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2013 Final Year Engineering Student Survey - Atlantic Report Conducted by Ipsos Reid on behalf of Engineers Canada. April 2013. Table of Contents. Research Objectives 3 Methodology 4 Executive Summary 6 Future Plans 10

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slide1

2013 Final Year Engineering Student Survey - Atlantic ReportConducted by Ipsos Reid on behalf of Engineers Canada

April 2013

table of contents
Table of Contents

Research Objectives 3

Methodology 4

Executive Summary 6

Future Plans 10

Application Intentions for Professional Engineering Licensure 16

Licensing Knowledge 26

Provincial Engineering Association 32

Professional Engineers Act 35

Demographics 38

Additional Analysis: Impact on Intention to Pursue

Attendance at Seminar/Workshop 42

Knowledge of the PEA 45

Knowledge of Licensing and Roles 48

Knowledge of Organizational Responsibility 51

research objectives
Research Objectives

The primary objective of this research is to understand the reasons why graduates of CEAB accredited engineering programs do or do not intend to apply for their licence. 

In order to achieve this objective, the research seeks to understand the following:

  • The future career and/or education plans of final year engineering students;
  • The percentage of final year engineering students who intend to pursue a career in Engineering and the percentage who intend to apply for their P.Eng licence;
  • Final year engineering students’ level of knowledge of the Professional Engineers Act of their province.
methodology
Methodology

The online survey was conducted between January 18 to March 15, 2013 with final year engineering students.

All university Faculties of Engineering with CEAB accredited programs were invited to participate in the study and were asked to send the online survey to all final year engineering students registered in their Engineering program.

The link to the online survey was sent to the universities starting January 18 (for Ontario universities) with a second set of links distributed January 24, 2013 (for all other schools). Each university was requested to send the survey link to all qualified students on either January 19, 2013 (Ontario) or January 25, 2013 (all other schools).

The survey was offered in both English and French.

methodology cont d
Methodology (cont’d)
  • At the national level, a total of 34 universities participated in the research and 2,501 students completed the survey.
  • Within the Atlantic provinces specifically (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland), 3 schools participated and a total of n=106 students completed the survey.
  • The margin of error for this study (n=106) is ± 9.5%, 19 times out of 20.
  • For certain questions, the base size was too low to include in reporting. These include:
    • Q16, Q17 and Q18 (only n=2 responded to these questions)
    • Q23 (only n=3 responded to this question)
  • Please note: base sizes under n=30 are considered very small and should be interpreted with caution
executive summary
Executive Summary

Future Intentions: Continuing Education Versus Entering Workforce

  • Over eight in ten (84%) final year engineering students say they intend to go into the workforce after graduating with their bachelors degree in Engineering.
  • One in ten (12%) students intend to pursue more education. Of this group, the vast majority (n=10) plan to pursue a graduate degree in engineering. Due to very small base sizes, results should be interpreted with caution.
  • Among those students who plan to pursue more education, Ontario and New Brunswick are mentioned most often as the location for further studies.

Future Intentions: Engineering Career

  • Virtually all students (98%) say they are likely to pursue a career in engineering, eight in ten definitely will (83%) while slightly more than one in ten probably will (15%).
  • Very few students (2%) probablywill not pursue a career in engineering, while none indicate they definitely will not.
  • Over nine in ten (95%) students say that when they began their studies they planned to practice engineering upon completion of their program. Seven in ten students began their undergraduate studies with a definite intention to pursue an engineering career (69%), while one quarter said it was likely (26%).
executive summary continued
Executive Summary (continued)

Future Intentions: Engineering Career (continued)

  • Consistent with the overall level, over nine in ten students who intend to pursue a career in engineering say they were definitely (70%) or likely (26%) to pursue a career in the engineering field when they began their studies. Fewer than one in ten (5%) say they originally intended to pursue an alternate career.

