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RHI Training Voucher Scheme. Acknowledgements:. The Renewable H eat I ncentive T raining S upport S cheme gratefully acknowledges the help of BEAMA and in particular the following member companies: Daikin Glen Dimplex Vaillant

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RHI Training Voucher Scheme


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    1. RHI Training Voucher Scheme

    2. Acknowledgements: The Renewable Heat Incentive Training Support Scheme gratefully acknowledges the help of BEAMA and in particular the following member companies: • Daikin • Glen Dimplex • Vaillant • The following presentation slides highlight some important changes to the MCS standards and reinforce some areas that, whilst are not new, are areas that can be easily overlooked.

    3. MIS 3005 V4.0 Objective – CPD to ensure heat pump training is being delivered to the latest version of MIS3005 4.2 – Design and Installation • The following principles shall be met when designing, specifying and installing heat pump systems • Trainers should be able explain the design calculation method used in Appendix E and complete the MCS Heat Pump Compliance Certificate, taking particular note of the guidance notes • Manufacturers tools may be used to provided the Compliance Certificate as an output from the MIS 3005 tool • Trainers should be able to explain the importance of considering the effects of any up lift factors or considerations such as

    4. Updates to MIS3005 V4.0

    5. Permitted Development Rights • What are Permitted Development Rights? • Overview of Permitted Development Rights across the UK • MCS 020 – Planning Standard 5 Internal Use

    6. What are Permitted Development Rights? Permitted Development Rights allow homeowners to make certain types of minor changes to their house without needing to apply for planning permission • Certain types of renewable energy technologies are covered • Different rules in the four Home Nations • Always consult your local planning authority for guidance • Permitted Development Rights (and planning permission) do not provide protection against enforcement action under other legislation 6 Internal Use

    7. Permitted Development Rights – Wales and Northern Ireland • Currently – planning permission is required to install a domestic ASHP • In Wales: • Welsh Government has sanctioned drafting of legislation to extend permitted development rights to domestic ASHP • No decision made by National Assembly of Wales yet • Lobbying ongoing to promote a consistent approach to that in England • In Northern Ireland: • No legislation is planned for the near future 7 Internal Use

    8. Permitted Development Rights – Scotland • Only one ASHP can be installed • Must be >100m from the curtilage of another dwelling • If in a conservation area, ASHP must not be visible from a road • Must not be in a World Heritage Site or listed building • Must consult planning authority to see if approval is needed for the siting and appearance of the ASHP 8 Internal Use

    9. Permitted Development Rights – England • Came into force on 1st December 2011 • Installation must comply with MCS 020 • Only one ASHP can be installed • No wind turbine at the property • Heat pump used solely for heating (and DHW) 9 Internal Use

    10. PermittedDevelopment Rights – England • Outdoor unit must not be: • > 0.6m³ in volume • Within 1m of property boundary or the edge of a flat roof • On a pitched roof • On a site designated as a scheduled monument or a listed building • On a wall that fronts the highway • Above the level of ground storey • Additional rules for conservation area and World Heritage Site • Contact your local planning authority 10 Internal Use

    11. MCS 020 Planning Standard • Must be complied with if ASHP is to be permitted development • Installation company has the responsibility to ensure compliance with MCS 020 • Calculations can be checked by the MCS Certification Body and the local planning authority • Both the product and the installer must be MCS accredited 11 Internal Use

    12. MCS 020 Planning Standard Calculation procedure to determine whether the permitted development noise limit of 42 dB LAeq,5mins is met at the assessment position • Installer needs to know: • A-weighted sound power level of the heat pump • Number of reflecting surfaces within one metre of the heat pump • Distance from heat pump to the assessment position • If there is a solid barrier between the heat pump and the assessment position 12 Internal Use

    13. MCS 020 – Assessment position Assessment position is 1m away from the centre point of any doors/windows in the neighbour’s nearest habitable room Habitable room is a room other than a bathroom, shower room, water closet or kitchen 1m Keep detailed notes of the assessment position e.g. address, sketch, etc. 13 Internal Use

    14. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 1 Obtain the A-weighted sound power level of the heat pump from the manufacturer The highest sound power level specified should be used (“low noise mode” should not be used) Example: Manufacturer’s data states the sound power level is 55 dB(A) 14 Internal Use

