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Chapter 8 DRUGS
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  1. Chapter 8DRUGS

  2. Introduction • A drug can be defined as a natural or synthetic substance that is used to produce physiological or psychological effects in humans or other higher order animals. • Narcotic drugs are analgesics, meaning they relieve pain by a depressing action on the central nervous system. This effects functions such as blood pressure, pulse rate, and breathing rate. • The regular use of a narcotic drug will invariably lead to physical dependence. • The most common source for these narcotic drugs is opium, extracted from poppies. DRUGS

  3. Opiates • Morphine is readily extracted from opium and is used to synthesize heroin. • Addicts frequently dissolve heroin in water by heating it in a spoon, and then inject in the skin. • Heroin produces a “high” that is accompanied by drowsiness and a sense of well-being that generally last for three to four hours. • Codeine is also present in opium, but it is usually prepared synthetically from morphine. DRUGS

  4. Other Opiates • OxyContin, with the active ingredient oxycodone, is not derived from opium or morphine, but does have the same physiological effects on the body as do opium narcotics. • OxyContin is prescribed to a million patients for treatment of chronic pain. • Methadone is another well-known synthetic opiate. • Methadone which is pharmacologically related to heroin, appears to eliminate the addict’s desire for heroin while producing minimal side effects. DRUGS

  5. Hallucinogens • Another class of drugs is hallucinogens; marijuana is the most well-known member of this class. • Hallucinogens cause marked changes in normal thought processes, perceptions, and moods. • Marijuana is the most controversial drug in this class because its long-term effects on health are still largely unknown. DRUGS

  6. Marijuana • Marijuana refers to a preparation derived from the plant Cannabis. • The chemical substance largely responsible for the hallucinogenic properties of marijuana is known as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. • The THC content of Cannabis varies in different parts of the plant, generally decreasing in the following sequence: resin, flowers, leaves, with little THC in the stem, roots, or seeds. • The THC-rich resin is known ashashish. • Marijuana does not cause physical dependency, but the risk of harm is in heavy, long-term use. DRUGS

  7. Other Hallucinogens • Other hallucinogens include LSD, mescaline, PCP, psilocybin, and MDMA (Ecstasy). • LSD is synthesized from lysergic acid, and can cause hallucinations that can last for 12 hours. • Phencyclidine, or PCP, is often synthesized in clandestine laboratories and is often smoked, ingested, or sniffed. • Phencyclidine is often mixed with other drugs, such as LSD, or amphetamine, and is sold as a powder (“angle dust”), capsule, or tablet. • Oral intake of PCP first leads to feelings of strength and invulnerability, which may turn to depression, tendencies toward violence, and suicide. DRUGS

  8. Depressants • Depressants are another class of drugs. • Depressants are substances used to depress the functions of the central nervous system. • Depressants calm irritability and anxiety and may induce sleep. • These include alcohol (ethanol), barbiturates, tranquilizers, and various substances that can be sniffed, such as airplane glue, model cement, or aerosol gas propellants such as freon. DRUGS

  9. Depressants • Alcohol (ethyl alcohol) enters the body’s bloodstream and quickly travels to the brain, where it acts to suppress the brain’s control of thought processes and muscle coordination. • Barbiturates, or “downers,” are normally taken orally and create a feeling of well-being, relax the body, and produce sleep. • Tranquilizers, unlike barbiturates, produce a relaxing tranquility without impairment of high-thinking faculties or inducing sleep. • Sniffing has immediate effects such as exhilaration, but impairs judgment and may cause liver, heart, and brain damage or even death. DRUGS

  10. Stimulants • The drug classification of stimulants includes amphetamines, sometimes known as “uppers” or “speed,” and cocaine, which in its free-base form is known as crack. • Stimulants are substances taken to increase alertness or activity, followed by a decrease in fatigue and a loss of appetite. DRUGS

  11. Stimulants • Amphetamine and methamphetamine, often injected intravenously, cause an initial “rush,” followed by an intense feeling of pleasure. • This is followed by a period of exhaustion and a prolonged period of depression. • Cocaine, extracted from the leaves of Erythroxylin coca, causes increased alertness and vigor, accompanied by the suppression of hunger, fatigue, and boredom. • Crack is cocaine mixed with baking soda and water, then heated. • Crack is often smoked in glass pipes, and, like cocaine, stimulates the brain’s pleasure center. DRUGS