Future Intentions: Pursue Licensure

  • Four in ten of all students (40%) indicate that they definitely intend to apply for licensure, while nearly three in ten (28%) say they probably will. One quarter of student are unlikely to apply, of which nearly two in ten probably won’t (16%), while one in ten definitely won’t apply (9%). Fewer than one in ten don’t know (7%).
    • Of those students who specifically plan to pursue an engineering career, 40% indicate they definitely will and 29% probably will pursue their licence.
  • Of those who do not intend to immediately pursue their licence, eight in ten indicate that they probably or definitely will apply for licensure sometime down the road (81%), while one in ten do not foresee themselves applying in the future (11%) or don’t know (7%). Due to very small base sizes, results should be interpreted with caution.
  • Once told that a licence is required to legally refer to yourself as an engineer and practice as an engineer, the vast majority (n=8) of those who originally did not plan to pursue their licencenow indicate they are definitely or probably to do so. Due to very small base sizes, results should be interpreted with caution.
executive summary continued1
Executive Summary (continued)

Future Intentions: Pursue Licensure (continued)

  • Of those who intend to pursue their licence, two-thirds of students plan to do so within one year (67%), of which exactly half will do so within six months (50%). Slightly more than one in ten intend to apply after a year (14%), while two in ten remain undecided (20%).
  • Among those students who plan to wait at least a year to apply for licensure or are unsure, the vast majority (n=28) cite the desire for required work experience as the reason for the delay or uncertainty.
    • Upon learning that the fee for the first year of the Engineering-in-Training [EIT] program can be waived if they apply within six months of graduation, over eight in ten (84%) say they are at least likely to apply within 6 months.

Knowledge of Engineering Profession

  • At eight in ten (82%), the vast majority of students know that engineering is regulated by legislation, while one in ten believe it is not and 5% are unsure.
  • Students’ knowledge of the Professional Engineers Act of their respective province is varied, over four in ten students report having a fair amount (43%) or just a little knowledge (45%) about the Professional Engineers Act, while 3% claim to know a lot about it. Only 2% say they have never heard of the Act.
  • Nine in ten students know that a licence is required to perform engineering work independently (92%) while seven in ten know it is needed to use the title ‘Engineer’ (72%). Eight in ten meanwhile know that it is not required to practice engineering work under the supervision of a P.Eng (78%).
executive summary continued2
Executive Summary (continued)

Knowledge of Engineering Profession (continued)

  • The vast majority of students are able to correctly identify that their respective provincial engineering association is the organization responsible for licensing engineers (82%) and that it also regulates the practice of professional engineers (74%). Comparatively, nearly nine in ten students know that CEAB is the organization that accredits University engineering programs (86%).
  • Students are split however on which organization licenses companies offering engineering services, six in ten believe it is CEAB (60%), while half feel it is their respective provincial engineering association (52%) and almost two in ten don’t know (16%).
plans after graduation
Plans After Graduation
  • Over eight in ten students intend on going into the workforce after graduation, while one in ten plan to pursue more education.
  • Among those who plan to further their education, the vast majority (n=10) plan to pursue a graduate degree in engineering. Due to very small base sizes, results should be interpreted with caution.

Current Plans After Graduation

Educational Intentions

Q12. Which of the following best describes your current plans after you graduate? Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106) Q13. Which of the following best describes the education you plan to pursue? Base: Respondents who said “more education” in Q12, 2013 (n=12).

location of anticipated graduate education
Location of Anticipated Graduate Education
  • Among those students who plan to pursue more education, Ontario and New Brunswick are mentioned most often as the location for further studies. Due to very small base sizes, results should be interpreted with caution.

Location of Graduate Intentions

Q13B. Where do you plan to pursue graduate education? Base: Pursue more education after graduation - (n=12)

intention to pursue engineering career
Intention to Pursue Engineering Career
  • Virtually all students intend on pursuing a career in the engineering field after completing their education.

Do You Plan to Pursue a Career in the Engineering Field?

98%(n=104)

Yes(Top 2 Box)

No(Low 2 Box)

2%(n=2)

Q14. When you complete your education, do you plan to pursue a career in the engineering field? Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

career plans when studies commenced
Career Plans When Studies Commenced

Did You Plan to Practice Engineering When You Began Your Studies?

