academic vocabulary instruction for ells l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Academic Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Academic Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

Academic Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 175 Views
  • Uploaded on

Academic Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs . Presented by Marcia Gaudet • SFSD ELL Instructional Coach. How do we teach academic vocabulary to ELs? Let’s start with the question: How do children develop a second language?. Language theory says… Children develop a second language the same

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Academic Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs' - teva


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
academic vocabulary instruction for ells

Academic Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs

Presented by Marcia Gaudet • SFSD ELL Instructional Coach

slide2
How do we teach academic vocabulary to ELs? Let’s start with the question: How do children develop a second language?

Language theory says…

  • Children develop a second language the same

intuitive way they develop their first language, through social interaction with their caregivers through comprehensible input; in the case of

the classroom, with their teachers.

• The clear, visual methods you use are just what they need!

what is the timeframe for acquiring a second language 3 types of students
What is the timeframe for acquiring a second language? 3 types of students!
  • No prior literacy
  • Literacy in L1
  • Literacy + study of English
slide5

Sociolinguistic Development

Level 6

Advanced Fluency Abstract language more accessible May need help with college essays

Level 5

Advanced Fluency 5 – 7 years Decontextualized, abstract vocab

SD Exits ELs

Level 4 4.8 Composite

Intermediate Fluency 3 - 5 years 12,000 receptive words 4.0 Read/Write

3 - 5 years to attain

Level 3 Often quiet, don’t

Speech Emergence: 1 - 3 years 7,000 receptive words ask questions

2-3 years to attain

Level 2 1,000 receptive words

Early Production: 6 months to 1 year

Level 1

Pre-Production: 0-6 months 1-2 receptive words

Note: In America 6 year olds in English speaking homes have 10,000 to 24,000 words of English in 1st grade when learning to read.

bics calp
BICS & CALP
  • BICS - basic interpersonal communication skills (social language)
    • 1 to 2 years to acquire, context embedded
  • CALP - cognitive academic language proficiency (academic language)
    • 5 to 7 years, context reduced
  • To facilitate language learning we must re-embed lessons in context and make the language accessible and comprehensible to all our learners.
examples of bics calp
BICS…Social Language

Listening: Follows general classroom directions

Speaking: Converses easily about social situations with peers and teachers. May speak English without an accent.

Reading: may decode reading material with ease, but may not comprehend what is read.

Writing: Can fill out school forms. Can find and copy the answers to questions in textbooks.

CALP…Academic English

Listening: Can follow specific directions for academic tasks.

Speaking: Expresses reasons for opinions. Asks for clarification during academic tasks.

Reading: Reads academic materials with good comprehension.

Writing: Can write an essay supporting a point of view.

Examples of BICS & CALP
what are the implications for the classroom
What are the implications for the classroom?
  • The implications of research: the best language lessons may be those in which real communication takes place, in which an acquirer understands what the speaker is trying to say.
  • Similarly, a reading passage is appropriate for a student if he or she understands the message.
  • Finally, the teacher-talk that surrounds the exercises may be far more valuable then the exercise itself.
  • We teach language best when we use it for what it was designed for: communication. -Stephen D Krashen
how we serve ells in the sfsd
How we serve ELLs in the SFSD

Level 4,5, & 6 ELL

Regular Content & Classrooms

Level 2 & 3 ELL

Regular Classrooms & Content

Level 1 ELL

Immersion

Centers

Elem – Pull-out/Push-in

MS,HS - Sheltered

SFSD Serving 1800+ ELLs

270 Level 1 Immersion Programs

1300 + 2s & 3s

S.I.O.P.

training

is coming!

nurture ways we are less like people

Nurture

Individual

Unique

Experiences,

Insights, reflections

ACCULTURATION

The adaptation to a new

Culture: language, etc.

ENCULTURATION

How we learn to interpret the world-culture of caregivers:

language, beliefs, tastes, humor, behavior, etc.

THE BASICS OF BEING HUMAN

Things all are born with: Sensory abilities, linguistic wiring, genetic &

biological heritage, innate abilities, etc.

Nurture Ways we are less like people

Ways we are less like people.

Ways we are more like people.

Nature

acculturation the process of adaptation and integration into a new cultural environment collier
Acculturation - the process of adaptation and integration into a new cultural environment (Collier).

OR – the chaos of moving…

between cultures!

Home culture….School culture

3rd Culture Kids!

slide13

Lasts about 1 year

Unpacking

your mind

The better you

leave the better

you enter.