    15. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 2 Establish the directivity “Q” of the heat pump noise i.e. how many reflective surfaces (including the ground) are within 1 metre of the heat pump Example: Heat pump is to be installed on the ground against a single wall => the directivity (Q) of the heat pump noise is Q4 Directivity ‘Q’ = Reflective Surfaces 2 = Freestanding 4 = One Surface 8 = Two Surfaces 15 Internal Use

    16. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 3 Measure distance from heat pump to the assessment position Example: Distance between heat pump and assessment position is 4 metres Assessment position A position one metre external to the centre point of any door or window to a habitable room of a neighbouring property measured perpendicular to the plane of the door or window 16 Internal Use

    17. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 4 Obtain dB reduction value (relative to distance and reflective surfaces) Example: At 4 metres, Q4 = -17 dB -17 17 Internal Use

    18. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 5 Establish whether there is a solid barrier between the heat pump and the assessment position to obtain an attenuation value -10 a) For a solid barrier (e.g. brick wall or fence) that completely obscures an installer’s vision of an assessment position from the top edge of the ASHP -5 b) Where a solid barrier completely obscures an installer’s vision of an assessment position from the top or side edges of the ASHP, but moving a maximum distance of 25cm in any direction to the ASHP allows an assessment position to be seen 0 a) For a solid barrier (e.g. brick wall or fence) that completely obscures an installer’s vision of an assessment position from the top edge of the ASHP 18 Internal Use

    19. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 6 Calculate the sound pressure level from the heat pump at the assessment position Example: = (55) + (-17) + (-5) = 55 - 17 - 5 = 33dB (A) Lp Sound pressure level at assessment position = (STEP 1) + (STEP 4) + (STEP 5) 19 Internal Use

    20. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 7 Determine the background noise level For MCS 020, the background noise level in all locations is always assumed to be 40 dB(A) Lp 20 Internal Use

    21. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 8 Calculate the difference between background noise level (Step 7) and the heat pump sound pressure level at the assessment position (Step 6) Difference: = (STEP 7) – (STEP 6) Example: = 40 dB(A) – 33 dB(A) = 7dB(A) 21 Internal Use

    22. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 9 Obtain the decibel correction figure based on result from Step 8 Add this to whichever is the higher dB figure from STEP 6 and STEP 7 Round this number up to the nearest whole number Example: Step 8 = 7dBa Decibel correction = 0.8 dB Step 6 = 33dbA Step 7 = 40 dB(A) Corrected noise = 40.8 dB(A) Round up to 41 dB(A) 22 Internal Use

    23. MCS 020 – Calculation Procedure STEP 10 Is the FINAL RESULT (step 9) lower than the permitted development noise limit of 42 dB(A)? YES The ASHP will comply with the permitted development noise limit for this assessment position and may be permitted development (subject to compliance with other permitted development limitations/conditions and parts of this standard). NOTE - Other assessment positions may also need to be tested. NO The ASHP will not be permitted development. Installation may still go ahead if planning permission is granted by the local planning authority. 23 Internal Use

    24. Sound calculation tools are available from many manufacturers Designed to assist installers to assess the noise level from a given manufacturers ASHP 24 Internal Use

    25. Summary • Planning permission is required for ASHP in Wales and Northern Ireland • Permitted Development Rights exist in Scotland and England • Different assessment criteria in both countries • If the criteria is met, planning permission is not required • In England, MCS installer must calculate noise limit based on MCS 020 • Calculated at a specified assessment position – 1m away from the window/door of a neighbouring property • Calculated figure must be less than 42 dB LAeq, 5mins • Always check with the local planning office 25 Internal Use

    26. Heat Emitter Guide MCS 021 Insert title here Presented by: XXXXXX

    27. Introduction • Heat Emitter Guide is an integral component of the MCS assessment and forms the basis for estimating RHI income • Officially an MCS document [MCS 021] • Originally created by joint trade associations for use with MIS 3005 • Can be used for existing emitter systems and new installations 27

    28. Heat Emitter Guide [HEG] • A tool to aid installers and end users to understand the relationship between flow temperature and SPF • MCS heat pump installer must communicate with the heat emitter designer to optimise the design of both systems • HEG is not a detailed design tool. Intended to stimulate a proper review of the dwelling-specific heat load and heat emitter design, leading to optimised performance and low running costs • The “Heat Emitter Guide” is not a substitute for accurate site-specific design carried out in accordance with national standards 28