Yes(Top 2 Box)

95%(n=101)

No(Low 2 Box)

5%(n=5)

Q18. When you began your studies, did you plan to practice engineering when you completed your program? Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

At over nine in ten, nearly all students say that when they began their studies they planned to practice engineering upon completion of their program.

current and prior career intentions among students who intend to pursue a career in engineering
Current and Prior Career Intentions (among students who intend to pursue a career in engineering)

Yes(Top 2 Box)

96%(n=100)

No(Low 2 Box)

4%(n=4)

Q18. When you began your studies, did you plan to practice engineering when you completed your program? Base: Students who intend to pursue a career in engineering 2013 (n=104)

Similar to the overall level, nearly nine in ten students who intend to pursue a career in engineering say they were definitely or likely to do so when they began their studies.

intention to apply for licensure
Intention to Apply for Licensure

Do You Intend To Apply for Licensure?

Yes(Top 2 Box)

68%(n=72)

No(Low 2 Box)

25%(n=27)

Q21. Do you intend to apply for licensure as a Professional Engineer (P.Eng.)? Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

Four in ten students (40%) indicate that they definitely intend to apply for licensure, while nearly three in ten (28%) probably will. One quarter of students are unlikely to apply, of which 16% probably won’t and 9% definitely won’t apply, while 7% don’t know.

intention to apply for licensure pursuing engineering career
Intention to Apply for Licensure- Pursuing Engineering Career

Do You Intend To Apply for Licensure?

Yes(Top 2 Box)

69%(n=72)

No(Low 2 Box)

24%(n=25)

Q21. Do you intend to apply for licensure as a Professional Engineer (P.Eng.)? Base: Respondents who intend to pursue a career in the engineering field 2013 (n=104)

Among those students who intend to pursue a career in engineering, four in ten students (40%) indicate that they definitely intend to apply for licensure, while a further three in ten (29%) say they probably will. One quarter of students are unlikely to apply for licensure, of which 14% probably won’t and 10% definitely won’t apply.

foresee applying in future p eng
Foresee Applying in Future P.Eng.
  • Of those students who do not plan on –or- are not sure if they will apply for licensure, the vast majority (81%) indicate that they probably or definitely will apply for licensure sometime down the road, while one in ten (11%) do not foresee themselves applying in the future or don’t know (7%). Due to very small base sizes, results should be interpreted with caution.

Do You Ever Foresee Yourself Applying for Licensure?

Yes(Top 2 Box)

81%(n=22)

No(Low 2 Box)

11%(n=3)

Q22. Do you ever foresee yourself applying for licensure as a Professional Engineer (P.Eng.)? Base: Respondents who said ‘no’ in Q21 2013 (n=27)

interest once told p eng licence is required to practice
Interest Once Told P.Eng. Licence is Required to Practice
  • Once told that a licence is required to legally refer to yourself as an engineer and practice as an engineer, the vast majority of those who originally did not plan or were unsure of their intentions now indicate they are definitely or probably likely to apply for licensure. Due to very small base sizes, results should be interpreted with caution.

Given that a Licence is Required to Practice Engineering, Do You Intend to Apply?

Yes(Top 2 Box)

67%(n=8)

No(Low 2 Box)

25%(n=3)

Q24. Since a license is required to legally refer to yourself as an engineer, or to practice as an engineer, do you plan to apply for your P.Eng. licence? Base: Respondents who do not intend to apply for licensure or are not sure, 2013 (n=12)

application timeframe
Application Timeframe
  • Two-thirds of students who intend to apply for licensure plan to do so within one year (67%), of which exactly half think they will apply within six months of graduation (50%). Slightly more than one in ten intend to apply after a year (14%) , while two in ten remain undecided (20%).

When Do You Plan to Apply for Licensure?

Apply Within 1 Year(Top 2 Box)

67%(n=68)

Q27. Do you intend to apply for licensure...? Base: Respondents who plan to apply for licensure, 2013 (n=102)

reasons for waiting to apply
Reasons for Waiting to Apply
  • Among those students who plan to wait at least a year to apply for licensure or are unsure, the vast majority cite the desire for required work experience as the reason for the delay or uncertainty. Due to small base sizes, results should be interpreted with caution.

Why Do You Plan to Wait More Than a Year to Apply?

