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ACE Initiative

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  1. ACE Initiative • Accelerating Campus Entrepreneurship (ACE) Initiative isa joint collaboration between; • Dundalk Institute of Technology • Cork Institute of Technology • Institute of Technology Blanchardstown, • Institute of Technology Sligo • National University of Ireland Galway  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  2. Accelerating Campus EntrepreneurshipKey Themes • Organisational and Culture Change. • Embedding Technology Entrepreneurship into Non Business. • Multi-disciplinary Approach to Entrepreneurship Education. • Pedagogies, Teaching and Curriculum Development.  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  3. ACE - Research Methodology • Identify Best Practice Models • Comprehensive survey of 22 Higher Education Institutions (HEI) • Undergrad Survey to 1st Year Non-Business (296) • Post Grad Survey (44) • Industry Survey (33)  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  4. Research Findings Overview of Best Practice Models  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  5. European and US Best Practice Models include: • NCGE / NICENT - e-learning • Finnish Polytechnic Network (FINPIN) • Scottish Institute of Enterprise (SIE) • MIT • Berkley • Babson… University of Texas… Stanford • The Cambridge E Phenomenon  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  6. Ireland – NICENT • Strategic support and bottom-up activities • Multidisciplinary integrated approach – available to all • rewards academic involvement • ongoing evaluation • Third level Activities – experiential learning, blended teaching, e-learning, academic champions in technical schools, & extracurricular activities: • competitions, internships, student clubs, bootcamp  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  7. The M.I.T. Student can.. Do any module from any school and have credit transfer Apply for the ‘Entrepreneurship and Innovation Track’ Participate in ‘Independent Activity Period’ for credits (4 weeks in January) E-Lab and G-Lab: entrepreneurship and global entrepreneurship networks Become involved in entrepreneurial clubs  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  8. Challenges for the Magnet Model at MIT • Raising Awareness • spread the word that entrepreneurship programmes are accessible, appropriate for non business students. • Achieving a Critical Mass of Faculty Interest • can lead to enhanced credibility. • Creating Courses for Non Business Student  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  9. Technology Entrepreneurship Theory to Practice for Trainers • Lester Centre for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, University of California in Berkeley. • Programme outlines the best of US entrepreneurship curriculum and shows how they built a complete curriculum to teach everything from the theory to the practice of entrepreneurship.  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  10. Harvard BS (European Entrepreneurship Colloquium for Participant Centred Learning • Teach the teachers Programme • Focus on European Professors of entrepreneurship • Mix of process • Network building  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  11. Additional Resources for trainers • International Entrepreneurship Educators programme (IEEP) • Supported by Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation (US) and the Higher Education Academy (UK) and run jointly by the NCGE and Enterprise Educators UK. • Babson • Arthur M. Blank Center for Entrepreneurship: First entrepreneurship centre established at an academic institution  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  12. Research Findings • Surveys • HEIs • Undergraduate • Postgraduate • Industry  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  13. Higher Education Institutions (HEIs)Survey Findings • Response Rate: • 62.5% of third levels participated in survey • Focus of Survey: Strategy, Culture, Infrastructure, Multi-disciplinary Approach, Resources, Challenges and Development  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  14. 1. Organisational and Culture Change • Absence of articulated strategic policy • Diffused responsibility at management level • Lack of enterprise culture across campus • Absence of formally nominated entrepreneurial champions at organisational level • Conflict: patent versus papers • Limited evaluation mechanisms  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  15. 2. Embedding Entrepreneurship into Non Business Fragmented national approach 83.3% of HEIs do not have Technology Entrepreneurship programme Accreditation of existing commercialisation pathways not addressed Pedagogies still based on class-room approach Limited engagement and training of entrepreneurs as teachers No formal supports available for undergraduates Limited formal links between academics and TTO / ILO / Incubators  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  16. 3. Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Entrepreneurship Education • Almost 46% reported having a formalised collaborative approach for developing entrepreneurship education • Approx. two thirds provide platform for cross disciplinary discussion between students (how comprehensive??) • Many have champions outside business school • Only NICENT model details an established integrated approach  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  17. Perceived Benefits to Implementing across Disciplines • More ‘rounded’ graduates • More focused projects • Realises potential of multi-disciplinary teams • Gives students knowledge/skills necessary to exploit business opportunities in their business sectors • Increases awareness of opportunities for self-employment • Increases employment opportunities for students  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  18. 4. Pedagogies, Teaching and Curriculum Development Curriculum Development driven by individuals rather than strategically integrated Limited formal exchange and access to best practice teaching material Limited professional reward for academics No requirement for educators to have real life entrepreneurship experience Entrepreneurship development is linked to key individuals with limited access to resources  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  19. Undergraduate Survey Findings (1st Year Non-Business) • 296 Responses • Majority (78%) interested in starting a business • 48% are influenced by family-owned businesses • Main motivation – to be own boss, to obtain wealth and success • 57% - continuously come up with new ideas  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  20. Undergraduate Survey Findings ctd. • Self confidence, being determined and hard working, considered most important characteristics • 72% agreed that entrepreneurship education is an important course element • 64.1% felt that their respective college currently does not do enough to create awareness of entrepreneurship as a potential career option • 81% feel entrepreneurship is important for economic growth of Ireland  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  21. Post-Graduate Survey Findings • 44 responses • Majority of students had no knowledge of:- -IP Policy, Enterprise Supports, Funding Mechanisms • Strong interest in application of research. • Strong interest to setting up own business later in career. • 90% believe there is little or no academic credibility in pursuing commercialisation. • System prevents students from engaging directly in enterprise development or technology commercialisation.  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  22. Industry Survey Findings • Responses 33 • Key entrepreneurial skills • Communication skill • Innovative and creative thinking • Problem solving skills • How to pitch the business • Project management  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  23. Industry Survey Findings ctd. • Recognition of Entrepreneurial Behaviour in the workplace is channelled through: • Inventor competitions • Promotion • Allowing staff freedom to develop new products • Stock options • Bonuses  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  24. Industry Survey ctd. • Third level colleges could engage with Industry to promote entrepreneurship through Real life projects, Student placement, Venture simulations • Expectations of organisations from work placement: Students should have; • Desire to learn • Understanding of opportunity • Technological skills • Understanding of business  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  25. Key Challenges • Strategy and implementation • Cross faculty cooperation and champions • Academic credibility • Embedding technology entrepreneurship • Accreditation systems • New pedagogy and curricula • Networks and alliances • Train the trainers • Resources  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09

  26. Accelerating Campus Entrepreneurship (ACE) Initiative • Research • Development • Implementation • Evaluation  Caroline O’Reilly Feb. ‘09