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Making the Transition from Trainee to Trainer. Dan Brower Branch Manager Parkville Branch Mid-Continent Public Library. Jennifer Peters Content Management and Discovery Services Librarian Rockhurst University. Introduction. “Other duties as assigned” in job descriptions

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Making the Transition from Trainee to Trainer


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    1. Making the Transition from Trainee to Trainer Dan Brower Branch Manager Parkville Branch Mid-Continent Public Library Jennifer Peters Content Management and Discovery Services Librarian Rockhurst University

    2. Introduction • “Other duties as assigned” in job descriptions • Often times, those “other duties” involve training. Whether formal or informal, training has become a large and important part of the library world. Sometimes new staff members are hired and have to train other staff right away! • If you have answered a question at the workplace, you have already helped teach someone something.

    3. Goals • Anyone and everyone can be a trainer • Give them the tools and guidance.  Maximize their sense of discovery and participation. • Empower them to keep searching for answers and explore in their own way. Ask for help and be prepared to share knowledge with others.

    4. What training looks like:

    5. What training is actually like:

    6. Theory Behind it all Source: Alaska Statewide Mentor Project:Mentoring Model: NTC Formative Assessment System http://www.alaskamentorproject.org/mentoring_fas.php

    7. More Theory:

    8. What kind of assessment: before learning during learning after learning

    9. What training actually is like:

    10. Learn it • Break it down • Teach it • Follow up • Learned! • Questions?

    11. Learn it • If you don’t know it, you can’t teach it. • Make sure that you understand the database/topic on which you are training • A great way to learn something for training is by breaking it down

    12. Learn it • Break it down • Why do they need to learn this? • What are the important concepts? • What is unique about the subject? • Out of 15 history databases, what makes Facts on File stand out? • What are the differences between Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer? • How does the interface work? (if technology)

    13. Learn it • Break it down • Teach it • Methods • One-on-one vs. Group Training • Hands-on vs. Presentation • Different people learn different ways

    14. Learn it • Break it down • Teach it • Methods http://www.crito.uci.edu/papers/2005/DanzigerDunkle.pdf

    15. Teach it • Learn it • Break it down • Teach it • Tools • Handouts • Avoid paragraphs of text • Screenshots allow for trainees to discover on their own • Checklists (or not (Dan hates checklists (no, really))) • These may work for you or not • Excel spreadsheets (checklists in disguise) • Keep dates of trainings and follow-ups • Easier to manage large staff

    16. Teach it • Learn it • Break it down • Teach it • Tools • Vendor Webcasts/Tutorials/Resources • Most, if not all, libraries all have vendors(EBSCO, Gale, etc.) • They are selling their product and focus on the important aspects • Don’t reinvent the wheel • Training Manuals? • How many people read the manual? -> Throw it out! • Become outdated quickly

    17. Technology Wikis LibGuides Screen casting instructions LiveBinder

    18. Technology • Screen Casting • Great tool used by trainers • Also a great tool that can be used by trainees • After training, have the trainee record their process • Capture screen • Capture narration • Allows for greater discovery • Personalized learning • Can save time (multiple one-on-one sessions essentially)

    19. http://xkcd.com/627/

    20. Teach it • Learn it • Break it down • Teach it • Follow up • One training session is not always (and usually is not) enough for a trainee to sufficiently learn a topic. Be sure to follow-up and make sure that they grasp it. This is a great opportunity for you, as the trainer, to revisit the topic as well; you may find something that you missed previously.

    21. Teach it • Learn it • Break it down • Teach it • Follow up • Learned! • They’ve grasped the topic, program, etc. • What if the interface changes? • What if they add something? • What if they encounter something completely new? • Trainers and trainees should always be learning • They also need someone as a resource. • You • Other trainers • Peers

    22. Teach it • Learn it • Break it down • Teach it • Follow up • Learned! • Questions? • Safe place to ask questions • Peer to peer resources • Scheduled follow-ups for more questions

    23. Tips & Best Practices • Make it fun • Show examples • Simple handouts • Reference batting practice • Examples that demonstrate homeruns, strikeouts, etc. • Homerun = absolutely awesome reference encounter • Strikeout = an encounter during which staff may have felt like they failed (opportunity for more training)

    24. Tips & Best Practices • Show and Tell • Trainees show different things they learned • Different methods discussed • Let the trainee get hands-on • Broad instructions let them discover

    25. Tips & Best Practices • Basic on interface, focus on tasks • Interfaces may change • Tasks will not (i.e. a Search for something) • Relate the training to the who, what & why • Who will use it? • What is it/What is found there? • Why would someone use it? • Why do they need to know this?

    26. Tips & Best Practices • It is easier to train staff who are on the same knowledge level • Don’t be afraid to make mistakes! • Training on demand • If someone needs help with the copier and a staff member doesn’t know how to use it, take the opportunity to show the staff member and the customer/patron.

    27. Lessons Learned • Never assume that someone knows something • No two people learn the same way, so trainers may need to adapt their training • Document what/whom you have trained

    28. Training Free & Breezy Go Live! You can do it! Try it you’ll like it Just play with it Trainers: What we is

    29. Tell me and I will forget. Teach me and I will remember. Involve me and I will understand. Step back and I will act. – Chinese Proverb

    30. Resources: • Webjunction.org • The No-Nonsense Guide to Training in Libraries by Barbara Allan, Facet Publishing: 2013. • Designing Training (ACRL Active Guide #5) by Melaine Hawks, ALA: 2013.

    31. Contact Us: Jennifer Peters Content Management and Discovery Services Librarian Greenlease Library Rockhurst University jennifer.peters@rockhurst.edu Dan Brower Branch Manager – Parkville Branch Mid-Continent Public Library dbrower@mymcpl.org