Q28. Why do you intend to wait more than a year to apply for the P.Eng.? Base: Respondents who said >1yr or don’t know/unsure in Q27, 2013 (n=34)

impact of waiving eit fees on likelihood to apply within six months
Impact of Waiving EIT Fees on Likelihood to Apply within Six Months
  • Upon learning that they could be eligible to have their first year EIT fees waived, six in ten (61%) students who intend to apply for licensure more than a year after graduation say that they are very likely to apply within six months. One-quarter (24%) are somewhat likely to apply within six months, while less than one in ten are unlikely to apply (8%) in that timeframe or don’t know (8%).

(n=81)

Would you Apply Within 6 Month if Eligible to Have 1st Year EIT Fees Waived?

Likely(Top 2 Box)

84%(n=43)

x

Unlikely(Low 2 Box)

8%(n=4)

x

Q29. If you knew that by applying for licensure within 6 months of graduation you could be eligible to have the application and first year EIT program fees waived, how likely would you be to apply for licensure within that time frame? Base: Respondents who do not know or intend to apply for licensure >6 months after graduation, 2013 (n=51)

intended country of application
Intended Country of Application
  • Nearly all final year engineering students (96%) who intend to apply for licensure plan to apply in Canada. Fewer than one in ten also plan to apply in the US (7%) or abroad (5%).

Where Do You Intend to Apply for Licensure?

5%(n=5)

Abroad

Mentions may add to more than 100% as respondents were able to select more than one response

Q25. Where do you intend to apply for licensure? Base: Respondents who ever plan to apply for licensure, 2013 (n=102)

province of intended licensure
Province of Intended Licensure
  • Half of students who plan to apply for licensure intend to apply in New Brunswick (50%), followed by Alberta (35%) and Newfoundland/ Labrador (23%). Nearly one in ten plan to apply in British Columbia (14%), Nova Scotia (11%), Ontario (10%) or PEI (8%).

Q26. Please select the provinces and/or territories in which you intend on applying for licensure. Base: Respondents who plan to apply for licensure in Canada, 2013 (n=98)

engineering regulated by legislation
Engineering Regulated by Legislation
  • At eight in ten (82%), the vast majority of students know that engineering is regulated by legislation, while one in ten believe it is not and 5% are unsure.

Is the Practice of Engineering Regulated by Legislation?

Q5. As far as you know, is the practice of professional engineering regulated by legislation? Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

licensing for roles within engineering
Licensing for Roles within Engineering

Is a Licence Required Before Being Able to Do the Following?

Q8. As far as you know, is a licence required before being able to do the following in ... Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

Nine in ten students know that a licence is required to perform engineering work independently (92%) while seven in ten know it is needed to use the title ‘Engineer’ (72%). Eight in ten meanwhile know that it is not required to practice engineering work under the supervision of a P.Eng (78%).

knowledge of licensing and roles
Knowledge of Licensing and Roles
  • Over nine in ten students have a moderate (43%) or high (51%) level of knowledge of when a licence is required to legally perform actions/ duties within the engineering profession. Comparatively, fewer than one in ten have either little (2%) or no knowledge (4%) on the subject.

Knowledge Levels DefinedHigh: All Correct (3) in Q8Moderate: 2 Correct in Q8Low: 1 Correct in Q8None: Zero (0) Correct in Q8

Knowledge Level of Engineering Practices Requiring a Licence

High/Moderate(Top 2 Box)

94%(n=100)

x

Little/None(Low 2 Box)

6% (n=6)

x

Q8. As far as you know, is a licence required before being able to do the following in .. Base: All respondents 2013 n=(106)

organizational responsibilities 2013

2013 - Which Organization is Responsible for Each of the Follow Activities?

