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Water Hydraulic Conversion by Dan Pitstick Dan Sellers Nathan Schoonover

Water Hydraulic Conversion by Dan Pitstick Dan Sellers Nathan Schoonover

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Water Hydraulic Conversion by Dan Pitstick Dan Sellers Nathan Schoonover

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  1. Water Hydraulic Conversion by Dan Pitstick Dan Sellers Nathan Schoonover

  2. Introduction The purpose of this project is to convert an oil hydraulic turf mower into a water hydraulic turf mower. The key systems are drive train, steering, and mower drive.

  3. Hydrostat Design Calculations • Tractive Effort (TE) TE = (RR + GR + Fa + DP) * 1.1 RR = Rolling Resistance = Gross Vehicle Weight(GVW) * Rolling Radius GR= Grade Resistance = 0.01 * GVW * Grade % Fa = Acceleration Force = (Velocity * GVW) / (time * 32.16) DP = Drawbar Pull) = 0 since no drawbar pull TE = 390 lbs

  4. Hydrostat Design Calculations • Required Torque Treq = (TE * r) / (G*N) G = Gear Ratio = 4 N = Number of Motors = 2 Treq = 487 in-lbs • Maximum Required Motor Speed S = (168 * V * G)/ r = 500 rpm

  5. Motor Selection • Old Motor Parker TJ 0165 Low Speed High Torque Motor Displacement = 163 cc/rev • New Motor Nessie MVM 160 Water Hydraulic Motor Displacement = 160 cc/rev Max Torque = 100 N-m = 885 in-lbs

  6. Design Problems • Maximum Motor Speed • Max Speed of Nessie Motor is 200 rpm • Required Motor Speed of 511 rpm to reach 7.6 mph • Max ground speed using Nessie Motor 3 mph • Axial Loading • Motor cannot handle any axial loading • Fairfield planetary final drive solves this problem • S07A • Reduction Ratio of 4:1

  7. List of Fittings and Hoses

  8. Lift Hydraulics

  9. Hydraulic Lift • Hydraulic Cylinders • Volume Displaced • Rod End • V = A * L • A = Outside – Inside • L = Length of Rod • V = .994 * 5.870 = 5.835 in3 • Cylinder End • V = A * L • A = Cyl. Area • L = Length of Cyl • V = 2.76 * 5.87 = 16.2 in2

  10. Hydraulic Lift • Hydraulic Cylinders • Flow required • Q = V / s • V = Volume Displaced • S = time displaced • For Rod End • Q = 5.835 in3 / 2s = 2.92 in3/s • Q = .758 gpm = 2.87 L/min • For Cylinder End • Q = 16.2 in3 / 2s = 8.1 in3/s • Q = 2.1 gpm = 7.96 L/min • Total Flow • For Cylinders • 2 Cylinders * Max Flow = 2 * 2.1 gpm = 4.2 gpm

  11. Reel Hydraulics

  12. Reel Motors • Reel Description • 11 Blade Reels with Cutting Frequency of .047 in / mph • Maximum Mowing Speed of 3.7 mph • Reel Diameter = 5 inches • Reel Motor Speed Calculation • Reel Circumference = Pi * D = 3.14 * 5 = 1.309 ft = 2.44792 E-4 miles • 3.7 mph * (1rev / 2.44792 E-4 miles) = 250 rpm • Required Flow • Q = N * D = 250 rpm * 10cc/rev = 2.5 L/min • Total Flow = 3 * 2.5 = 7.5 L/min = 1.98 gpm

  13. Reel Mounting Problems • Oil Hydraulic Motor • Smaller Shaft • Splined Shaft • Water Hydraulic Motor • Larger Shaft • Smooth Shaft with Keyway • Solution • Design adapter incorporating Splined shaft with smooth shaft of water hydraulic motor

  14. Front Reel Hydraulics

  15. Rear Reel and Return Hydraulics

  16. Lift Hydraulics

  17. Goals of steering • To develop a steering valve design for water use • Be able to steer effectively with small user input. • Be able to produce the valve for use in Jacobsen turf mower.

  18. 4 design possibilities • Chrome plate existing design • Convert to electric steering • Design completely new valve • Use 3 position 4-way valve at cylinder with toggle switch to control.

  19. Chrome plating • Use of electroless nickel plating provided by Millcreek metal finishing of Erie, PA • May be free of charge depending on size of parts and other specifications. • Good resistance to corrosion. • May have tolerance problem.

  20. Electric steering • Use electric solenoid with screw type gear to produce force. • Not much information on parts and components. • No knowledge of how system works. • Costs?

  21. New design • Simple so shop can manufacture it. • Will be able to build prototype for sure. • Will not have functionality of original. (It will be a jerk steer design).

  22. Chrome plate existing design…maybe Find out more on electric steering. Make new design out of plastic. Maybe test if Dan Pitstick finishes Hydro-drive. If other possibilities fail implement new valve design. Final design: use two ideas so if one doesn’t work, have the other.

  23. Most critical equation: P=(T/R)/A • P=Pressure required to turn • T=experimental torque • R=radius of turn from cylinder to kingpin. • A= functional cross-sectional area of cylinder. • In this case: P=(612lb-in/3in)/1.63in2 • Pressure required =125 psi.

  24. Other important calculations • Swept volume (SV) = stroke*A • Valve disp. (HD) = SV/n. Note: n is number of turns. • Minimum pump flow (Q) = HD*SS*60/231. Q=1.9 approximately.

  25. Pump Flow • Hydrostatic Drive Max = 17 gpm • Steering Max = 2 gpm • Reel Drive Max = 2 gpm • Lift Cylinder Max = 5 gpm • Total Flow = 26 gpm

  26. Contacts • Motors, Valves, and Pump • Danfoss – Nessie • Fenner • Fittings • Parker • Swagelok • Faster • Hoses • Parker • Swagelok

  27. Time Line • March 9 • Have all Motors, Valves, and Cylinders ordered • Contact fitting suppliers to see what is available and place orders • Make list of hose length and size needed and contact suppliers • March 23 – April 6 • Upon arrival of parts, begin assembly • April 20 • Finalize poster • April 27 • Turn in project report