Transition

Entering

Leaving

Chaos

Unsettling

Statuslesness

Anxiety

Resettling

Preparation

Celebration

Denial

Observation

Introduction

Vulnerability

Engagement

Re-Engagement

Settled

Settled

Commitment

Status

Intimacy

Commitment

Status

Intimacy

The Transition Experience

slide14

Everyone goes through acculturation when they move – whether it is someone moving from the US to another country or from another country to the US!

slide15

Cycle of Culture Shock

Fascination

  • Finds the new interesting and exciting.
  • Listens to the new sounds, intonations, and rhythms of the new language.
  • Tries doing/saying things in the new culture/language that are interesting.
  • Tries out new activities, words and attitudes with a lot of enthusiasm.

Adjustment/Recovery

  • Basic needs met & routine established
  • Improvement in transition language skills
  • More positive experiences with new culture.
  • May experience stress in ‘home’ culture.

Disenchantment

  • Encounters Problems.

-At First: Basic Needs.

-Later: More Complex problems.

  • Misunderstandings Related to language, customs, mannerisms occur.

Mental Isolation

  • Misses ‘home’ culture.
  • Feels like outsider in new.
  • May limit or avoid all contact with new culture.
  • Spends more or all of one’s time with own cultural group.
cognition culture
Cognition & Culture

Culture

The concept of things that particular people use as models of perceiving, relating, and interpreting their environment.

The process by which individuals perceive, relate to, and interpret their environment.

Therefore: Any effort to assess or provide

intervention with cognitive development

must be done within the cultural context.

Cognition

acculturation the process of adaptation and integration into a new cultural environment collier17
Acculturation - the process of adaptation and integration into a new cultural environment (Collier).
  • ELL students go through many phases of development as they are with us…
  • Looking at these phases and the reasons for them can

help us to better understand & accommodate for the needs

created by these factors.

  • Take a minute and share with a partner, an

experience you have personally had as a new person in a

new culture: a new food you have tried, a lesson learned

the hard way, a wrong assumption you made, etc.

common side effects of acculturation process
Common Side Effects of Acculturation Process
  • Heightened Anxiety
  • Confusion in Locus of Control
  • Withdrawal
  • Silence/unresponsiveness
  • Response Fatigue
  • Code-switching
  • Distractibility
  • Resistance to Change
  • Disorientation
  • Stress Related Behaviors
acculturation can also be referred to as culture shock
Acculturation can also be referred to as Culture Shock
  • These are NORMAL side effects of acculturation NOT indications of disabilities.
  • The appropriate intervention for these is to ‘treat’ the impact of culture shock, which is not a disability.
terms you will hear

Terms you will hear…

ELL - English Language Learner

LEP - Limited English Proficiency

ESL - English as a second language

ENL - English as a new language

TESOL - Teachers of English to speakers of other languages

who are ells
Who are ELLs?
  • Who are ELL students in South Dakota?
    • Refugee students - placed through the UN

& Secondary refugee students (no financial help)

    • Students who are immigrating on other types of visas: Ethiopia - Diversity visa, Mexico, etc.
    • Students born in the USA whose home language is other than English
    • International students who have been adopted!
    • Students who are children of visiting professionals and higher ed students (studying at Augustana, etc.)
where do ells come from
Where do ELLs come from?
  • In the SFSD there are over 50 language groups
  • There is no Me without You - by Melissa Greene - Crisis in Ethiopia
  • At the Immersion Center we are now seeing students from:
      • Iraq, Yemen (Arabic)
      • Somalia,Kenya,Tanzania,Congo,Ethiopia, Burundi
      • Burma, Thailand
      • Mexico, Guatemala
what do i need to know to be effective with ells
What do I need to know to be effective with ELLs?
  • 1. If you speak English, you have what they need!

• Speak clearly, not too fast, explain idioms

  • 2.Hands on learning, visuals, props, etc.

• Marzano’s Nonlinguistic Representation, context embedded

  • 3. Remember 90%+ of communication with

ELL’s is nonverbal - they see & feel everything!

