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Jesse Markow Manager-Communication and Business Development WIDA Consortium. Introduction to the WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards. Overview of the Presentation. Overview of Language Acquisition: Myths and Misconceptions

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jesse markow manager communication and business development wida consortium

Jesse MarkowManager-Communication and Business DevelopmentWIDA Consortium

Introduction to the WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards

© 2010 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, on behalf of the WIDA Consortium www.wida.us

overview of the presentation
Overview of the Presentation
  • Overview of Language Acquisition: Myths and Misconceptions
  • Academic Language and its Relationship to Academic Content Knowledge
  • Introduction to the structure and organization of the WIDA ELP Standards
  • Key to Implementation of WIDA ELP Standards: Transformations
  • Using the WIDA ELP Standards to differentiate language
  • Adapting lessons
slide3
Quiz
  • Do this quiz with at least one other person, but no more that two other people
  • As a team, read carefully each statement and decide if the statement is true or false
  • For each statement, justify your answer; i.e. “why do you think it is true/false?”
myths and misconceptions about language acquisition
Myths and Misconceptionsabout Language Acquisition
  • When an ELL is able to speak English fluently, he or she has mastered it
  • The more time students spend in the mainstream, the quicker they learn the language
  • Teaching academic language is only about teaching vocabulary
  • ELLs will acquire academic English faster if their parents speak English at home
  • According to research, students in ESL-only programs with no schooling in their native language take 1-2 years to reach grade level norms
myth 1
Myth #1

When an ELL is able to speak English fluently, he or she has mastered it

  • Students need to be able to LISTEN, SPEAK, READ and WRITE in English in order to be successful in school
  • Speaking social English fluently is not enough, students should also develop academic oral language
  • We must build upon what students CAN do
myth 2
Myth #2

The more time students spend in the mainstream, the quicker they learn the language

  • Students learn most efficiently when instruction is at their zone of proximal development (ZPD); classrooms with no language supports may be beyond some students ZPD
  • Pull out situations, on the other hand, do not always provide separate education that is equitable to the general education classroom
  • Collaboration between general education teachers and ESL specialists is key to effective pedagogy for ELLs
myth 3
Myth #3

Teaching academic language is only about teaching vocabulary

  • Look at the following passage and write down:
    • Important information
    • Details
    • Vocabulary needed to solve the problem
    • What else may you need to know
slide8

A train carrying 179 passengers leaves the station traveling due east at a rate of 45 miles per hour.

A second train carrying 220 passengers leaves a different station an hour later traveling due west on the same track, going 60 miles per hourIf the stations are 255 miles apart, how many miles from the halfway point between the stations will the trains collide?

myth 31
Myth #3
  • Teaching academic language is about teaching the discourse used to communicate and understand ideas and concepts
  • Academic discourse includes vocabulary, language rules and norms, linguistic complexity, pragmatics, socio cultural usage, etc.
myth 4
Myth #4

ELLs will acquire academic English faster if their parents speak English at home

  • Parents should speak to their children in their strongest language for the appropriate context in order to
    • Model appropriate use of language
    • Promote higher order thinking skills
    • Maintain quality family conversations
    • Develop bilingualism, biliteracy and bicognition
myth 5
Myth #5

According to research, students in ESL-only programs with no schooling in their native language take 1-2 years to reach grade level norms

  • The amount of time that takes ELLs to reach grade level norms depends on:
    • Instruction, practice and feedback on their use of academic language
    • Student’s prior schooling
    • Socio economic position
    • Content knowledge
    • Socio cultural factors
    • Other
debrief
Debrief
  • Language development occurs at different rates in different domains (listening, speaking, reading and writing).
  • Language development needs to be scaffolded; as educators we need tools to achieve this.
  • Academic language is more than just vocabulary; it includes the rules of language and the discourse we use to make meaning of concepts or express ideas.
  • In addition to academic language and content, educators must consider ELLs’ unique experiences, background and educational history when planning instruction and assessment.
language across the curriculum
Language Across the Curriculum

Consider the essential questions below:

  • What constitutes Academic Language Proficiency?
  • What constitutes AcademicContent Knowledge?
  • What is the relationship between Academic LanguageProficiency and Academic Content Knowledge?
more on language proficiency and content knowledge
More on Language Proficiency and Content Knowledge

How many different ways can you read the following mathematical expression?

