the era of good feelings is over regional differences and the missouri compromise n.
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The Era of Good Feelings is OVER !!! Regional Differences and the Missouri Compromise - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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The Era of Good Feelings is OVER !!! Regional Differences and the Missouri Compromise. When James Monroe was re-elected in 1820, the American people hoped that the Era of Good Feelings would continue. But, sadly, that was not the case!

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Presentation Transcript
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When James Monroe was re-elected in 1820, the American people hoped that the Era of Good Feelings would continue. But, sadly, that was not the case!
  • Three distinct regions (North, South, and West)of the country emerge and they rarely agree on what is best for the nation!!
regional differences
Regional Differences
  • The 3 regions of the country (North, South and West) had different ideas on how the country should develop.
  • The North wanted to protect their industries. Their main competition for consumers was Great Britain.
  • The South wanted to protect their agricultural products such as cotton and tobacco. Great Britain was one of their biggest purchasers which pitted them against the North.
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The West was primarily concerned about development in the west and how they would get their products to markets in the other parts of the United States was well as abroad.
  • Three men represented these regions in Congress. They were-

1. Daniel Webster represented the North.

2. Henry Clay represented the West.

3. John C. Calhoun represented the South.

the missouri compromise
The Missouri Compromise
  • A major regional conflict arose in 1819 when Missouri applied to enter the Union. Pro-slavery leaders in Missouri wanted to join the nation as a slave state. At the time, there were 11 slave states and 11 free states.
  • Admitting Missouri would have upset the balance of power in the Senate in favor of the South.
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c. Heated debate raged in Congress with no compromise in sight until Henry Clay stepped in.
  • Clay’s Missouri Compromise had 3 main conditions-

1. Missouri would enter the Union as a slave state.

2. Maine would join the Union as a free state.

3. Slavery would be prohibited in any new territories or states formed north of the 36, 30 line of latitude.

the election of 1824
The Election of 1824
  • The Election of 1824 showed increasing regional differences.
  • The candidates in this election were-

1. Henry Clay-West

2. John Quincy Adams-son of 2nd president John Adams-North

3. Andrew Jackson-war hero from the War of 1812.

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When the votes were counted, Jackson had won the popular vote, but not the electoral college. Because of this, the winner had to be decided by the House of Representatives.
  • Henry Clay was the Speaker of the House at this time, giving him LOTS of power and influence in Congress. He used this influence to support John Quincy Adams who became the 6th president of the United States.
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John Quincy Adams made Henry Clay his secretary of state which led Jackson and his supporters to call the election a “corrupt bargain.”
  • This controversy weakened Adams’ support and Congress rejected most of his ideas.