getting to yes in your negotiations l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Getting to Yes in your negotiations PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Getting to Yes in your negotiations

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 34

Getting to Yes in your negotiations - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 329 Views
  • Uploaded on

Getting to Yes in your negotiations. Randy Richards St. Ambrose University Tuesday 5.16, Sessions 4 and 5 12:00 to 1:30 and 2:00 to 3:00. Agenda. The Problem Positions The Method Separate people from problem Focus on interests, not positions Invent options for mutual gain

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Getting to Yes in your negotiations' - teal


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
getting to yes in your negotiations

Getting to Yesin your negotiations

Randy Richards

St. Ambrose University

Tuesday 5.16,

Sessions 4 and 5

12:00 to 1:30 and 2:00 to 3:00

agenda
Agenda
  • The Problem
    • Positions
  • The Method
    • Separate people from problem
    • Focus on interests, not positions
    • Invent options for mutual gain
    • Insist on using objective criteria
  • Yes, But. . .
    • What if they are more powerful?
      • More on BATNAs
    • What if they don’t want to negotiate?
    • What if they don’t negotiate fairly?
  • Summing up
don t negotiate over positions
Don’t negotiate over positions
  • Unwise agreements
  • Inefficient
  • Endangers a long term relationship
  • Being a nice person is no help
  • Focus on interests and negotiate in a principled way.
separate people from problem
Separate people from problem

Negotiators are people first

Two basic interests: the substance and the relationship

Positional bargaining puts the two in conflict

Deal with relationship as a separate consideration

manage your perceptions
Manage your perceptions
  • Put yourself in their shoes
  • Don’t deduce their motives from your fears
  • Don’t blame them for your problem
  • Discuss each perceptions
  • Give them a stake by getting them to participate
  • Make your proposals consistent with their values
control your emotions
Control your emotions
  • Be aware and identify your own emotions
  • Same for them
  • Talk about emotions explicitly
  • Allow them to vent interfering emotions
    • Anger and fear, common
  • Do not react to emotional outbursts
  • Use symbolic gestures
concentrate on communication
Concentrate on communication
  • Listen actively and acknowledge
  • Speak to be understood
  • Speak about you, not them
  • Speak for a purpose
start before problems arise
Start before problems arise
  • Build a working relationship immediately
  • Focus on the problem, not them
focus on interests not positions
Focus on interests not positions
  • Reconcile interests
  • Identify their interests
  • Talk openly about interests
reconcile interests
Reconcile Interests
  • Interests define the problem
  • Behind positions lie interests
  • Interest categories
    • Compatible
    • Shared
    • Conflicting
identify their interests
Identify their interests
  • Ask “Why?”
  • Ask “Why not?”
    • What are their other choices?
  • Multiple interests
    • Recall our earlier class discussions of this
  • Interests: the power of basic human needs
  • Making lists
talk openly about interests
Talk openly about interests
  • Show concern for their interests
  • Put their problem ahead of your answer
  • Make your interests come alive
  • Look ahead, not behind
  • Be concrete but flexible
  • Hard on problem, soft on people
invent options for mutual gain
Invent options for mutual gain
  • Diagnosing the problem
  • Solving the problem
diagnosis before prescription
Diagnosis before prescription
  • Be the Problem Doctor:
    • Problems of premature solutions
    • Searching for the single answer
    • Fixed pie? Are you sure?
    • Solving their problem is my problem.
prescription methods
Prescription methods
  • Separate inventing from deciding
  • Broaden your options
  • Look for mutual gains
  • Make their decision easy
separate inventing from deciding
Separate inventing from deciding
  • Before brainstorming
  • During brainstorming
  • After brainstorming
  • Helping them brainstorm

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Invent Options First

Decide which is best

broaden your options
Broaden your options
  • Look for help from a variety of experts
  • Invent agreements of different strengths
  • Change the scope of a proposed agreement
  • Multiply options: the Circle Chart exercise (next)
circle chart for inventing options
Circle Chart for Inventing Options

Step III: Approaches

Possible strategies

Theoretical fixes

Broad ideas about what to do

Step II: Analysis

Sort symptoms into groups

Possible causes

What’s missing

Barriers to solving

Step I: Problem

What’s wrong?

Symptoms?