3+2=

let s discuss this a little more
Let’s “discuss” this a little more…

You will write 5 paragraphs. Each paragraph will discuss a different topic:

  • Your best friend
let s discuss this a little more1
Let’s “discuss” this a little more…

You will write 5 paragraphs. Each paragraph will discuss a different topic:

  • Your best friend
  • Your favorite holiday
let s discuss this a little more2
Let’s “discuss” this a little more…

You will write 5 paragraphs. Each paragraph will discuss a different topic:

  • Your best friend
  • Your favorite holiday
  • The Pythagorean Theorem
let s discuss this a little more3
Let’s “discuss” this a little more…

You will write 5 paragraphs. Each paragraph will discuss a different topic:

  • Your best friend
  • Your favorite holiday
  • The Pythagorean Theorem
  • Photosynthesis
let s discuss this a little more4
Let’s “discuss” this a little more…

You will write 5 paragraphs. Each paragraph will discuss a different topic:

  • Your best friend
  • Your favorite holiday
  • The Pythagorean Theorem
  • Photosynthesis
  • The effect of World Wars I and II in the Role of Women in the job market of America
variations of language
WIDA ConsortiumVariations of Language

Language of

Social Studies

Language of

Science

Language of

Language Arts

Language of

Mathematics

General academic language for

knowing, thinking, reading, writing,

visualizing

Language of

Computer Science

Language of

Music

Foundation of home and community

language and cultural factors

Adapted from Zwiers (2008)

language and content knowledge
Language and Content Knowledge
  • Language proficiency involves the language associated with the content areas.
  • Content knowledge reflects the declarative (what) and procedural knowledge (how) associated with the content.
  • WIDA ELP standards focus on academic language; academic content standards focus on academic content.
why are english language proficiency elp standards necessary
Why are English language proficiency (ELP) standards necessary?

To facilitate ELL students’ English proficiency attainment, access to content knowledge, and ultimately, their academic success.

To provide a curriculum/assessment resource anchored in academic content standards.

To establish a common yardstick to define and measure how ELLs acquire language across the domains of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

To comply with federal law (No Child Left Behind Act of 2001) requiring ELP standards and ELP standards-based assessments.

five wida elp standards
Five WIDA ELP Standards

Standard 1- SIL: English language learners communicate for SOCIAL AND INSTRUCTIONAL purposes within the school setting.

Standard 2 – LoLA: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of LANGUAGE ARTS.

Standard 3– LoMA:English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of MATHEMATICS.

Standard 4– LoSC:English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of SCIENCE.

Standard 5 – LoSS:English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of SOCIAL STUDIES.

five grade level clusters
Five Grade-Level Clusters

The 2007 WIDA ELP Standards are organized by the following Grade-level clusters:

PreK−K

Grades 1−2

Grades 3−5

Grades 6−8

Grades 9−12

four language domains
Four Language Domains

Listening ─ process, understand, interpret, and evaluate spoken language in a variety of situations

Speaking ─ engage in oral communication in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes and audiences

Reading ─process, interpret, and evaluate written language, symbols, and text with understanding and fluency

Writing ─ engage in written communication in a variety of forms for a variety of purposes and audiences

levels of english language proficiency
Levels of English Language Proficiency

6

5

REACHING

BRIDGING

4

EXPANDING

3

DEVELOPING

2

BEGINNING

1

ENTERING

criteria for performance definitions
Criteria for Performance Definitions

Linguistic Complexity:

The amount and quality of speech or writing for a given situation

Vocabulary Usage:

The specificity of words or phrases for a given context

Language Control:

The comprehensibility of the communication based on the amount and type of errors

6

REACHING

1

2

3

4

5

ENTERING

BEGINNING

DEVELOPING

EXPANDING

BRIDGING

task analysis
Task Analysis

Look at the following tasks and decide the proficiency language level that a student should possess to engage in each of them:

___ Draw a poster describing the water cycle

___ Write a lab report for an experiment performed in class

___ Explain how a problem was solved

___ Follow directions on how to create a timeline of their life events

___ Write a persuasive essay

how can i use this new knowledge in my instruction
How can I use this new knowledge in my instruction?
  • To differentiate the language used in
    • Directions
    • Instruction
    • Processes: activities, readings
    • Products: assessments, presentations, assignments
  • To guide language instruction
    • Listening
    • Speaking
    • Reading
    • Writing
language development
Language Development

Language Proficiency

Vocabulary Usage

Linguistic Complexity

Language Control

5 Bridging

4 Expanding

3 Developing

2 Beginning

1 Entering

model performance indicators
Model Performance Indicators

Provide examples (models) of assessable language skills

Reflect the second language acquisition process

Describe how students can use the language

Provide the anchors for curriculum, instruction, and assessment

standards frameworks
Summative

Is amenable to large-scale testing or classroom assessment

Includes sensory and graphic supports

Contains model performance indicators that are observable and measurable

Formative

Corresponds to everyday classroom practice

Includes sensory, graphic, and interactive supports

Contains model performance indicators that include strategies, technology, and long-term projects

Standards Frameworks
centrality of the elp standards
Centrality of the ELP Standards

Classroom Assessments

W-APT™ACCESS for ELLs®

Ongoing Instruction & Assessment

Formative

Framework

Summative

Framework

English Language

ProficiencyStandards& PerformanceDefinitions

ModelPerformanceIndicators:Formative

ModelPerformanceIndicators:Summative

a model performance indicator
A Model Performance Indicator

Grade Level Cluster: 1-2

English Language Proficiency Standard 4: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of SCIENCE.