    29. Important notes for MCS installers • Before the customer signs the contract, the installer shall, in writing: • Make the customer aware of all specific room heat losses (in W/m2); • Identify the type of emitter(s) to be used in the system; • Make the customer aware of the design emitter temperature based on the worst performing room; • Agree with the customer the “Temperature Star Rating” for the design emitter temperature, also making clear the maximum achievable “Temperature Star Rating”. • Additionally, before the customer signs the contract, the installer should: • Show the customer a relevant extract of the Heat Emitter Guide; • Explain the Heat Emitter Guide, including how it is possible to achieve a higher system SPF; • Explain how the design emitter temperature will be achieved using the type of emitter selected. 29

    30. Selecting heat emitters for heat pump systems • Always design for the water flow temperature to be as low as possible to: • Achieve the highest possible SPF • Achieve the lowest possible running costs and CO2 emissions • New build properties – heating distribution system can be designed to work efficiently at the low water flow temperatures produced by a heat pump • Existing building – will existing heat emitters output sufficient heat at the lower flow temperature of the heat pump? • Check by calculation and by using the Heat Emitter Guide • Reduce the heat losses. It might then be possible to run heat emitters at a lower temp • Change heat emitters e.g. increase size of radiators, install fan coil units/heat pump convectors • If heat loss cannot be reduced and heat emitters cannot be changed, consider a bivalent heat pump / boiler system instead 30

    31. HEG – procedure for existing systems • For every room calculate the heat loss. • For a system with radiators, determine the rated output at mean water to air temperature difference of 50°C using Tables of Heat Emitter Outputs (available separately). • Divide the rated output by room heat loss. • Determine the radiator Oversize Factor for each room. • Determine the Temperature Star Rating for each room. • For every room: • check the room specific heat loss (W/m2); • use the Guidance Table and colour coding to check that the emitter and flow temperature is suitable. 31

    32. Oversize Factor for each room heated by radiators • For every room, divide the radiator rated output by the room heat loss to determine the Oversize Factor • For every room, use this table to determine the Temperature Star Rating 32

    33. HEG – Temperature Star Rating • The Temperature Star Rating indicates the likely system efficiency based on the worst performing room and flow temperature from the heat pump prior to any blending valves 33

    34. Achieving a higher Temperature Star Rating 34

    35. HEG – likely space heating SPF for RHI purposes • Heat pump operating SPF is limited by the worst performing room • For the worst performing room, use the Temperature Star Rating to confirm the GSHP or ASHP likely space heating SPF • This is the likely performance of the whole system • The likely space heating SPF is used for RHI PURPOSES • For RHI, the likely SPF must be 2.5 or over. For ASHP, this equates to minimum SPF 2.7 with a maximum flow temperature of 50°C 35

    36. Guidance Table • For every room - • check the room specific heat loss (W/m2) • use the Guidance Table to check that the emitter and flow temperature is suitable 36

    37. Guidance Table in detail < 30 W/m2 30-50 W/m2 50-80 W/m2 80-100 W/m2 100-120 W/m2 120-150 W/m2 Temperature Star Rating indicates efficiency – 6 stars is most efficient Oversize factor x room heat loss = required emitter output at (MWT – AT) of 50 Typical UFH pipe spacing for aluminium panel systems Nominal SPF assumes weather compensation and excludes DHW provision Typical UFH pipe spacing for screed systems Flow temp at peak design conditions 37

    38. Colour coding

    39. HEG calculation example #1 Note that this system would not be eligible for RHI • An example of a poorly-insulated room is assumed to be in London (design outside air temperature = -1.8°C) with single glazing. The heating is assumed to be used continuously • Room heat loss: 1671W • Size of existing radiator: 1600mm L, 700mm H, 103mm D (double panel) • Existing radiator rated output at MW-AT at 50°C = 1938W • Calculate the Oversize Factor and look up the Temperature Star Rating on the chart • Oversize factor: 1938/1671 = 1.2 • Temperature Star Rating: [no stars] • Radiator flow temperature: > 60°C 39

    40. HEG calculation example #2 – Reduce the energy losses Note that an ASHP in this system would not be eligible for RHI • Reducing the fabric and ventilation heat loss is an efficient way of increasing the Temperature Star Rating. It reduces energy consumption and improves the system efficiency. Always consider reducing heat losses when making changes to a house. • In this example, external walls have cavity wall insulation added, windows are replaced with A-rated double glazing, 50mm of underfloor insulation is added, and the room is carefully draught-proofed to reduce the heat loss. • Improved room heat loss: 976W • New oversize factor: 1938/976 = 2.0 • New Temperature Star Rating: 2 stars • Radiator flow temperature: 55°C • Likely GSHP heating SPF: 3.1 • Likely ASHP heating SPF: 2.4 40