• They need to feel safe and that they belong in order for their

brains to learn.

nonlinguistic representation key ideas
Nonlinguistic RepresentationKey Ideas
  • Words alone cannot convey meaning to ELLs.
  • Nonlinguistic representation help ELLs.
  • Nonlinguistic representations include real objects, pictures, pictorgraphs, diagrams, physical models, video clips, recorded sounds, gestures, and movement.
  • Seeing is remembering.
maisha ya kipepeo
Maisha ya kipepeo
  • Demale anajaalia ya wazima kwamba alikuwa yai mbolea na wa kiume.
  • Hatches ya yai katika vidogo larba.
  • Ya larva anakula na kukua kiasi kubwa. The larva inaona yenyewe na aina twig na nje ngumu shell.
  • A kikamilifu-grown wazima kipepeo anaibuka kutoka chrysalis.
  •  Wazima kuishi kwa muda mfupi tu. Wao hawawezi kula; wao kunywa tu kupitia stra yao kama cirkel proboscis. Watakuwa kuruka, mate, na kuzaliana.
slide26

Kipepeo Lifecycle

Metamorphosis ya Butterfly ya Rouanez

wote yai

yai

Yai hatches katika larva vidogo (kiwavi)

kiwavi ya kula na kukua kiasi kubwa

Watu wazima wa kike aliandika kwamba alikuwa yai fertilzed na wa kiume

kiwavi ya kujishikiza jani la na aina ngumu nje shell

Kijani Pupa

A butterfly kikamilifu mzima anaibuka kutoka chrystalis ya

Ndani ya Chrysalis mabadiliko ya kiwavi katika kipepeo

Watu wazima kuishi kwa muda mfupi tu

marzano s 6 steps for effective vocabulary instruction
Marzano’s 6 Steps for Effective Vocabulary Instruction:
  • 1. The teacher provides a description, explanation, or example of the new term. Research shows that just giving students a definition does not “appear to be a useful instructional tool, particularly in the initial stages of learning a new word.” Therefore, the teacher uses conversational descriptions, explanations, and examples when talking about the word with students.

Question: What does this look like with ELL students? • Talk with an elbow partner

marzano s 6 steps for effective vocabulary instruction29
Marzano’s 6 Steps for Effective Vocabulary Instruction:
  • 2.  Students restate the explanation of the new term in their own words.
    • After the discussion that takes place in Step 1, students restate in their own words what the teacher has presented about the new vocabulary word.
  • Question: What does this look like with ELL students? • Talk with an elbow partner
marzano s 6 steps for effective vocabulary instruction30
Marzano’s 6 Steps for Effective Vocabulary Instruction:
  • 3. Students create a nonlinguistic representation of the term.

• These representations can be in the form of graphic organizers, pictures, or pictographs.

marzano s 6 steps for effective vocabulary instruction31
Marzano’s 6 Steps for Effective Vocabulary Instruction:
  • 4. Students periodically do activities that help them add to their knowledge of vocabulary terms.

•These activities should allow students to interact with vocabulary terms in a variety of ways: comparing terms, classifying terms, generating metaphors using terms, generating analogies using terms, revising initial descriptions of nonlinguistic representations of terms and using understanding of roots and affixes to deepen knowledge of terms.

marzano s 6 steps for effective vocabulary instruction32
Marzano’s 6 Steps for Effective Vocabulary Instruction:
  • 5. Periodically students are asked to discuss the terms with one another.

• Students should occasionally discuss their vocabulary terms in small groups.

marzano s 6 steps for effective vocabulary instruction33
Marzano’s 6 Steps for Effective Vocabulary Instruction:
  • 6. Periodically students are involved in games that allow them to play with the terms.

• There are lots of vocabulary games that kids can play to help build connections between terms.

Talk with a partner – What kinds of games have you used for this purpose? Smart Board Activities? Share with us!

marzano s 6 steps for effective vocabulary instruction34
Marzano’s 6 Steps for Effective Vocabulary Instruction:
  • 1. The teacher provides a description, explanation, or example of the new term.
  • 2. Students restate the explanation of the new term in their own words.
  • 3. Students create a nonlinguistic representation of the term.
  • 4. Students periodically do activities that help them add to their knowledge of vocabulary terms.
  • 5. Periodically students are asked to discuss the terms with one another.
  • 6. Periodically students are involved in games that allow them to play with the terms.
additional resources can be found
Additional Resources can be found…
  • On the WIDA Website

• Can Do Descriptors for language levels

  • on the SFSD Website: (2 places)

1. • Document Library – ELL Handbook

2. • Click on: Staff

          • Instructional Resources Wikki,
          • ELL
          • Cultural links, ELL Working File info, Collier, etc!