Domain: Speaking

the elements of the mpi
The Elements of the MPI

Model performance indicators consist of 3 elements:

  • The Language Function
  • The Content Stem or Sample Topic
  • The Support or Strategy
transformations
Transformations

The Key to your Lesson Planning and Curriculum Development

transformations1
Transformations

Changing the MPI and strand to more specifically address state or local content standards and classroom practice

pretend
Pretend…

You teach or support 2nd grade Mathematics…

this unit
This Unit

…you have been working on Benchmark MA 2.1.1 from the HI Content and Performance Standards

Represent whole numbers up to 1000 in flexible ways (e.g. relating, composing, and decomposing numbers), including the use of tens and hundreds as units

finding a strand
Finding a Strand
  • What grade level cluster should you look in?
  • What standard should you focus on?
  • The domain you choose will depend on the specific needs of your students and on your lesson plan
finding a strand1
Finding a Strand
  • What grade level cluster should you look in?

1-2

  • What standard should you focus on?

Standard 3: The language of Mathematics

  • The domain you choose will depend on the specific needs of your students and on your lesson plan

Let’s choose speaking

does the topic match yours
Does the topic match yours?

Grades 1-2

ELP Standard 3: The Language of Mathematics, Formative Framework

Domain: Speaking

transforming the language function1
Transforming the Language Function
  • Sometimes, it may be useful to transform other parts of the MPI
  • Transforming the language function can help you change the domain, for example, from speaking to writing
  • Change the language function to better match your goals and objectives
transform the supports to
Transform the supports to:
  • Match your instruction
  • Meet the needs of your students
  • Use your available resources
your transformed strand
Your transformed strand…
  • Can be used to scaffold for language development
  • A student with English language proficiency may not be able to write stories, but instead, could describe how to decompose numbers
  • And with support, this students could give examples of situations when it is useful to decompose numbers
another classroom example
Another Classroom Example
  • Ms. Vang teaches 6th grade language arts and social studies. She is about to start a unit in Ancient Greece and wants to incorporate a study of the genre of mythology in the same unit.
  • Amalia and Cheng are two students in Ms. Vang’s class who have been identified as ELLs. Amalia came to the US three years ago with her family and speaks fluent Tagalog at home. Amalia’s oral language proficiency is higher than her literacy. (Listening: 4, Speaking: 3, Reading 3, Writing 2)
  • Cheng’s parents are from Taiwan and they speak Mandarin, Taiwanese and English. His family arrived last year to the US. Cheng is fluent in Mandarin and can read and write some English. (Listening: 2, Speaking: 1, Reading: 3, Writing: 3)
using the standards to differentiate language
Using the Standards to Differentiate Language
  • How can Ms. Vang differentiate language in her instruction?

Grades 6-8

ELP Standard 1: Social and Instructional Language

using the standards to differentiate language1
Using the Standards to Differentiate Language
  • How can Ms. Vang differentiate the reading of the myths?

Grades 6-8

ELP Standard 2: Language of Language Arts

Domain: Reading

Myths

using the standards to differentiate language2
Using the Standards to Differentiate Language
  • How can Ms. Vang differentiate the writing assignment where she asks her students to explain the relationship between Ancient Greece’s religion and mythology?

ELP Standard 5: Language of Social Studies

Domain: Writing

using the standards to collaborate
Using the Standards to Collaborate
  • The WIDA ELP Standards integrate content and language.
  • Content specialists AND language specialists need to collaborate to differentiate language appropriately and to target appropriate language objectives.
  • Strong collaboration will result in continuous academic language development and access to content.
summary using the standards
Summary: Using the Standards
  • Differentiating instruction
  • Setting language goals and objectives
  • Scaffolding language development
  • Assessing students’ language performance
  • Collaborating with other educators
for more information please contact the wida help desk 1 866 276 7735 or help@wida us

Questions or Comments?

For more information, please contact the WIDA Help Desk:1-866-276-7735 or help@wida.us

© 2009 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, on behalf of the WIDA Consortium www.wida.us