    41. HEG calculation example #3 – Upsize the radiators Note that an ASHP in this system would not be eligible for RHI • Upgrading the existing radiator to one that has a higher rated output is another way of increasing the Temperature Star Rating: • Size of new radiator: 1600mm L, 700mm H, 135mm D (this is a double convector with the same frontal area as the existing radiator) • New radiator rated output: 3269W • New oversize factor: 3269/1671 = 2.0 • New Temperature Star Rating: 2 stars • Radiator flow temperature: 55°C • Likely GSHP heating SPF: 3.1 • Likely ASHP heating SPF: 2.4 41

    42. HEG calculation example #4 – reduce heat losses and upsize radiators Note that an ASHP in this system would be eligible for RHI • The two previous examples can be combined to produce a more efficient installation • Improved room heat loss: 976W • New radiator rated output: 3269W • New oversize factor: 3269/976 = 3.4 • New Temperature Star Rating: 4 stars • Radiator flow temperature: 45°C • Likely GSHP heating SPF: 3.7 • Likely ASHP heating SPF: 3.0 42

    43. Flow temperatures and radiators • Typical flow temperature ranges • Low temperature ASHP 25°C-55°C • Typical boiler 55°C-80°C • Radiators typical design mean water temperature of 70°C 43

    44. What is Mean Water Temperature? • Mean Water Temperature MWT = (flow temperature + return temperature)/ 2 • Note : For many heat pump systems, the difference between flow and return temperature is often 5°C • For a typical heat pump system with a design flow temperature of 45°C, the return temperature would be 40°C and the Mean Water Temperature would be 42.5°C • The Heat Emitter Guide asks installers to calculate output of radiators at a Mean Water to Air Temperature difference of 50°C • Mean Water to Air Temperature difference = MWT – room air temperature • For a typical heat pump system as above, with design room air temperature of 21°C • Mean Water to Air Temperature difference = 22.5°C 44

    45. Radiator Correction factors • Typical radiator data is given at 75/65/20 (flow/return/room air temps) • Table shows radiator sizing factors at different MWT-AT with AT at 20°C • Mean Water Temperature = 70°C • The difference between the mean water temperature and the room air temperature dT = 50°C (i.e. 70°C-20°C=50°C). The correction factor is 1 • For a heat pump, the typical water flow temperature is up to about 55°C. • Table below shows correction factors for typical conditions with heat pump. • A higher water flow temperature increases the correction factor and reduces the size of radiator required BUT will reduce heat pump efficiency. • The correction factor for the chosen operating conditions is then applied to the manufacturers data at 75/65/20 to give the output of the radiator at the lower water flow temperature.

    46. Radiator Correction factors Example – room heat loss is 1000W. Existing radiator provides 1028W at 75/65/20. Room heat loss is divided by correction factor to size radiator at each flow condition. 1 2 3

    47. Example table of Heat Emitter Outputs 47

    48. Radiators – using existing system • If it is possible to use the existing radiators then always consider: • Flushing and cleaning the entire heating distribution system to remove as much sludge deposits as possible e.g. power flushing, chemically cleaning • Be aware that this may now expose small holes in the pipework of old systems • Installing an additional dirt separator / filter on the return to the heat pump to reduce the amount of sludge entering the heat exchanger 48

    49. Underfloor heating – design considerations • Factors affecting the heat output from underfloor heating include: • Type of floor construction e.g. solid concrete or timber suspended • Amount of insulation installed underneath the pipework – as much as possible! • Floor covering e.g. tiles conduct heat better than carpet which acts as an insulator • To maximise performance of the heat pump: • Keep flow temperatures as low as possible • Ensure delta T between flow and return is in line with the heat pump requirements • Typically with a heat pump running at 40°C, the maximum output from the UFH in a room with a fitted carpet is 53W/m² • Pump mixing sets on underfloor heating manifolds: • Try and avoid blending valves and mixing sets with low temperature heat pumps • Where installed, the pump will need to be interlocked with the integral circulation pump to ensure simultaneous operation, or a low loss header/buffer tank must be installed • Recommend that a detailed system design is carried out by the underfloor heating manufacturer

    50. Example Heat loss Calculations and the application of intermittent use factors