Reality vs Desired Future

Step IV: Action Ideas

What specific steps

Goals

Verify

look for mutual gains
Look for mutual gains
  • Identify shared interests
  • Merge differing interests
    • What is the difference?
    • Different beliefs?
    • What is their value of time?
    • Different forecasts about the future?
    • Risk aversion differences?
  • What are their preferences?
make their decision easy
Make their decision easy
  • Whose shoes?
  • What decision?
  • When threatening is not enough
insist on using objective criteria
Insist on using objective criteria
  • Deciding based on strength of will
  • Case for objective criteria
  • Developing objective criteria
  • Negotiating with objective criteria
  • Joint search for objective criteria
  • Reason and be open to reason
  • Never yield to pressure
deciding based on strength of will
Deciding based on strength of will
  • Too costly
    • Substance
    • Relationships
  • Someone has to back down
    • No one wants to do that, loss of face
    • Leads to irrational choices
case for objective criteria
Case for objective criteria
  • Principled negotiations
    • Smarter
      • Finding data, information that help inform a better decisions for both parties
    • Efficient
      • No time wasted in testing each other’s will
    • Less hostility
      • No need to get angry if we looking for objective data
    • Protects the relationship
      • Mutual hunt for an objective basis
developing objective criteria
Fair standards

Market value

Precedent

Scientific judgments

Professional standards

Efficiency

Costs

Court decisions

Equal treatment

Fair procedures

Coin flips

Cut and choose

Veil of ignorance choices – not knowing your part

Taking turns

Drawing lots

Letting a third party decide

Choosing the last best offer

Developing objective criteria

Criteria need to be independent of each side’s will

Legitimate and practical

negotiating with objective criteria
Negotiating with objective criteria

Frame each issue as the joint search for objective measures of value, facts, etc.

Reason and be open to reason as to what to accept as appropriate standards

Never yield to pressure, only to principle.

the joint search for objective criteria
The joint search for objective criteria
  • What is fair to both sides?
  • What is your theory about what is fair?
  • Agree first on principles.
reason and be open to reason
Reason and be open to reason
  • Keep an open mind
  • Possibility of multiple criteria of fairness
    • What objective basis is there to decide?
    • Splitting the difference or compromising
never yield to pressure
Never yield to pressure
  • Pressure to yield takes many forms
    • Bribes
    • Threats
    • Stubbornness
  • Question the process, look for objective criteria
  • This is why you have a BATNA!!!!
yes but
Yes, but . . .
  • What if they
  • are more powerful?
  • won’t negotiate?
  • won’t negotiate fairly?
what if they are more powerful
What if they are more powerful?
  • Protect yourself from making a bad decision.
    • The problem of being too accommodating
    • The problem of being too inflexible
    • Know your BATNA: all offers are measured against it.
  • Make the most of your assets
    • Better BATNA = More Power
    • Develop your assets into a BATNA
      • Invent a list of actions you could take if the negotiation fails
      • Improve the ideas and convert to practical alternatives
      • Tentatively select the alternative that seems best
what if they won t negotiate
What if they won’t negotiate?
  • You can concentrate on interest / merits not positions.
    • Everything we have looked at so far
  • If they don’t respond, focus on what they might do. Negotiation jujitsu.
negotiation jujitsu
Negotiation jujitsu
  • The typical attack has three parts;
    • Aggressively asserting their own position
    • Attack your ideas!
    • Attack you!
  • You should
    • Look behind attack for motivating interests.
    • Treat their position as one possible option.
    • Don’t defend your ideas
      • Invite criticism and advice
    • Re-frame attacks on you as attacks on the problem
    • Use more questions, make fewer statements
what if they won t negotiate fairly
Deliberate deception

Unless you have good reason to trust someone, don’t trust them.

Check facts, assertions, etc.

Unclear authority

Making you think they have power to decide

Asking you to concede but claiming they don’t have power

Before you begin, ask how much authority they have to make the decisions.

Questionable intentions of the other side

Make your doubts public

Negotiate assurances in the agreement

Creating purposely stressful situations

Acknowledge the stressors and ask for some adjustments

Personal attacks

Recognize it and call it to their attention

Threats

Recognize and call attention to it. Treat as pressure.

What if they won’t negotiate fairly?