  12. Club Drugs • The term club drugs refers to synthetic drugs that are used at nightclubs, bars, and raves (all-night dance parties). • Substances that are often used as club drugs include, but are not limited to, MDMA (Ecstasy), GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate), Rohypnol (“Roofies”), ketamine, and methamphetamine. • GHB and Rohypnol are central nervous system depressants that are often connected with drug-facilitated sexual assault, rape, and robbery. DRUGS

  13. Club Drugs • Methylenedioxymethamphetamine, also known as MDMA or Ecstasy, is a synthetic mind-altering drug that exhibits many hallucinogenic and amphetamine-like effects. • Ecstasy enhances self-awareness and decreases inhibitions; however, seizures, muscle breakdown, stroke, kidney failure, and cardiovascular system failure often accompany chronic abuse. • Ketamine is primarily used as a veterinary animal anesthetic that in humans causes euphoria and hallucinations. • Ketamine can also cause impaired motor functions, high blood pressure, amnesia, and mild respiratory depression. DRUGS

  14. Anabolic Steroids • Yet another category of drugs is the anabolic steroids. • These are synthetic compounds that are chemically related to the male sex hormone testosterone. • Anabolic steroids are often abused by individuals who are interested in accelerating muscle growth. • Side effects include unpredictable effects on mood and personality, depression, diminished sex drive, halting bone growth, and liver cancer. DRUGS

  15. Drug-Control Laws • The U.S. federal law known as the Controlled Substances Act will serve to illustrate a legal drug-classification system created to prevent and control drug abuse. • This federal law establishes five schedules of classification for controlled dangerous substances on the basis of a drug’s: • potential for abuse • potential for physical and psychological dependence • medical value DRUGS

  16. Schedules of Classification • Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse and have no currently accepted medical use such as heroin, marijuana, methaqualone and LSD. • Schedule II drugs have a high potential for abuse and have medical use with severe restrictions such as cocaine, PCP, and most amphetamine and barbiturate prescriptions. • Schedule III drugs have less potential for abuse and a currently accepted medical use such as all barbiturate prescriptions not covered under Schedule II, codeine, and anabolic steroids. DRUGS

  17. Schedules of Classification • Schedule IV drugs have a low potential for abuse and have a current medical use such as darvon, phenobarbital, and some tranquilizers such as diazepam (valium) and chlordiazepoxide (librium). • Schedule V drugs must show low abuse potential and have medical use such as opiate drug mixtures that contain nonnarcotic medicinal ingredients. DRUGS

  18. Drug Identification • The challenge or difficulty of forensic drug identification comes in selecting analytical procedures that will ensure a specific identification of a drug. • This plan, or scheme of analysis, is divided into two phases. • Screening test that is nonspecific and preliminary in nature to reduce the possibilities to a manageable number. • Confirmation test that is a single test that specifically identifies a substance. DRUGS

  19. Preliminary Analysis • Faced with the prospect that the unknown substance may be any one of a thousand or more commonly encountered drugs, the analyst must employ screening tests to reduce these possibilities to a small and manageable number. • This objective is often accomplished by subjecting the material to a series of color tests that will produce characteristic colors for the more commonly encountered illicit drugs. • Microcrystalline tests can also be used to identify specific drug substances by studying the size and shape of crystals formed when the drug is mixed with specific reagents. DRUGS

  20. Confirmational Determination • Once this preliminary analysis is completed, a confirmational determination is pursued. • Forensic chemists will employ a specific test to identify a drug substance to the exclusion of all other known chemical substances. • Typically infrared spectrophotometry or mass spectrometry is used to specifically identify a drug substance. DRUGS

  21. Collection and Preservation • The field investigator has the responsibility of ensuring that the evidence is properly packaged and labeled for the laboratory. • Generally common sense is the best guide, keeping in mind that the package must prevent the loss of the contents and/or cross-contamination. • Often the original container in which the drug was seized will suffice. • All packages must be marked with information that is sufficient to ensure identification by the officer in the future and establish the chain of custody. DRUGS

  22. Key Points • A drug is a natural or synthetic substance that is used to produce physiological or psychological effects in humans or other higher-order animals. • •Narcotic drugs are analgesics, meaning they relieve pain by a depressing action on the central nervous system.• • The most common source for narcotic drugs is opium. Morphine is extracted from opium and used to synthesize heroin. • Opiates are not derived from opium or morphine, but they have the same physiological effects on the body. Examples of opiates include methadone and OxyContin (oxycodone).