(n=79)

Organizational Responsibilities - 2013

Q9. Please indicate the organization responsible for each of the activities/ procedures listed below. Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

The vast majority of students are able to correctly identify that their respective provincial engineering association is the organization responsible for licensing engineers (82%) and that it also regulates the practice of professional engineers (74%). Comparatively, nearly nine in ten students know that CEAB is the organization that accredits University engineering programs (86%). Students are split however on which organization licenses companies offering engineering services, six in ten believe it is CEAB (60%), while half feel it is their respective provincial engineering association (52%) and almost two in ten don’t know (16%).

knowledge of organizational responsibility
Knowledge of Organizational Responsibility
  • Nearly nine in ten students have either a high (36%) or moderate (52%) level of knowledge concerning organizational responsibilities of activities/ procedures relating to the engineering profession. Slightly more than one in ten have either a low level (8%) or no knowledge (4%) on the subject.

Knowledge Level of Organizational Responsibility within the Engineering Profession

Knowledge Levels Defined

High: All Correct in Q9 (4)Moderate: 2 or 3 Correct in Q9Low: 1 Correct in Q9None: All Incorrect (0) in Q9

High/ Moderate(Top 2 Box)

88%(n=93)

x

Little/ None(Low 2 Box)

12%(n=13)

x

Q9. Please indicate the organization responsible for each of the activities/ procedures listed below. Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

provincial engineering association

Provincial Engineering Association

Attendance at seminar(s) and awareness of SMP program

attendance of provincial engineering association seminar
Attendance of Provincial Engineering Association Seminar
  • Six in ten (58%) students report having ever attended a seminar or workshop given by a representative from their respective provincial engineering association.

Ever Attend a [PEGNL/Engineers PEI/Engineers NS/APEGNB]Seminar?

Q11. Have you ever attended a workshop/ seminar/ talk given by a [PEGNL/Engineers PEI/Engineers NS/APEGNB/] representative? Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

association with smp
Association with SMP
  • Slightly more than one-third of students (35%) are aware of a Student Membership Program (SMP) offered by their respective provincial engineering association. Of which, 3% are current members, one quarter have heard of it and are interested in becoming a member (26%) and 6% have heard of the program but are not interested in membership.

Aware(Top 3 Box)

35%(n=37)

Q32. Which of the following best describes your association with the [PEGNL/Engineers PEI/Engineers NS/APEGNB/]’s Student Membership Program (SMP)? Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

professional engineers act1
Professional Engineers Act
  • Over nine in ten students report being familiar with the Professional Engineers Act of their respective province. Four in ten report having a fair amount (43%) or just a little knowledge (45%) about the Professional Engineers Act, while 3% claim to know a lot about it. Only 2% say they have never heard of the Act.

How Much Do You Know About the Professional Engineers Act of

[Newfoundland and Labrador/PEI/Nova Scotia/New Brunswick]?

Familiar(Top 3 Box)

92%(n=97)

x

Q6. The practice of engineering is regulated by the Professional Engineers Act of [Newfoundland and Labrador/PEI/Nova Scotia/New Brunswick ]. Which of the following best describes how much you know about the Professional Engineers Act of [Newfoundland and Labrador/PEI/Nova Scotia/New Brunswick ]? Base: All respondents 2013 (n=106)

professional engineers act cont d

77%

(n=74)

Professional Engineers Act (cont’d)
  • Close to eight in ten students heard about the Act through a university law and ethics course (53%) or a university professor or administrator (24%).

Where Did You First Hear About the Professional Engineers Act of [Newfoundland and Labrador/PEI/Nova Scotia/New Brunswick ]?

University prof or course

Mentions <4% are not shown

Q7. Where did you first hear about the Professional Engineers Act of [Newfoundland and Labrador / PEI / Nova Scotia / New Brunswick]? Base: Respondents who know about the Act 2013 (n=97)

inspiration for pursuing engineering
Inspiration for Pursuing Engineering
  • Exactly four in ten students indicate that a particular individual inspired them to enter engineering specifically. Of those who were inspired, half cite a parent as the individual who motivated them while three in ten mention another family member and two in ten a friend/ acquaintance or a teacher.
  • The vast majority indicate that it was a male who inspired them.

