunity Gaps in California. What, Why, and How? Claremont Graduate University Phyllis Hart The Education Trust-West

    2. The Gap Between California’s Young People and Their Peers in across the nation.

    3. California’s NAEP Scores for 4th Grade Reading Lag Behind Other States Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

    4. Latino 4th Grade Students – NAEP READING Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

    5. African American 4th Grade Students – NAEP READING Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

    6. California’s NAEP Scores for 8th Grade Reading Lag Behind Most States Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

    7. Latino 8th Grade Students – NAEP READING Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

    8. African American 8th Grade Students – NAEP READING Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

    9. And Let’s Be Clear. It’s Not Our Demographics.

    10. California’s White 8th Grade Students Trail Behind Their Peers in Most States Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

    11. California’s Asian 8th Grade Students Also Lag Behind Many States Source: National Center for Education Statistics, http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

    12. On Our Own Assessments?

    13. English Language Arts CST 2007 All Students Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    14. MATH CST 2007All Students *General Math – Tests Grades 6 & 7 Standards Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    15. But underneath those averages. . .

    16. ELA 4th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    17. ELA 4th Grade, By Economic StatusCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    18. Math 4th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    19. Math 4th Grade, By Economic StatusCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    20. These gaps begin before children arrive at the schoolhouse door. But, rather than organizing our educational system to ameliorate this problem, we organize it to exacerbate the problem.

    21. But by Middle and High School Gaps Grow Increasingly Wider. In both Reading and Math. By the end of high school, even for those students that stay in our school, the gaps are staggering.

    22. CA: African American and Latino 7th graders read at about the level of White 3rd graders CAT/6 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    23. Low-Income 7th graders read at about the level of Non Low-Income 3rd graders CAT/6 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    24. ELA 8th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    25. ELA 8th Grade, By Economic StatusCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    26. Math 8th Grade (General Math) By Ethnicity CST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    27. Math 8th Grade (General Math)By Economic Status, CST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    28. ELA 11th Grade, By EthnicityCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    29. ELA 11th Grade, By Economic StatusCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    30. Algebra I (Grades 8-11), By EthnicityCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    31. Algebra I (Grades 8-11), By Economic Status CST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    32. Geometry (Grades 8-11), By EthnicityCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    33. Geometry (Grades 8-11)CST 2007, By Economic Status Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    34. Algebra II (Grades 8-11), By EthnicityCST 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    35. Algebra II (Grades 8-11)CST 2007, By Economic Status Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    36. CAHSEE First Time Test-Takers (Class of 2007as10th graders)ELA Pass Rates Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    37. CAHSEE First Time Test-Takers (Class of 2007 as 10th Graders) Math Pass Rates Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    38. …at the end of their senior year, CAHSEE Class of 2007 Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    39. And these are for the students that are left. Drop Out Rates Staggering, Even if Unclear. We lose most kids between 9th and 10th grades.

    40. Too Few Graduate.CaliforniaClass of 2005 *Includes 9th graders who graduated four years later. Source: Education Trust-West Analysis of CDE data, using the Manhattan Institute methodology.

    41. The Gaps Don’t End At High School.

    42. Graduation Rates at CSU SchoolsLatino vs. White Source: CollegeResults.org (www.edtrust.org)

    43. Graduation Rates at CSU SchoolsAfrican-American vs. White Source: CollegeResults.org (www.edtrust.org)

    44. Graduation Rates at UC SchoolsAfrican American vs. White Source: CollegeResults.org (www.edtrust.org)

    45. Graduation Rates at UC SchoolsLatino vs. White

    46. How? By giving students who arrive with less, less in school, too.

    47. When we focus on changing those patterns, we get results.

    48. Sustainable Improvement is Possible.A Model: Ralph Bunche Elementary - Compton Unified • 48% African-American • 50% Latino • 93% Low-income • Outperforming District and State 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade Math Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    49. 64% 51% 27% Source: California Department of Education, 2007

    50. 76% 56% 38% Source: California Department of Education, 2007