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Inuit Homelands in Canada For our the wonderful educators at Vistas, Visions and Voices Denver, November 2010 by Nadine C. Fabbi. Stan Rogers, 1949-1983 http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8315817712851371947#. Pytheas of Massalia 4 th century BCE Thule / Ultima Thule

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slide1

Inuit Homelands in Canada

For our the wonderful educators at Vistas, Visions and Voices

Denver, November 2010

by Nadine C. Fabbi

slide2

Stan Rogers, 1949-1983

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8315817712851371947#

slide3

Pytheas of Massalia

4th century BCE

Thule / Ultima Thule

“borders beyond the known world”

slide7

King Christian IV’s throne.

Rosenborg Castle, Copenhagen.

slide9

1576

Frobisher Bay

Iqaluit

slide13

John Torrington, 20

“Franklinalia”

slide17

Long ago, in my childhood, we followed the seasons and the weather. Even the animals, the caribou followed the weather. Now there are hardly any caribou on the island. Life has become unpredictable for all of us. – Sarah Kuptana, Sachs Harbour, Canada

slide20

Arctic States …

  • eight bordering on Arctic Circle
slide21

Arctic Circle - parallel of latitude – 66˚

1/6th of earth’s surface

4 million people / 400,000 aboriginal

slide23

Tree line around the Globe

2,000

55,000

50,000

45,000

slide24

155,000

Greenland

Alaska

Canada

Russia

slide26

5,000

25,000

5,000

10,000

slide27

45,000

Inuvialuit

Nunavut

Nunavik

Nunatsiavut

slide31

Jan/Feb 2003

“the purest building the human mind has ever conceived”

slide35

inuksukᐃᓄᒃᓱᒃ

inuksuitᐃᓄᒃᓱᐃᑦ

slide36

kayak

umiak

slide38

34,000,000

1,000,000

slide39

Canada’s

Aboriginal

People

1. First Nations

(600,000)

2. Métis (300,000)

3. Inuit (45,000)

slide40
First Nations

12,000-24,000 years ago

slide42

mid-1600s to early 1700s:

distinct people “emerge”

ancestors
Ancestors

Sivullirmiut (to 1000)

Thule/Tuniit (to 1600)

Inuit

slide45

History of Relations

1576-mid 19th - exploration

1850s-1930s - whaling/fur industry

1950s/60s - government intervention

1970s on - self-determination

slide46

History of Relations …

1850s-1930s - whaling/fur industry

slide49

1/3rd size of the entire body

baleen or whalebone

keratin

slide50

up to 700

baleen

“hairs”

slide52
Richard

Harrington

slide53

John Diefenbaker

1957-63

“ … Sir John A. Macdonald saw Canada from east to west: He opened the west. I see a new Canada -- a Canada of the North. This is the vision."

slide56
History of Relations - Self-Determination - 1970s onInuit Tapirisat of Canada - 1971(Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami)
slide58

Nunavik – 1975 Inuvialuit - 1984

Nunavut - 1993

Nunatsiavut - 2005

slide59

Nunavik

Northern Québec

10,000 Nunavimmiut

slide60

James Bay & Northern Québec Agreement

11 November 1975

Zebedee Nungak

slide64

Nunavut

“our land”

1 April 1999

20% land mass

85% Inuit

slide68

“The birth of Nunavut is a significant step in Canada’s nation building. The territory’s creation is anchored in the central idea that Canada’s flexible federation supports diversity. Nunavut is both an historic and extraordinary achievement. At a time when borders are often a source of strife, the map of Canada is being redrawn in peace and partnership.”

slide71

1977

Eben Hopson - Alaskan Inuk

slide72

Arctic States …

  • eight bordering on Arctic Circle
slide73

Arctic Council

  • Ottawa Declaration 1996
slide74

Eight Arctic peoples

Russian North: Evenks Khanty Koryaks Nenets Chukchi Yukaghir

Saami – Norway/Sweden/Finland/Russia

Inuit – Canada, US, Greenland, Russia

Cartographer / Designer, Philippe Rekacewicz, 2005

slide76

“Sovereignty … used to refer to the absolute and independent authority of a community or nation … Sovereignty is a contested concept, however … old ideas of sovereignty are breaking down as different governance models, such as the European Union, evolve.” Article 2.1

slide77

address growing outside interest in Inuit Nunaat (homeland)

“The conduct of international relations in the Arctic and the resolution of international disputes are not the sole preserve of Arctic states or other states; they are also within the purview of the Arctic’s indigenous peoples.” Article 4.2

slide78

Thank you!

Nakurmiik!

Whistler, British Columbia

http://www.youtube.com/user/andshegotaway