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Daily Planning for Today’s Mathematics Classroom. Math 413 Professor Mitchell Concepts taken from Daily Planning for Today’s Classroom by Kay M. Price and Karna L. Nelson. Introduction. An effective lesson plan begins with a relevant clearly written objective. Definition and Purpose.

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daily planning for today s mathematics classroom

Daily Planning for Today’s Mathematics Classroom

Math 413

Professor Mitchell

Concepts taken from Daily Planning for Today’s Classroom by Kay M. Price and Karna L. Nelson

introduction
Introduction
  • An effective lesson plan begins with a relevant clearly written objective.
definition and purpose
Definition and Purpose
  • An objective is a description of a learning outcome.
  • Objectives describe where we want students to go – not how they will get there.
  • Well written objectives clarify what teachers want their students to learn, help provide lesson focus and direction, and help guide the selection of appropriate practice.
example of a state standard content standard 1 grade 4
Example of a State StandardContent Standard#1 Grade 4
  • Use models, benchmarks and equivalent forms to judge the size of fractions (in relation to ½,1/4, ¾ and the whole and decimals in situations relevant to students’)
number and operations standard for grades 3 5 expectations example of the nctm standard
Number and Operations Standard for Grades 3-5 Expectations Example of the NCTM Standard
  • In grades 3-5 all students should-Use models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms to judge the size of fractions
  • Recognize and generate equivalent forms of commonly used fractions, decimals and percents
from general to specific going from state standards to objectives
From General to Specific: Going from State Standards to Objectives
  • While state and national standards provide general content ideas, teachers are responsible for writing their own objectives for their lessons, activities and units.
  • A teacher’s job is to translate the standards into useful objectives that are used to guide instruction.
  • The learning outcomes included in the objectives will then be linked to the state standards.
how standards goals and objectives differ
How standards, goals, and objectives differ…
  • Specific –Objectives include specific learning outcomes where standards include general outcome statements.
  • Goals may be general, for example, understand the concept of fractions.
  • Long-Term or Short Term –Objectives are considered short term, they describe the learning outcome typically in days, or weeks.
  • Goals and standards describe learning outcomes that may be in weeks, months or years.
how standards goals and objectives differ1
How standards, goals, and objectives differ…
  • Uses – Objectives are used in lesson and activity plans and IEPs.
  • Measurable annual goals are included in IEPs.
  • Goals may also be found in units of instruction. For example, a goal may be to understand how to add fractions.
  • A specific objective may be to be able to add fractions will common denominators.
examples of goals and objectives related to state standards
Examples of Goals and Objectives Related to State Standards
  • Students will write answers to 20 subtraction problems (two-digit numbers from three-digit numbers with re-grouping) on a worksheet, with two errors.
the four components of an objective
The Four Components of an Objective
  • Content- In the example given the contentissubtraction problems (two-digit numbers from three-digit numbers with re-grouping)
behavior
Behavior
  • Behavior- the behavior tells what the students will do to show that they have learned.
  • It is a verb that describes an observable action. In this example the behavior is “write”. The student will demonstrate knowledge of subtraction by writing the answers to the 20 problems. (See Bloom)
condition
Condition
  • Condition-It is important to describe the conditions or circumstances under which the student will perform the behavior.
  • In the example objective, the condition is “on a worksheet” not in a real world context.
criterion
Criterion
  • Criterion-The criterion is the level of acceptance performance, the standard of mastery of proficiency level expected.
  • In the objective above, the criterion is with two errors.
examples and nonexamples of content
Examples and Nonexamples of Content
  • Add unlike fractions with common factors between denominators
  • ________________________________
  • Add fractions on page 42, 1 to 7
examples and nonexamples of behavior
Examples and Nonexamples of Behavior
  • Diagram, operate, order, compare/contrast
  • _________________________________
  • Know, understand, memorize, learn
examples and nonexamples of conditions
Examples and Nonexamples of Conditions
  • Given ten problems and a calculator
  • __________________________________
  • Given a blank piece of paper, when asked by the teacher (obvious)
examples and nonexamples of criterion
Examples and Nonexamples of Criterion
  • With no errors
  • With 80 percent accuracy
  • Within 10 minutes
  • To the nearest tenth
  • __________________________
  • As judged by the teacher
  • To the teacher’s satisfaction
a final thought
A Final Thought
  • It is very important to begin your lesson or activity with a clear idea of what you want your students to learn.
  • Writing a specific objective with the four components will cause you to think this through.
  • When teachers experience frustration with a particular lesson, they often have not stated a measurable objective.
  • If you clearly state the objective, you will know if your activity or lesson and your intended learning outcome match. You will be able to tell if your teaching was effective and whether your students learned.