(n=42)

(n=64)

Q33B. Thinking back to before you began your current undergraduate program, would you say there was a particular individual(s) or role model(s) who inspired you to study engineering specifically? Base: All respondents, 2013 n=106. Q33C. What was your relation to this person(s)? Base: Respondents who were inspired by someone to pursue engineering. 2013 n=42. Q33D. Please indicate the gender of each individual you selected. Base: Respondents who were inspired by someone to pursue engineering.

permanent residency
Permanent Residency
  • Nearly seven in ten final year engineering students are permanent residents of the province they are attending school in (68%). Of those who are attending school in one of the Atlantic provinces but are a permanent resident of another province, Alberta, PEI and Nova Scotia are the most common home provinces referenced by students.

Resident of Another Province/Territory:

Q34. For statistical purposes, we would like to know the location of your permanent residence. Please select the statement that most appropriately describes your current residency status: ? Base: All respondents, 2013 n=106; Q35. You indicated that you are attending university in [Newfoundland and Labrador/PEI/Nova Scotia/New Brunswick ] but are a permanent resident of another province/territory. Please select the province or territory in which you are a permanent resident. Base: Respondents who are not permanent residents of [Newfoundland and Labrador/PEI/Nova Scotia/New Brunswick ], 2013 n=26;

engineering disciplines
Engineering Disciplines
  • The most popular disciplines are civil engineering, followed by mechanical engineering and electrical engineering.

Mentions <3% (in 2013) are not shown

Q3/Q3B. Please indicate the engineering discipline in which you are currently studying by selecting one of the following options. Base: All respondents, 2013 n=106

workshop seminar attendance intention to pursue engineering career
Workshop/Seminar Attendance & Intention to Pursue Engineering Career

Intentions to Pursue Career within the Engineering Field

Intentions to pursue a career within the Engineering field are the same regardless if a student has attended a workshop/seminar.

workshop seminar attendance intention to apply for licensure
[Workshop/Seminar Attendance & Intention to Apply for Licensure

Intention to Apply for the Professional Engineers Licensure

  • Intentions to pursue their P.Eng. licence are the same regardless if a student has attended a workshop/seminar.
knowledge of professional engineers act intention to pursue engineering career
Knowledge of Professional Engineers Act & Intention to Pursue Engineering Career
  • Knowledge of the Professional Engineers Act has little influence over their intention to pursue a career in engineering.

Intentions to Pursue Career within the Engineering Field

**very small base size. Interpret with caution.

knowledge of professional engineers act intention to apply for licensure
Knowledge of Professional Engineers Act & Intention to Apply for Licensure

**very small base size. Interpret with caution.

Intention to Apply for the Professional Engineers Licensure

Knowledge of the Professional Engineers Act has little influence over whether students plan to pursue their P.Eng. Licence. The majority of students regardless of their level of knowledge intend to apply after graduation

knowledge of licensing and roles intention to pursue engineering career
Knowledge of Licensing and Roles & Intention to Pursue Engineering Career

**very small base size. Interpret with caution.

Intentions to Pursue Career within the Engineering Field

Knowledge in terms of roles and licensing requirements does not influence intent to pursue a career in the engineering field.

knowledge of licensing and roles intention to apply for licensure
Knowledge of Licensing and Roles & Intention to Apply for Licensure

**very small base size. Interpret with caution.

Intention to Apply for the Professional Engineers Licensure

Knowledge in terms of roles and licensing requirements does not influence intent to pursue a P.Eng. licence.

knowledge of organizational responsibility intention to pursue engineering career
Knowledge of Organizational Responsibility & Intention to Pursue Engineering Career

**very small base size. Interpret with caution.

Intentions to Pursue Career within the Engineering Field

Knowledge of organizational responsibility has no statistically significant impact on intention to pursue an engineering career.

knowledge of organizational responsibility intention to apply for licensure
Knowledge of Organizational Responsibility& Intention to Apply for Licensure

**very small base size. Interpret with caution.

Intention to Apply for the Professional Engineers Licensure

Knowledge of organizational responsibility has little influence on intention to apply for their engineering licensure.

slide54

Ipsos Reid Public Affairs

300 -160 Bloor Street East

Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4W 1B9

Sandra Guiry, Vice President

Phone: 416-324-2018

eMail: Sandra.Guiry@ipsos.com

Michael Howell, Senior Research Manager

Phone: 416-572-4407

eMail: Michael.Howell@ipsos.com

April 2013