  23. Key Points (Cont.) • Hallucinogens cause marked changes in normal thought processes, perceptions, and moods. Marijuana is the most well-known drug in this class. Other hallucinogens include LSD, mescaline, PCP, psilocybin, and MDMA (Ecstasy) • Depressants decrease the activity of the central nervous system, calm irritability and excitability, and may cause sleep. Depressants include alcohol (ethanol), barbiturates, tranquilizers, and various substances that can be sniffed, such as airplane glue or model cement.• • Stimulants increase the activity of the central nervous system and are taken to increase alertness and activity. Stimulants include amphetamines, sometimes known as ““uppers”” or ““speed,”” and cocaine, which in its freebase form is known as crack.

  24. Key Points (Cont.) Club drugs are synthetic drugs that are used at nightclubs, bars, and raves (all-night dance parties). Some club drugs act as stimulants; others have depressant effects. Substances that are often used as club drugs include, but are not limited to, MDMA (Ecstasy), GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate), Rohypnol (““roofies””), ketamine, and methamphetamine. Anabolic steroids are synthetic compounds that are chemically related to the male sex hormone testosterone. Anabolic steroids are often abused by individuals who are interested in accelerating muscle growth.• Federal law establishes five schedules of classification for controlled dangerous substances on the basis of a drug’s potential for abuse, potential for physical and psychological dependence, and medical value.

  25. Key Points (Cont.) • Analysts employ screening tests to determine the identity of drugs present in a sample. These tests reduce the number of possible drugs to a small and manageable number • A series of color tests produce characteristic colors for the more commonly encountered illicit drugs.• • After preliminary testing, forensic chemists employ more specific tests to identify a drug substance to the exclusion of all other known chemical substances. Infrared spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry typically are used to specifically identify a drug substance.

  26. Review Questions • Name two physiological factors and two non-drug factors that influence drug dependence. • Under what class of drugs is cocaine listed according to U.S. federal drug laws? Explain why this classification is pharmacologically incorrect. • What is the source of most narcotic drugs? From what plant is this substance derived? • What opium derivative is most widely used by addicts? How is it typically administered? Give two reasons why this route of administration is popular. • What is the most widely used illicit drug in the United States? Under what class of drugs is it listed and what are its short-term physical and psychological effects at low to moderate doses? • What is the most widely abused drug in the United States? Under what class of drugs is it listed and what are its short-term physical and psychological effects at low to moderate doses? • How can excessive use of depressants cause death? • Name the two most commonly abused illegal stimulants and the smokable forms of each. Why does smoking provide a more intense drug experience than inhaling, or ““snorting,”” stimulants? • Name two club drugs that are associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, rape, and robbery. Why are these drugs relatively easy to administer to an unsuspecting victim? • What is the most popular club drug? Name three negative health effects associated with chronic use of the drug.

  27. Review Questions (Cont.) • On what three criteria does the Controlled Substances Act classify dangerous substance? • According to the Controlled Substances Act, what is the legal difference between a schedule I drug and a schedule II drug? • What is a controlled substance analog? Why are such substances considered schedule I drugs • What is a precursor? How is possession of a precursor treated under the Controlled Substances Ac? • List and describe the two phases in a criminalist’’s scheme of action for identifying a drug • What two goals must laboratory testing accomplish to positively identify a drug • How does a color test work? What is the main limitation of a color test for identifying drugs? • Describe how a microcrystalline test works. Name two advantages of microcrystalline tests? • How are ultraviolet spectrophotometry and infrared spectrophotometry used in drug analysis? • Name two botanical features used to identify marijuana under a microscope. What method of examination is often used when a microscopic examination cannot be obtained?